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Need help trimming ugly door in the corner of a room

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Forum topic by weekendwoodguy posted 07-22-2018 03:20 PM 1340 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 196 days


07-22-2018 03:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question trimming remodeling

Ok my apologies, I’m not sure I’m posting in the correct forum but I saw a similar question in this forum from a while back so I posted it here.

My problem is this…I’m trimming a room in my house but I’m not sure how to approach this door. The door will be painted and fit with a very simple trim but the hinges are nearly touching the adjacent wall. Normally I would place the door trim just behind the hinges leaving a small reveal but in this case that would mean putting the casing on the adjacent wall leaving what I think would be an ugly gap. And also the top casing would need to wrap around the corner. Two ideas I had to deal with this were (1) not trimming it at all on the left and just painting the left door jam to match the trim but I think that would look a bit unbalanced. Or (2) Placing the left casing tight to the wall and just notching out for the hinges so they don’t bind.

So I’m wondering how would you trim the left side of this door? Any ideas?

Untitled


15 replies so far

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

171 posts in 2759 days


#1 posted 07-22-2018 04:54 PM

Trim the top and right side the same as other doors in your house, no trim on the left side.

-- .. heyoka ..

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JCamp

819 posts in 699 days


#2 posted 07-22-2018 05:02 PM

There is another option. Move the wall on that side of the door a couple foot over so you be able to put a piece of trim there. Lol.
I’d elect to not trim that side as well. When the door is open no one will notice. After a while you won’t even see it

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1149 posts in 2100 days


#3 posted 07-22-2018 09:07 PM



There is another option. Move the wall on that side of the door a couple foot over so you be able to put a piece of trim there. Lol.
I’d elect to not trim that side as well. When the door is open no one will notice. After a while you won’t even see it

- JCamp

I actually thought about moving the door in the other direction.

You could trim out the top and right hand side and then decide what looks best for the left hand side. Either no trim at all, or a small piece between the hinges and the wall that is the thickness of the inner edge of the two main trim pieces.

Is that the main door in and out of the room or is it for a closet? If it is the latter you could make it a bit narrower and trim out the left hand edge in the usual manner.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

347 posts in 1251 days


#4 posted 07-22-2018 10:44 PM

Can you tolerate the door being a couple of inches narrower? If so, it wouldn’t be too difficult to add a 2×4 which would move the left jam to the right. This together with the thickness of the casing and shims and you will have space for some narrow trim. Make sure the left stile inside the door has enough width to allow for trimming.

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 196 days


#5 posted 07-22-2018 11:27 PM

Hmm interesting thoughts. I hadn’t ever really considered making the jamb smaller and trimming the door. That actually makes a lot of sense and easy enough to pull off but I’m not sure I want to get that involved with this door at least for now. This is just a door to a covered porch and I’ve got a ton of other home projects on my plate with more priority at the moment. I think I’ll try just trimming out the right side and seeing how I like it first and go from there. I’ll post a pic once I get to it but don’t hold your breath lol, my in-laws are in town and my 4-month-old is running the show at the moment. Thanks for the input.

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Jeff

471 posts in 3342 days


#6 posted 07-22-2018 11:42 PM

Not sure how much room is on the wall side. How about 1/4 round above, below and in between the hinges?

View clin's profile

clin

929 posts in 1144 days


#7 posted 07-22-2018 11:54 PM

I like things to look like they were done on purpose. If this were a room in my house, I’d move the whole door over and make it they way it would have been built to begin with. But, knowing it is going to a porch and you have better things to do, I’m with the others that say to just not trim that side. I certainly think no trim would look better than wrapping trim to the adjacent wall.

That door doesn’t look real wide to begin with, so while narrowing the door is a clever way to make it look right, I think it might be oddly narrow for a door to a porch. I assume there would be a lot of people coming and going to this porch. Having to grease up uncle Bob to push him through the door might be kind of awkward during your kids 1st birthday party.

-- Clin

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 196 days


#8 posted 07-23-2018 12:02 AM



Having to grease up uncle Bob to push him through the door might be kind of awkward during your kids 1st birthday party.

- clin

Lol yes that would be a bit awkward. That is the other reason I don’t want to mess with moving/shrinking the jam. Right behind this door is a stairway that leads to our back door. It is sometimes hard to get things in and out of our house as it is and I’d hate to make the opening even narrower if I can avoid it.


Not sure how much room is on the wall side. How about 1/4 round above, below and in between the hinges?

- Jeff

There’s about 1/2” between the door and the wall on the left side.

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 196 days


#9 posted 07-31-2018 09:19 PM

Finally got this door trim project complete. I settled on leaving the left side of the door without trim and I think it looks just fine in this context; the painted jam gives it the enough “trim” on that side. Moving the door would certainly have looked a bit better but this was an easier solution. Thanks again for the advice.

Untitled

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

347 posts in 1251 days


#10 posted 07-31-2018 10:02 PM

You did a nice job of dealing with a difficult situation.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8433 posts in 2725 days


#11 posted 07-31-2018 10:53 PM

Good job!

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1149 posts in 2100 days


#12 posted 07-31-2018 11:12 PM

Hey! That turned out great. A really difficult situation to deal with.

I can’t help but offer one additional suggestion. This is an easy one and you can try it without doing any irreversible damage.

Could you add some simple rectangular stock pieces on the left side? Just the width of the bottom of the upper trim piece and thick enough to cover the gap between the door and the wall. They would be attached to the left wall and would come out the thickness of the top molding piece. You would need to cut out around the hinges. It would cover the existing gap on the left and would give a much more finished look to the project.

Just a thought.

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 196 days


#13 posted 08-01-2018 03:27 PM



Hey! That turned out great. A really difficult situation to deal with.

I can t help but offer one additional suggestion. This is an easy one and you can try it without doing any irreversible damage.

Could you add some simple rectangular stock pieces on the left side? Just the width of the bottom of the upper trim piece and thick enough to cover the gap between the door and the wall. They would be attached to the left wall and would come out the thickness of the top molding piece. You would need to cut out around the hinges. It would cover the existing gap on the left and would give a much more finished look to the project.

Just a thought.

- Kazooman

An excellent suggestion. I was thinking of something similar but I’m not sure how I would handle the bottom of the door where the floor trim meets the jam. I guess the best way would be to use a rotary tool to cut the trim back a touch and slip the “rectangular block” between the floor trim and the jamb. I definitely think it would look a bit more slick although part of me doesn’t care given the context. This room is anything but polished looking lol.

View theart's profile

theart

49 posts in 702 days


#14 posted 08-01-2018 04:04 PM


An excellent suggestion. I was thinking of something similar but I m not sure how I would handle the bottom of the door where the floor trim meets the jam. I guess the best way would be to use a rotary tool to cut the trim back a touch and slip the “rectangular block” between the floor trim and the jamb. I definitely think it would look a bit more slick although part of me doesn t care given the context. This room is anything but polished looking lol.

- weekendwoodguy

I think that visually, you could get most of the way there by just extending the jamb paint out onto the wall a bit.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

793 posts in 2107 days


#15 posted 08-01-2018 07:45 PM



Can you tolerate the door being a couple of inches narrower? If so, it wouldn t be too difficult to add a 2×4 which would move the left jam to the right. This together with the thickness of the casing and shims and you will have space for some narrow trim. Make sure the left stile inside the door has enough width to allow for trimming.

- bilyo

This is what I would do. Move it, or make it narrower.

-- I'd like to see a forklift lift a crate of forks. It'd be so damn literal!

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