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Forum topic by SleepingFox posted 08-05-2018 12:48 AM 511 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SleepingFox

8 posts in 100 days


08-05-2018 12:48 AM

Hello,

I’ve recently started a little wood shop and have taken on my first project but feel a little over my head. I’m building some storm window sashes and have bought some Douglas Fir from a local lumber yard. I bought 2×12 boards and they seem like the moisture content might be quite high. In fact when I began planning them parts of the wood were actually wet. After leaving one on my garage floor overnight there was a large amount of moisture on the floor.

I’m worried that using this wood will result in the windows warping after they are assembled and no longer fit or break the glass.

What steps should I take to ensure this doesn’t happen? How do I know if the lumber is suitable? Do I need to get a different batch of lumber? If so what am I looking for so as to avoid this happening again.

Thanks for any help and advice :)


9 replies so far

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CaptainKlutz

516 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 08-05-2018 01:45 AM


How do I know if the lumber is suitable? Do I need to get a different batch of lumber? If so what am I looking for so as to avoid this happening again.

- SleepingFox

What is acceptable moisture level in wood?

Suggest you learn about moisture meters and buy one to take along for next wood shopping trip.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Firewood

483 posts in 1803 days


#2 posted 08-05-2018 03:25 AM

As mentioned in the article linked by CPT Klutz, the 2×12’s you purchased are construction lumber and are typically not dried below ~14% MC. It can be used for your shutters, but it needs to be stickered and dried closer to the 8% level first. Otherwise, once you start milling it, you will see significant twisting and bowing. Also, don’t leave it on the concrete floor too long. You already noticed the wet spot under the board as moisture was moving toward the colder surface of the concrete. Stickering will allow air to move all around the boards so they dry more evenly. Hope this helps.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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jbay

2732 posts in 1068 days


#3 posted 08-05-2018 03:48 AM

I wouldn’t use the material.

I would get some kiln dried poplar from a lumber company

-- “Hanging onto resentment, is letting someone you despise live rent-free in your head.” (Ann Landers)......

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Rich

3747 posts in 759 days


#4 posted 08-05-2018 03:52 AM


I wouldn t use the material.

I would get some kiln dried poplar from a lumber company

- jbay

Big +1.

This one almost seems like a setup. Douglas fir, 2X, left it flat on the garage floor…

But, if the OP is real, he should listen to jbay.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5588 posts in 2578 days


#5 posted 08-05-2018 04:09 AM



I wouldn t use the material.

I would get some kiln dried poplar from a lumber company

- jbay

+1

WARP city if you ignore this advice. Ask guys that have installed PT lumber what happens when the lumber is too wet.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Ralph's profile

Ralph

167 posts in 2302 days


#6 posted 08-05-2018 04:51 PM

For what it’s worth, just this past summer I made three storm windows out of 2×4s from the HD.
But not the common 2×4, these were Luan Mahogany, about $15 for an eight foot length (they have longer lengths as well). Used three per window. I don’t have the exact window measurement, but they are about three foot wide by about five foot high. The 2×4s measures about 1-1/16 by 3-1/2.
After one year of exposure to the elements, the storm windows seem to be OK, ie, no warping/shifting/movement whatsoever in any.
By luck I found the material because out of four local HDs, only one carried it.
The material I purchased was straight, not a single knot in any, the grain was perfectly straight, not your common 2×4s. Almost all the material on the rack was the same way, all very clean.
Hope it helps and good luck!

-- The greatest risk is not taking one...

View SleepingFox's profile

SleepingFox

8 posts in 100 days


#7 posted 08-05-2018 05:03 PM

Thanks for the advice everyone! I will certainly look for a new batch of dryer wood and use a moisture meter this time.


I wouldn t use the material.

I would get some kiln dried poplar from a lumber company

- jbay

Just curious why you recommend poplar over fir?

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2447 posts in 2304 days


#8 posted 08-05-2018 08:38 PM

If go to page 5 and look at both figure 13-1, and table 13-2 think will make a lot sense to. Don’t know where you live but where live cane makes a difference.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr190/chapter_13.pdf

-- Bill

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2732 posts in 1068 days


#9 posted 08-06-2018 02:17 AM


Thanks for the advice everyone! I will certainly look for a new batch of dryer wood and use a moisture meter this time.

I wouldn t use the material.

I would get some kiln dried poplar from a lumber company

- jbay

Just curious why you recommend poplar over fir?

- SleepingFox


My recommendation isn’t really against fir, it’s more against the construction grade quality of the material you would probably be getting if you were buying 2×12’s.
Fir would be fine if you could find some clear straight grain material within the proper moisture range.

I recommend the Poplar because it would be easier for me to find kiln dried, and it would be more stable than construction grade boards that have a higher moisture content.

PS I’m no wood expert, it’s just what I would do that I know would work for me in the climate I live.

-- “Hanging onto resentment, is letting someone you despise live rent-free in your head.” (Ann Landers)......

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