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Forum topic by Jeffery Mullen posted 07-08-2011 09:39 AM 1772 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeffery Mullen

323 posts in 1513 days


07-08-2011 09:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tip tablesaw

My barrings went out and my motor seized up, boy was it loud and bad sounding . I took my table saw apart and took the motor out and took the outer shell off and found out why my motor stopped. The front barring mount was shot and fell apart. I went down to a alternator and battery shop and they had just what I needed to replace the old barrings on the motor shaft. I got the rest of the old messed up one off and put the new one on and remembered what went to what to get the motor and table saw put back together. I really didn’t know what I was getting into at first but once I got the table saw apart and the motor apart it was a easy $ 4.00 fix compared to throwing the table saw away and buying a new one. This was a all day project for me and a new learning skill . No one was with me when I did all this so I guess I was really motivated to get my saw back up and running again. I figured what do I got to loose on this with no tips from any one as the table saw that wouldn’t run anyways. Don’t give up hope if your table saw gives up on you. It’s not to hard to fix one. I didn’t have the money at this time to replace my table saw but had the whole day to figure this one out and I am glad I did.


9 replies so far

View agallant's profile

agallant

432 posts in 1581 days


#1 posted 07-08-2011 03:17 PM

I would have totally capitalised on the incident and told my wife that my saw died and it was time to buy the unisaw that I have been wanting, It will last much longer :)

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1388 days


#2 posted 07-08-2011 03:26 PM

I’m with Agallant, I’d be describing an inflated repair cost as a downpayment toward a new Powermatic. My hat’s off to you for staying honest;) It’s alway fun to learn how to fix something.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Jeffery Mullen's profile

Jeffery Mullen

323 posts in 1513 days


#3 posted 07-09-2011 07:26 AM

Thanks Agallant and Bertha ! I really don’t have much money right now so if I can make somthing out of somthing for my use I do . If I can fix somthing I will . When a person dosn’t have a choice but to fix somthing like my table saw or not having one at all , it would be to fix it so I can move on with my love and joy of making cuts with wood.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5517 posts in 2070 days


#4 posted 07-09-2011 01:21 PM

It’s good to see someone make an attempt to fix something that they didn’t want to replace….we’re largely a throw away society. While I fully understand the “justification angle” with my wife, sometimes it’s just not feasible to spend the money when the time comes.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1217 days


#5 posted 07-09-2011 04:10 PM

Good for you. I love that feeling of accomplishment coupled with rugged independence!!! Great repair at a great price. And, yes, I would have taken the opportunity to upgrade to a cabinet saw. Buy used and fix it up. It’s a lot cheaper. Now, the bad news is, you’ll pay as much used as for a lower end new—but, in the end, a heavier duty machine should provide many more years of service. Oh, and be picky!!

Congrats on saving money and developing confidence in a new skill!

View JimDaddyO's profile

JimDaddyO

288 posts in 1774 days


#6 posted 07-09-2011 04:26 PM

Congrats Jeff!! I know how it is to have to keep old things running, including myself some days.

-- I still have all my fingers

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2157 days


#7 posted 07-09-2011 04:39 PM

I am glad to see it was fixed. The problem with the tools and society today is that we live in a disposible society. If you really think about it what do we currently own and use everyday that will be here for the next generation?

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1965 days


#8 posted 07-09-2011 04:55 PM

I agree with MedicKen….and I’ll add my kudos for a job well done.

With all the cheap junk these days….it seems that all I do is fix something….or find a work around for something broke…..either learn to fix things…or you will quickly spend your entire budget replacing all the broken stuff.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2877 posts in 1938 days


#9 posted 07-09-2011 05:04 PM

I congratulate you for fixing the saw. In today’s world of “toss it”, it’s nice to know there are people who still fix rather than toss. Fifty + years ago, everyone fixed things. The knowledge gained is most valuable and the satisfaction is another plus.

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