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A quick question about handplane restoration

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Forum topic by Greg In Maryland posted 07-10-2011 02:52 PM 1015 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Greg In Maryland

391 posts in 1635 days


07-10-2011 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: handplane restoration

Hi

I am in the middle of restoring a Stanley number 3 and a number 4. Do most folks flatten the sole and then reapply the jappaning (paint) or paint and then flatten the sole?

Also, I have read that you should flatten the sole with the frog, blade, chipbreaker and cap installed. Is there any merit to this?

Thanks.


11 replies so far

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1159 days


#1 posted 07-10-2011 03:18 PM

As a user, I never repaint. If I wanted to paint, it would be the last thing done to the plane. Never paint areas where the frog sits, or the blade. And, you should definitely flatten the bottom with the blade, cap iron, and lever cap in place—but with the blade fully retracted.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15693 posts in 2855 days


#2 posted 07-10-2011 03:35 PM

Yes to flattening with everything assembled. I paint last, although I can’t think of a reason why you couldn’t paint first, flatten after.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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WayneC

12268 posts in 2734 days


#3 posted 07-10-2011 04:43 PM

Agree. Flatten frog and everything assembled. I am also not a fan of repainting/japanning planes…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View jamesicus's profile

jamesicus

132 posts in 1329 days


#4 posted 07-10-2011 11:58 PM

I also do not re-paint antique tools. I occasionally touch up small paint chipped areas using a black magic marker for appearance sake.

James

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1330 days


#5 posted 07-11-2011 12:22 AM

Agree with all above. Flatten the sole with the plane setup like it’s ready to cut, just with the blade withdrawn. That’ll make the theoretical flatness functional flatness. I paint planes, but I probably shouldn’t. All mine are users and sometimes I like them better reJapanned; sometimes not.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

14916 posts in 1205 days


#6 posted 07-11-2011 02:06 AM

If the plane’s are common 3 and 4, and the japanning is bad, I don’t see a problem painting. I typically paint first, but as charlie said, there’s not a reason behind it. I wouldn’t paint a type 1 or 2. I agree with flatten with everything together.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Broglea

665 posts in 1728 days


#7 posted 07-11-2011 03:50 AM

You can paint before or after. Its up to your preferance. I’ve done both. It all depends. I agree with everyone else. Flatten fully assembled with blade retracted.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1277 days


#8 posted 07-11-2011 03:53 AM

Timely advice and all agree, too. Great question.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

391 posts in 1635 days


#9 posted 07-12-2011 03:21 AM

Thanks guys.

I would say that there was less than 40% of the japanning left after the electrolysis bath, so I decided to take it all off and paint it hot pink. It takes a strong man to paint his tool hot pink.

These are intended to be worker bees in my shop and restoration teaching aids, so I wanted to break them down completely and start all over.

Cheers

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1277 days


#10 posted 07-12-2011 03:24 AM

So who did you get to paint it, then… lol j/k I’m just sayin’

I was thinking that more of a khaki / mauve camo might inspire a more manly motiff… ;=)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6928 posts in 1551 days


#11 posted 07-12-2011 04:33 AM

Blue painter’s tape and a razor blade are great for masking off areas NOT to be painted, as listed above. FWIW, I peel the tape after spraying but BEFORE it dries.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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