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Examples of resin glue and where to buy, please

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Forum topic by Neophyte posted 07-22-2018 07:43 PM 664 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Neophyte

34 posts in 2559 days


07-22-2018 07:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glue resin glue glue for plywood

Friends,
I recently posted a question in another forum regarding glueing plywood to plywood and a consistent recommendation was to use resin (or plastic resin) glue. I looked this up but need help figuring out which glue to buy and where – preferably locally available even at the orange or blue big box stores.
Are Liquid Nails and Dynagrip such products?
Thanks in advance
Marc

-- Marc, NY


19 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1153 posts in 1019 days


#1 posted 07-22-2018 07:53 PM

No, construction adhesive is not plastic resin glue. Do a Google search for the unlikely topic of “plastic resin glue” and you will find the information you need.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1486 posts in 365 days


#2 posted 07-22-2018 07:55 PM

this product contains ZERO formaldehyde – that is where the health concerns
came from. the old two part resorcinol glue that caused many health issues
is not made any longer in the USA .

I called the DAP technical rep last month about the formaldehyde issue and the
guy said that NONE of DAP products contain formaldehyde – at all.
so I know this to be a true and verified fact.

.

there is also another Resin Glue called CASCAMITE that is used in boat building. A little more difficult to find.
one is for smooth joints, non-gap filling and another type is for rough joints that is gap filling.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

190 posts in 733 days


#3 posted 07-22-2018 07:59 PM

They are probably recommending something like DAP Weldwood. Comes in a powder and you mix it when you are ready to use it. Long open time and very still so it is great for bent laminations. Never seen it in a box store though.
Liquid Nails and Dynagrip are construction adhesives, generally polyurethane based. They would certainly work for gluing plywood to plywood, but I don’t know why they would be any benefit to them over regular PVA wood glue. If you are just doubling up plywood for a bench top or something I am not sure there would be a huge benefit to something like Weldwood either. What are you building?

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

319 posts in 3921 days


#4 posted 07-22-2018 08:03 PM

Here is a website with info on plastic resin glue. I would warn my former students of safety concerns in handling the material. This involved ventilation, respirator and skin contact issues.

https://www.christinedemerchant.com/adhesive-glue-urea-formaldehyde.html

-- Wuddoc

View Neophyte's profile

Neophyte

34 posts in 2559 days


#5 posted 07-22-2018 08:17 PM



They are probably recommending something like DAP Weldwood. Comes in a powder and you mix it when you are ready to use it. Long open time and very still so it is great for bent laminations. Never seen it in a box store though.
Liquid Nails and Dynagrip are construction adhesives, generally polyurethane based. They would certainly work for gluing plywood to plywood, but I don t know why they would be any benefit to them over regular PVA wood glue. If you are just doubling up plywood for a bench top or something I am not sure there would be a huge benefit to something like Weldwood either. What are you building?

- RobHannon

I am building table tops for bistro tables. My question referred to plywood warping and several people suggested using non-water based glues. Here is my earlier post:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/282226

-- Marc, NY

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1881 posts in 2001 days


#6 posted 07-22-2018 08:37 PM

Wuddoc has given you good advise. It pretty toxic stuff.
I stopped using it because the glue lines are very hard
I think it will work if you can follow all the advice given.
Such as even glue spread flat clamping surface.

-- Aj

View jbay's profile

jbay

2891 posts in 1102 days


#7 posted 07-22-2018 10:10 PM

Unibond 800 is good
Dap Weldwood is Ok

But just to put my 2 cents in, Titebond II is all you need. (Apply it with a roller.)

No matter what you use, it will need to be clamped to a flat surface in order to be flat.

How did you clamp the first one you made that warped?

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

955 posts in 3286 days


#8 posted 07-22-2018 10:41 PM



But just to put my 2 cents in, Titebond II is all you need. (Apply it with a roller.)
- jbay

Another 2 cents.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5986 posts in 2468 days


#9 posted 07-23-2018 12:24 AM

That Weldwood is amazingly strong glue. Probably as strong as anything out there. They recommend mixing it with cold water, in my experience luke warm is much easier.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2583 days


#10 posted 07-23-2018 01:46 AM

Ask the guys making the recommendation. No second guessing that way.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Neophyte's profile

Neophyte

34 posts in 2559 days


#11 posted 07-23-2018 03:42 PM



Unibond 800 is good
Dap Weldwood is Ok

But just to put my 2 cents in, Titebond II is all you need. (Apply it with a roller.)

No matter what you use, it will need to be clamped to a flat surface in order to be flat.

How did you clamp the first one you made that warped?

- jbay

There were two pieces roughly 4’ x 2’, one 3/4” thick and the other 1/2”. Used regular wood glue, clamped the margins all around and used screws for the center. Trimmed to size on table saw, got two table tops.

You also gave a very thoughtful answer to my original question in a different forum. In addition to the problems identified so far (unequal plywood thickness, perhaps excessive glue) I want to add that I did not use a flat surface for reference as the glue dried. I had them dry on top of some 2×4 to allow room for the clamps. I also wonder if the pieces need to be smaller when glued as evidently with the 4’ x 2’ pieces there is a large center area that is only “clamped” by screws
Thanks
Marc

-- Marc, NY

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1486 posts in 365 days


#12 posted 07-23-2018 04:33 PM

Marc – to reiterate again, I personally feel that when two or more panels are glued
together, and clamps are applied all the way around the edges, it forces any excess glue
to the center of the panels, “possibly” creating a larger wet glue mass that “could”
result in more moisture in the center than the outside edges where the clamps are.
for a trial assembly – put two drywall screws in the center to prevent slippage, put on a flat floor,
and stack a lot of weight evenly on the panels and see how that works for you. (skip the clamps).
this would be for any liquid adhesive or epoxy. not contact cement or construction adhesive.
discussing the adhesive factors over and over is just arguing semantics.
wishing you the best of success in finding what works best for you.

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Neophyte's profile

Neophyte

34 posts in 2559 days


#13 posted 07-23-2018 04:52 PM



Marc – to reiterate again, I personally feel that when two or more panels are glued
together, and clamps are applied all the way around the edges, it forces any excess glue
to the center of the panels, “possibly” creating a larger wet glue mass that “could”
result in more moisture in the center than the outside edges where the clamps are.
for a trial assembly – put two drywall screws in the center to prevent slippage, put on a flat floor,
and stack a lot of weight evenly on the panels and see how that works for you. (skip the clamps).
this would be for any liquid adhesive or epoxy. not contact cement or construction adhesive.
discussing the adhesive factors over and over is just arguing semantics.
wishing you the best of success in finding what works best for you.

.

.

- John Smith


Thanks for your feedback and I appreciate that you have followed these two threads.
I think the point that glue in the center of the boards dries slower is very important
Since your initial recommendation I have been looking for ways to build them that way
I still need to decide on the right materials for this project whether it will be all plywood or a combination MDF + plywood. I understand now to use same thickness material
Marc

-- Marc, NY

View jbay's profile

jbay

2891 posts in 1102 days


#14 posted 07-23-2018 07:02 PM

Your wayyy over thinking this.
Cut them to 2×2 before putting together.
Apply the glue with a roller, Clamp the things together, there is going to be no mass that collects in the middle.
Don’t worry about what speed the glue in the middle dries at, just clamp them and leave them over night.
The only other thing I would do would be to add some screws to the middle area before clamping. The screws will clamp the center and keep the tops from sliding around.
I would clamp 4 or 5 at a time…..

(ON A FLAT SURFACE) lol

That’s all I have to say, I’m out!
Good Luck

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1972 posts in 2192 days


#15 posted 07-23-2018 07:37 PM

Clamping cauls will put even pressure across the surface

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