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Turning Chisel Recommendations

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Forum topic by ChefHDAN posted 07-12-2011 08:43 PM 1845 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChefHDAN

381 posts in 1545 days


07-12-2011 08:43 PM

I recently picked up a Lathe from a fellow LJ and am now looking to get some chisels to play with the new tool in the shop. I’ve never turned and have located two sets that appear to fit the budget, a 1/2” set and a 1” set.
http://pro.woodworker.com/5-pc-1-carbon-turning-set-mssu-873-826.asp?search=&searchmode=2 I would appreciate feedback from those who have the experience to comment and offer suggestions of the best path to take for a new turner since I don’t know which set would be the most useful.

Thanks Ya’ll

-- Sssshhhh, I'm pretending to be working


21 replies so far

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richgreer

4524 posts in 1770 days


#1 posted 07-12-2011 09:03 PM

The website you cited requires me to login, which I am not willing to do.

Let me provide this advice.

(1) The best cutting tools in the world will not work well if you cannot sharpen them properly. You really need a good sharpening system if you are going to turn.

(2) My second point is almost a contradiction with the first. There are some tools that do not require sharpening. They use carbide cutting tips. When the tips go dull you rotate them or replace them. I’m a fan and I use a combination of these tools and more conventional tools. Here is what I am talking about – -

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Turning_Tools___Easy_Wood_Tools?Args=

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12295 posts in 2793 days


#2 posted 07-12-2011 09:49 PM

I would agree with Rich…

I would add that it is better to buy a few quality tools as opposed to a less expensive set… I have and like Sorby as a brand. But as Rich said I would try a carbide tool until I was willing to make the commitement to getting a approprate grinder and sharpening jig such as a wolverine.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1389 days


#3 posted 07-12-2011 09:52 PM

I would also agree with Rich and Wayne. I wouldn’t run out and buy a Tormek with all the trimmings but a Wolverine jig can be had for a reasonable price. For lathe tools, I have mostly Sorby’s but I like Thompson the best.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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WayneC

12295 posts in 2793 days


#4 posted 07-12-2011 09:59 PM

Thinking about a new lathe, get the carbide tool, some pen kits, pen mandril, etc. get addicted with some nice positive results and go from there. : ^ )

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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SCOTSMAN

5440 posts in 2281 days


#5 posted 07-12-2011 10:30 PM

Please get yourself a decent set of hss chisels.Please don’t buy the cheap carbon steel ones please get the right ones from the go get.I bought and still buy Robert sorby but I also have record ,crown, henry taylor, etc they are all good and also learn to sharpen them it’s not difficult I wish you were nearer friednd I’d gladly spend some time showing you all I learned Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Chris

1867 posts in 2687 days


#6 posted 07-12-2011 11:03 PM

I will say this about Turning tools:

If you want to get a quick start in turning you might want to look into Easy Wood turning tools. I have the Rougher and the hollower. They are very well thought out and are a joy to work with. They do NOT require sharpening as they use Carbide inserts.

Otherwise, Get a nice basic set of tools like these Sorby's or tools of equal quality but also budget for a slow speed grinder and jig to sharpen them. Not to mention the time to navigate the learning curve. I started with this set and still use them today and get fantastic results.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

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ChefHDAN

381 posts in 1545 days


#7 posted 07-12-2011 11:13 PM

Thanks ya’ll, as a chef, I’m sharpenin’ mad when it comes to my tools and manage to keep most of my planes & chisels sharp with waterstones, and slips, which I have in abundance.

Sorry Rich, I forgot I was logged into the Pro side of the site; here’s the open listing for these Crown chisels;
http://woodworker.com/fullpres.asp?PARTNUM=142-607
To my inexperienced eye it seems a decent set of the HSS as Scotsman described for $120

As the Sorby chisels are quite pricy, (I totally believe in getting what you pay for), what profiles should I evaluate for first purchases, since the $300+ set is outside my budget, (read, wife is still pissed about the lathe to begin with)

-- Sssshhhh, I'm pretending to be working

View lew's profile

lew

10100 posts in 2451 days


#8 posted 07-13-2011 02:45 AM

I have some Crown turning tools and they are very serviceable.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12295 posts in 2793 days


#9 posted 07-13-2011 03:07 AM

I would agree on Crown, but would still point you back to the advise related to carbide insert tools. Also sharpening turning tools is much different that sharpening planes and chisels. You will need a slow speed grinder and probably special jigs to sharpen standard turning tools…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1770 days


#10 posted 07-13-2011 03:55 AM

I’m going to step back in and comment on slow speed grinders. You will find that there is not a consensus on this subject. Slow speed grinders cost more and some opine that they are not necessary. They say you can use a regular speed grinder (which costs less).

INO – If you are using the older and/or cheaper carbon steel chisels you have to be very concerned about over heating the chisel and you really need a slow speed grinder. That’s not so true with High Speed Steel (HSS). With HSS, you can probably “get away with” a standard speed grinder. However, you are still probably a little better off with a slow speed grinder.

Of course with carbide tipped chisels, you don’t need any grinder.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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WayneC

12295 posts in 2793 days


#11 posted 07-13-2011 06:03 AM

I was thinking slow speed for a beginner to hopefully reduce chance of overheating tools. It can be done freehand, but again probably not recommended for a beginner.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Chris

1867 posts in 2687 days


#12 posted 07-13-2011 02:09 PM

I use a slow speed grinder from Woodcraft with the Wolverine Jigs. This was worked wonderfully for years now.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1389 days


#13 posted 07-13-2011 02:50 PM

I bought an 80 grit 1 inch x 8 inch stone at ACE yesterday for $15.00. It’s got an adapter to accommodate many axle diameters. With a tupperware bucket, a small motor, and some creativity, I bet you could make a slow speed wetgrinder for cheap.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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ChefHDAN

381 posts in 1545 days


#14 posted 07-13-2011 03:52 PM

I’ve got got a delta shopmaster GR050 that will do slow & wet grinding, and could eventually look to get jigs and better stones for my 8” bench grinder, but I’m more interested in the necessary chisel profiles to purchase to evaluate if I should keep this lathe or perhaps flip it for $$$ towards a smaller one that will take less of the footprint. After a skew & a parting chisel what gets the most work on your lathe

Grizzly G-1174 Copy Lathe

-- Sssshhhh, I'm pretending to be working

View Steve Branam's profile

Steve Branam

10 posts in 1327 days


#15 posted 07-14-2011 01:54 PM

I have a list of worthwhile YouTube videos in this post on my blog, down near the end. My turning skills have been pretty poor, but I found watching these very instructional, and was able to get significant improvements. Peter Galbert’s other videos are worth watching as well.

-- Steve, mostly hand tools. See my woodworking blog at http://www.CloseGrain.com

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