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Forum topic by Dan Krager posted 07-21-2018 01:08 AM 509 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan Krager

4163 posts in 2383 days


07-21-2018 01:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question jig lathe drill press router tablesaw sander woodburning

This is a group for Supershop owners to share information about their machines. I used to be a dealer for the Fox Supershop designed and built by Tony Fox operations and one has been in my shop since 1980, a year after they were introduced in 1979.

A lot of information has already been shared.

Many knock offs have been produced and most are faithful reproductions of the original, with the exception of the power lateral feed. Many parts will be interchangeable (withing machining tolerances). There are no known caches of parts any more. As of 2018 Smithy has stopped taking calls about Super Shops.

Let’s share our information, experiences, setups. We can offer machines for sale or point to sites trying to sell one. If you find or have a stash of parts, please post here.
From the manual:

One at work:

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com You can allways find three nuts to secure the four bolts you need.


7 replies so far

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Handtooler

1626 posts in 2280 days


#1 posted 07-21-2018 01:38 AM

Certainly looks a lot like my ShopSmith MK 5 purchased in 1974 and still in operation today

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@outlook.com

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Dan Krager

4163 posts in 2383 days


#2 posted 07-21-2018 02:12 AM

Other than the functions the machine performs, the Fox Super Shop has very little in common with Shopsmith. Tony Fox was an engineer at Magna Engineering, the birthplace of the Shopsmith, and they came to a parting of ways over future designs. Tony designed the Super Shop to be heavy enough for metal work because he wanted both DIY markets, the woodworkers and the metal workers. The problematic Reeves pulleys used by Shopsmith were his pet peeve, so none of the Super Shops have them. Variable speed is achieved by constant torque electronic controls of a 110V/220V DC motor. It also has powered lateral feed which Shopsmith never considered. In 1975 I proposed a lateral feed idea to Shopsmith, sending them full size mechanical drawings of how they could do it economically, but they politely said “no thanks”. The Super Shop outweighs the Shopsmith by nearly 400 lbs. Having owned and used Super Shops and Shopsmith machines side by side, I can testify that they both have limitations, but both are worthy machines. The Shopsmith organization is strong enough to have survived some very trying times, to their credit. Shopsmith people and machines are welcome here too!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com You can allways find three nuts to secure the four bolts you need.

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Handtooler

1626 posts in 2280 days


#3 posted 07-21-2018 11:19 AM

Thanks Dan for your very detailed explanation in their differences. Excellent write up.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@outlook.com

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ArtMann

1081 posts in 964 days


#4 posted 07-21-2018 09:26 PM

Your interest group might be rather small. I have never heard of the machine and I have been woodworking since 1976.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3532 posts in 2137 days


#5 posted 07-21-2018 10:29 PM

I have a Shopsmith that I use for all kinds of sanding… flat sander, pneumatic drum sander, spindle sander and also as a lathe.

Not long ago, I used a Super shop and was very impressed. It is a very sturdy solid machine and with I had one.

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woodbutcherbynight

5559 posts in 2557 days


#6 posted 07-22-2018 01:30 AM

Interesting topic. I had no idea about the Super Shop. Have seen a Shopsmith at a guys shop but never used one myself.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Dan Krager

4163 posts in 2383 days


#7 posted 07-22-2018 01:58 AM

One of the setups I experimented with was power cutting dowels. Notice that I’m using a custom tail stock which holds a hollow shaft with R-8 collet taper and threaded like the head stock spindle. This makes tooling setups very convenient. There’s a much better method I think, and some day I’ll get around to experimenting with it. The three jaw chuck on the tail is stationary (don’t get excited about key left in chuck) and fitted with wooden jaws that hold the round section of the stick after the cutter. The little chuck on the headstock is a four jaw that grips the square stick. When in operation, the headstock is cranked toward the tailstock while the stick is spinning against the cutter. The round stock exits through the hollow tail stock tube, which also holds it from flopping like a fish out of water.

The middle and last picture are from the back side. The middle picture shows the stationary cutter in the lathe tool rest. This tool holder was an optional accessory available in the day.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com You can allways find three nuts to secure the four bolts you need.

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