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Slab table discoloring

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Forum topic by Graft21 posted 07-19-2018 07:44 PM 341 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Graft21

21 posts in 1287 days


07-19-2018 07:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: live edge slab outdoor table

Hey guys. Hoping for some help on this. I recently made this live edge honey locust outdoor table for a client. I just received these pictures. I am assuming it is some mold/mildew but wanted to be sure. Before surfacing the slab, there was a bit of this on there but most came off from sanding/planing. The top is finished with General finishes exterior 450. Is there anything I can do to resolve this problem?

Thanks in advance


7 replies so far

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

139 posts in 142 days


#1 posted 07-19-2018 07:57 PM

Graft21,
That’s not staining its “patina”! (just kidding)

Actually, what probably happened was that there was still some residual moisture left in the wood when you finished it and the mildew is still getting some air through the finish or through a nearby unfinished surface. I would take this up with the manufacturer and see if they can help with remediation expense and an explanation of what happened.

I have never used this product but here is what woodcraft says in their add;
“What do you do when you’ve built an Adirondack chair, planter’s bench, trellis or something else for your porch or patio and paint is out of the question? Do you want something clear and tough, but are pressed for time? Now you have a choice!General Finishes’ Exterior 450 is fortified with UV absorbers to minimize fading and built-in mildewcides to help retard the growth of mold and fungus. Plus, Exterior 450 is fast – it’s ready to sand in 1 hour (under ideal conditions) which means you can be done finishing and using your project the same day.”

They are clearly claiming that it kills mildew. Mildewcides! And you clearly have mildew.

Good luck with this. It’s always embarrassing and frustrating when you have done your best and one of your vendors lets you down.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1717 posts in 1942 days


#2 posted 07-19-2018 08:30 PM

I don’t think your finish let you down at all. That’s just the early wood I doubt there’s anything you can do to keep it from rotting outside.
I bet you already know what you gotta do.
I’m not going to even say it.
It a very nice looking table even with the discolored

-- Aj

View HonestlyMediocre's profile

HonestlyMediocre

22 posts in 94 days


#3 posted 07-19-2018 10:16 PM


.
I bet you already know what you gotta do.
I’m not going to even say it.
- Aj2

For those of us that don’t know, what does he need to do? Cut out the early wood and lose the live edge?

View Graft21's profile

Graft21

21 posts in 1287 days


#4 posted 07-19-2018 11:17 PM

I’m hoping that he’s implying sanding the finish off and either treating the staining or trying to sand it off.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1717 posts in 1942 days


#5 posted 07-19-2018 11:39 PM

Yes cut it off , don’t make a dead straight cut make it wavy it will look just like a live edge. Ya just cannot put sap outdoors that will rot and stop it from rotting.

-- Aj

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

139 posts in 142 days


#6 posted 07-20-2018 02:04 AM

If you sand off the finish, you can bleach the remaining board. You don’t care about the coloration with the bleach but it will kill the mildew so use a diluted solution…it is a living organism…and it must die! The spores were already in the wood when you started your work. Also, I am not convinced that the problem is because of the live edge other than the fact that it is more porous. There is no guarantee that removing the edge will solve the problem.

You can get rid of the discoloration with sanding or stain. Leave the board to dry and watch it for a while before you re-seal it. It would be awesome if you knew someone with a kiln but those are hard to find.

I would consider using an epoxy based finish for the new sealer. Or maybe a well applied spar poly.

I will be interested to see how this turns out but you are clearly a solid craftsman and I’m sure you got this.
Cheers,
Tim

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View enazle's profile

enazle

66 posts in 152 days


#7 posted 07-20-2018 02:20 AM

When WoodLife was a oil based product you could treat the lumber prior to finishing to prevent mildew under the finish. Now that it is water based, I’m not sure if it will work. Penofin I think also has anti-fungal agents so you may be able to use it as a sealer? The woodlife will prevent the sap wood from rotting out though.

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