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Building Thickness sander - Drum Question

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Forum topic by wildbill001 posted 1114 days ago 3866 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wildbill001

99 posts in 1241 days


1114 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: thickness sander drum sander question homemade

Building a thickness sander based on designs I’ve seen here and on the ‘net’. One thing I rarely, if ever, see mentioned is attachment of the wooddisk to the shaft. Some folks have said that the epoxy/glue they used to glue-up the drum was sufficient to hold to the shaft. Others don’t mention anything about it.

I have a 5/8” shaft, with 5” MDF disks. The disks move easily along the shaft after drilling a 5/8” hole. I can’t help but wonder if I need to somehow “pin” the drum to the shaft to keep it from free-wheeling.

So for those who have gone down this road, How did you attach the disks to the shaft ?

TIA

Bill

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown


16 replies so far

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#1 posted 1114 days ago

I considered making one of these. You could grind a flat into the shaft to engage a long machine screw inserted from the perimeter of the disk. You could also thread the axle and capture the disks with nuts. I was worried about exactly what you’re worrying about; I applaud you for going for it!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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crank49

3338 posts in 1570 days


#2 posted 1114 days ago

Caution! A 5/8” dia shaft is pretty small for the mass you are wanting to spin. across the length most drums need to be; I’m assuming over 20” or so. If it was a metal drum, no problem; the drum itself adds rigidity. Not so much so with wood or MDF. Then, to drill a 1/4” hole through this shaft in three places; I don’t think I want to be standing in the line of fire when this thing revs up.

From what I have read, most of these drums use 5/8” dia. shaft for a 16” to 18” drum. One builder said if he were doing it over, or going any longer, he would use 1”, but didn’t say why.

The link below here is another LJ who did this. His, and 3 or 4 other threads I read, indicate they only attach the drum disks to the shaft with epoxy.
http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#3 posted 1114 days ago

Good point, Cr1. How are the other guys around here doing it?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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wildbill001

99 posts in 1241 days


#4 posted 1114 days ago

Let me clarify. I’m planning on a width of 12”, possibly shorter but certainly no longer.

Bill

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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crank49

3338 posts in 1570 days


#5 posted 1114 days ago

Well, for a 12” drum width, based on other projects I have read, you should be okay.

As far as attaching the disks to the shaft, the epoxy will absolutely adhere to the ID of the disks.
You might want to rough up the surface of the shaft in the area to be glued. Also, you want to be absolutely sure and clean all traces of oil off the shaft before installing in the disks. I have had good results using lacquer thinner as a solvent for this purpose, then follow with acetone.

Good luck, and keep us posted.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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SASmith

1546 posts in 1586 days


#6 posted 1114 days ago

This is how it is done in Shopnotes #86 Vol. 15.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#7 posted 1114 days ago

Thanks SASmith, I’m trying to imagine what that locking wedge does.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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SASmith

1546 posts in 1586 days


#8 posted 1114 days ago

It is to hold the end(s) of the sandpaper.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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wildbill001

99 posts in 1241 days


#9 posted 1114 days ago

Thanks SASmith for the diagram. That’s actually pretty much how I envisioned it.

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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crank49

3338 posts in 1570 days


#10 posted 1114 days ago

Ya’ll did notice that the ShopNotes version uses a 3/4” shaft? and 3/16” pins?

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#11 posted 1114 days ago

Cr1, I was planning on 1” just because the pillowblocks are easy to come by. I tend to agree with Cr1 that I’m probably underestimating the forces generated at the moment arm. I imagine 12 inches of sandpaper meeting wood at relatively high speed could generate a lot of force. I can see the axle twisting off at the pin points. I’m no engineer but I do break a lot of stuff.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View George M's profile

George M

117 posts in 1364 days


#12 posted 1114 days ago

I used a 1” shaft for mine. It also uses MDF disks, but has a 26” capacity, and use the pin system seen in the Shopnotes article. The wedges are to anchor the sandpaper. Instead I used the conversion kit sold by Jet that uses Hook and Loop.
It works well, but if I did it again, I would use an aluminum cylinder rather than MDF.

-- George, Parker Colorado

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#13 posted 1114 days ago

Thanks to all for explaining the wedge to me. I’ll have to look into this JET conversion.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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George M

117 posts in 1364 days


#14 posted 1113 days ago

cr1,
You would have to either turn some aluminum blanks into hubs, or have someone do it for you. The LJ who helped me (Johnz) could do it. He turned the aluminum hubs for my transport rollers. I also believe TomT used an aluminum cylinder for his drum.

-- George, Parker Colorado

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BritBoxmaker

4340 posts in 1635 days


#15 posted 1097 days ago

I used PVA between the discs and Epoxy to glue them to the shaft. One year of constant use later its still intact.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

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