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Stanley S.W. Socket Chisel

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Forum topic by Stevej72 posted 07-13-2011 11:46 PM 1484 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stevej72

2 posts in 1160 days


07-13-2011 11:46 PM

I have some vintage Stanley chisels that I would like to put new handles on. It has a metal striking cap and leather washer as part of the handle. A metal shaft goes down the center and into the socket. We’ve removed the wood and still can’t get the metal shaft and striking cap out. It almost looks like an epoxy or adhesive of some kind inside the socket holding the shaft in. Any ideas on how to disassemble a chisel like this?


6 replies so far

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crank49

3421 posts in 1622 days


#1 posted 07-14-2011 12:01 AM

Just my two cents, but if they are old vintage Stanleys I wouldn’t think it could be epoxy. Maybe a little heat would melt the glue. Less than 200 degrees wouldn’t hurt the hardness or temper.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#2 posted 07-14-2011 01:36 PM

Sounds like an Everlast. They are not separate pieces. If I remember correctly, the end cap is peend onto the shaft.

Here is a pic of one cut open. Open the image in a new window, it doesn’t fit here.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#3 posted 07-14-2011 01:56 PM

I’ve run into one of these suckers before. I drilled the socket until I saw metal, then I drilled circumferentially around it, then used a small knife to evacuate it. I tried a couple of times to turn a handle for it until I gave up. I hope you have more luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Stevej72

2 posts in 1160 days


#4 posted 07-15-2011 04:05 PM

Thank you for the information, that is exactly what I needed.

View Les Casteel's profile

Les Casteel

155 posts in 1710 days


#5 posted 07-17-2011 11:07 PM

As the man said, you have a Stanley everlast. It’s name says it all. Its almost impossible to take them apart….and why should you? The only way I know to turn a new handle is to take two pieces of oak (or wood of choice), clamp them together and drill a hole down the length. Then glue them together with a single piece of newspaper between them. Turn them to fit, split the pieces apart, clean them up, re-glue them back onto the chisel handle. Its exactly the way you replace a handle on an old brace & bit. I’ve don this many times with mine and they should last a long time. Good luck!

-- Les, Arkansas, www.woodthatrocks.com

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1173 days


#6 posted 07-18-2011 01:19 AM

As the man said, you have a Stanley everlast. It’s name says it all. Its almost impossible to take them apart….and why should you? The only way I know to turn a new handle is to take two pieces of oak (or wood of choice), clamp them together and drill a hole down the length. Then glue them together with a single piece of newspaper between them. Turn them to fit, split the pieces apart, clean them up, re-glue them back onto the chisel handle. Its exactly the way you replace a handle on an old brace & bit. I’ve don this many times with mine and they should last a long time. Good luck!

Thank you for sharing this wisdom! I needed it!!!!

Archie

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