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What I am Doing Wrong on My Joiner?

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Forum topic by simzee posted 07-18-2011 01:14 AM 1889 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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simzee

1 post in 2151 days


07-18-2011 01:14 AM

I am trying to joint 4 X 6 maple boards for a bench but I seem to be putting a taper on to the board instead of getting it flat. I have a Delta DJ20 8 inch jointer. What Am I doing Wrong?


19 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#1 posted 07-18-2011 01:23 AM

Your tables aren’t parallel. You’ll need a good straightedge to determine how much needs to be moved. DJ20 is pretty common; let’s get an owner in here to walk you through the fix!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3563 days


#2 posted 07-18-2011 01:24 AM

Silly question, are you using the jointer on both sides of the board?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3231 days


#3 posted 07-18-2011 01:30 AM

What Lee said….. at least, that’s the first thing I’d check. If the tables are out, that’s all you will do…... make wedges.
- JJ

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

526 posts in 2652 days


#4 posted 07-18-2011 04:02 AM

Check to see if your fence is square to the table as well.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3114 days


#5 posted 07-18-2011 04:06 AM

if you are using a jointer- and getting a taper = most likely your jointer is working just fine.

a jointer creates 1 flat surface – but does not create a parallel surface, you’d use a thickness planer for that.

Now. if you are getting a bowed or cupped surface on your jointer, then that would be a different story.

ask yourself this – is the surface the jointer is producing flat and straight (to itself – not in relation to the opposing surface)? if so – your jointer and your technique is spot on. now use a thicknesser to make it parallel on both sides.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

416 posts in 2303 days


#6 posted 07-18-2011 05:45 AM

Silly question on my part… are you working the convex or concave edge of the board?

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2583 posts in 2557 days


#7 posted 07-18-2011 06:19 AM

PurpLev…..

What does it mean if you ARE getting a bowed or cupped surface after running it through the jointer??.....because that is what I get most of the time!!! Its really frustrating, and I can’t seem to fix it

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2864 days


#8 posted 07-18-2011 09:40 AM

I have gotten this same question so often that I did a dedicated story on it at the link below.
The gist of it is that a jointer has no way to cut opposing sides parallel because it cannot “read” the opposing side as a planer does. It will make one side nice and flat so you can take that to the planer, put the jointed side down on the planer table and then cut the opposing side parallel (no taper) with the side you jointed.

My Jointer Cuts Tapers!

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#9 posted 07-18-2011 06:25 PM

I feel like I’m learning here, so I’ll ask some more questions and maybe learn some more.

I understand that the jointer cannot reference the opposing side. Let us assume that Simzee’s boards came off the table saw and are foursquare.

If, after several passes on one side, the lead edge is closer to the top edge than the trailing edge is to the top edge, wouldn’t it be true that the jointer is cutting the taper?

And would it be true that a jointer, in theory, would be removing the same amount along the entire edge being cut (exclusive of snipe)?

And if that’s the theory, can a jointer in real life accomplish that?

If the last two questions are answered in the affirmative, would it then follow that Simzee’s jointer is out of adjustment?

Thanks for the inputs!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3114 days


#10 posted 07-18-2011 06:28 PM

darkremer – checkout TomHintz link above – it’s a very good writeout.

bottom line – if you are getting tapers – the jointer is just fine. if you are getting cupped/bowed boards – then your cutterhead is not aligned with your outfeed table, or one of the blades is higher then the rest. like I said – for a better understanding check out Tom’s Links:
http://www.newwoodworker.com/jntrtaprs.html

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#11 posted 07-18-2011 07:13 PM

Sometimes flattening boards on the jointer can be frustrating. If
there’s a way to use the tool perfectly every time I haven’t discovered
it yet.

The trick, in my experience, is to recognize the taper early and not
make any more cuts it the same manner trying to correct it. Your
technique if probably causing the taper.

If I get frustrated on the jointer (it does happen) I put the board aside
to deal with later or I take it to the bench and with my long level
and my eyes, I assess the problem in the board and usually just fix it with
hand planes.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3129 days


#12 posted 07-18-2011 08:07 PM

I ruined a lot of good wood on the jointer until a friend of mine pointed out the errors or my ways. I was trying to get too close to a finish-ready surface (after all, some people refer to jointers as planers), and wasted too much time and lumber trying to flatten a cupped board.

I take super-light cuts and only go deep enough to make sure the board is ‘faced’. If I have a cupped board, I rip it at the apex, joint the face and the edges I ripped, and glue them back together.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3051 days


#13 posted 07-18-2011 08:08 PM

Set the tables properly this is very important to get straight/square stock out of it. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2864 days


#14 posted 07-18-2011 08:33 PM

The jointer looks so simple and in terms of machinery overall, it really is simple. However, the jointer may be the most technique-dependent machine woodworkers use. It really does take some time to learn how to use one right. I had the benefit of a master cabinetmaker showing me this stuff early on but it still took a good amount of time before I got the “feel” for moving wood across a jointer right to get the best cut.
I like the advice of when getting frustrated, step back for a while or overnight or something. That little break really can make a difference!

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

View Blakep's profile

Blakep

232 posts in 2268 days


#15 posted 07-18-2011 08:51 PM

This is why I love Lumberjocks. Up until now I never really thought I needed a jointer because I didn’t really understand them or know what all they could do. After reading Toms article I think a jointer just got added to my list of wanted tools.

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