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Any luck converting a bench plane or coffin smoother into a scrub plane?

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Forum topic by Brett posted 07-11-2011 08:06 PM 1516 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

660 posts in 2146 days


07-11-2011 08:06 PM

Has anyone had much success converting a bench plane (like a #4 Stanley Bailey) or a coffin smoother into a scrub plane? How well do they work compared to purpose-made scrub planes like those built by Stanley, Veritas, LN, or Emmerich?

-- More tools, fewer machines.


7 replies so far

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3126 days


#1 posted 07-11-2011 08:42 PM

I have heard of guys converting a #5 jack plane into a scrub … as I recall, all they did was camber both sides of the iron. Never tried it, though.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#2 posted 07-11-2011 09:39 PM

Sure! We’ve been talking about this recently, I think in “handplanes of your dreams”. Mads, I think, had the best cambering jig. I haven’t had much success properly cambering blades, even in my #40. The guys are putting gentle chamfers on #5’s with great success, apparently. Check with Wayne and Dan; I think they’ve both done it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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canadianchips

2349 posts in 2460 days


#3 posted 07-11-2011 10:07 PM

I converted this “No name” 3 years ago. It works well, I did put a larger handle on it, my hands were to large for the original handle. No chipbreaker, easy to convert.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#4 posted 07-11-2011 10:39 PM

Chips, I think I’ve got this same little no name. I might camber the blade after seeing yours:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

8302 posts in 3111 days


#5 posted 07-11-2011 11:42 PM

Scrub planes are usually narrower than standard bench planes. The
narrower cut helps you cut deeper with greater ease.

I have a no-name scrub plane myself, similar to the one above. I don’t
recall if the iron was cambered when I got it, but it has only a rudimentary,
non-adjustable frog, no chip-breaker, and the same sort of lever cap
as the plane above. I think these were common – and you could
use them as a scrub or carpentry plane easily enough.

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3560 days


#6 posted 07-12-2011 12:29 AM

My recommendation is a #5 or #6 with a cambered blade. Also you could use a transitional jack plane for this type of work. Some folks are anti scrub plane from the perspective of it taking too rough of a cut…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Loren

8302 posts in 3111 days


#7 posted 07-12-2011 01:16 AM

I’m no Luddite – when I need to scrub a big slab I use a screaming hand-held
planer. The skill is the same actually, it’s really about your eye and sense
of what flat is and feeling the balance of the tool. I’ve cambered blades
on electric planers too.

I flattened a lot of boards by hand when I was starting out. I got in real
good shape, but I got over the romantic idealism about it. Like Bob Dylan,
I may have lost my soul when I went electric, but it was so much easier
I never looked back.

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