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Measuring board feet of lumber

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Forum topic by bamajoey posted 08-07-2018 11:57 PM 1086 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bamajoey

15 posts in 2463 days


08-07-2018 11:57 PM

Twenty plus years ago I had a friend of mine that owned a cabinet shop, order 1000 board feet of mahogany. I have some of it left that I want to sell but I’m not sure how to measure it for resale. When I bought it, it came planed and sanded 3 sides. It was 3/4 thick when I received it. To resell it should I figure the board feet as 4/4 or 3/4?

-- Joey


36 replies so far

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johnstoneb

3011 posts in 2316 days


#1 posted 08-08-2018 12:02 AM

You paid for 4/4. You’re choice.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Rich

3649 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 08-08-2018 12:32 AM


You paid for 4/4. You re choice.

- johnstoneb

Yep, 4/4.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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TravisH

613 posts in 2078 days


#3 posted 08-09-2018 10:00 PM

Get as much out of it as you can. Nothing wrong with that.

Where I would have issue is if you started quoting price based off board ft and used 4/4 in your calculation.

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SkanWoods

17 posts in 70 days


#4 posted 08-09-2018 10:31 PM

When I measure large quantities of wood, I stack all boards of equal width and length then measure the stack to get a calculation. Can also be used for individual boards. Use the formula: length (inches) x width (inches) x thickness (inches) / 144= board feet

Typically I will see 7/8” thick planed as a minimum for 4/4, I would just measure them and stick to using .75 as a thickness into that equation. Hope this helps!

-- Ryan

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Steve Peterson

391 posts in 3225 days


#5 posted 08-09-2018 11:20 PM

When I go to Home Depot and buy a 1×12, it is only 3/4” thick. It seems reasonable to sell a 12”x12”x3/4” piece as a board foot as long as the buyer knows that is how you are measuring it.

-- Steve

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rustfever

759 posts in 3453 days


#6 posted 08-09-2018 11:38 PM

Wood is measured by the mill when it is in the “rough”. So a rough board that is 1” x 12” x 4’-0” is ‘four board foot’.
[1’ x 12” x 4/4]

When the mill planes or smooth the board, they DO NOT CHANGE the measurement. So a board that is ‘finished’ milled as 3/4” x 11-1/2 ” x 4’-0” is still sold as ‘4 board foot’.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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splintergroup

2304 posts in 1365 days


#7 posted 08-10-2018 04:42 PM

Round up to 4/4 for the thickness and up to the nearest inch for the width.

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EarlS

1615 posts in 2491 days


#8 posted 08-10-2018 05:05 PM

from my experience, 4/4 describes wood between 1-1/8” for un-planed wood, to 7/8” for planed wood, and 13/16” for planed and sanded wood. You could describe it as 3/4” actual thickness, planed and sanded, 3 sides. The planning and sanding are always adders when buying lumber at the sawmill. That avoids any confusion.

You might also want to include comments on the condition of the wood, splits, checking, knot holes, that kind of thing. There is a scale used by the lumber industry to classify wood on its quality, as well.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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rwe2156

3090 posts in 1624 days


#9 posted 08-11-2018 01:27 PM

Yes, you’re buying surfaced lumber “as was” not “as is”.

Also, round up the widths the next even number.

Here’s a story: I went to a local supplier to buy some rough cherry. When the guy in the warehouse went to calculate the BF, he laid several boards across the forklift and measured the total width (as opposed to calculating each board, rounding up the width).

I asked him if that was the way the did all their lumber? Yup.

Needless to say, I had no problem with that!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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splintergroup

2304 posts in 1365 days


#10 posted 08-11-2018 02:01 PM


Here s a story: I went to a local supplier to buy some rough cherry. When the guy in the warehouse went to calculate the BF, he laid several boards across the forklift and measured the total width (as opposed to calculating each board, rounding up the width).

I asked him if that was the way the did all their lumber? Yup.

Needless to say, I had no problem with that!!

- rwe2156

I had the same experience, loved it!

Where I buy wood, one fellow will measure each board while the other fellow will measure in batch. The batch method is both faster and better for me since I got an additional 10 bf with this method.

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Rich

3649 posts in 732 days


#11 posted 08-11-2018 02:07 PM

My lumber dealer, Woodworker’s Source, does not round up the width to the next inch — they work in 1/4” increments. Anyone who let’s a dealer round up like that is getting ripped off. Think about it, say you have a 10 foot board that’s 6-1/4” wide, and they round it to 7”. That’s 5/8 of a board foot you’d be paying for that you didn’t get. If the wood is $10/bdft, you’d be getting screwed for $6.25 per board.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rick S.

10536 posts in 3176 days


#12 posted 08-11-2018 03:15 PM



My lumber dealer, Woodworker s Source, does not round up the width to the next inch — they work in 1/4” increments. Anyone who let s a dealer round up like that is getting ripped off. Think about it, say you have a 10 foot board that s 6-1/4” wide, and they round it to 7”. That s 5/8 of a board foot you d be paying for that you didn t get. If the wood is $10/bdft, you d be getting screwed for $6.25 per board.

- Rich

YEP! ^^^^

-- Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!

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Rich

3649 posts in 732 days


#13 posted 08-11-2018 03:42 PM


Where I buy wood, one fellow will measure each board while the other fellow will measure in batch. The batch method is both faster and better for me since I got an additional 10 bf with this method.

- splintergroup

To be fair, you didn’t get an additional 10 bdft of lumber, you simply didn’t pay for wood you weren’t receiving. The round-up-to-the-inch thing is ridiculous.

Without a doubt, the batch it up and measure is the fairest method of all. I assume it only works when the boards are all the same length.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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bamajoey

15 posts in 2463 days


#14 posted 08-11-2018 08:33 PM

I appreciate all the info. When I measured this lumber I rounded down. Some of it is wider on one end than it is on the other, for example 14 3/4 on one end and 15 1/4 on the other, so I figure it at 14 1/2. This way I can make sure whoever buys it will get all they pay for. I was thinking it should be measured at 4/4, so that is how I will sell it. Thanks again.

-- Joey

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Rayne

1057 posts in 1682 days


#15 posted 08-11-2018 08:56 PM

Once you figure out how much you’re going to sell yours, where are you planning to resell it? I might be interested in some.

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