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Painting Plantation Shutters

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Forum topic by GMUGMU posted 07-19-2018 12:39 PM 677 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


07-19-2018 12:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shutters painting

I have completed the first round of shutters. Now it time to paint. My current plan is to use a HPLV siphon sprayer hooked to my air compressor. I’m planning to use Sherwin Williams primer and water-based enamel.

1. Do I need different size nozzles for the primer and enamel?
2. What is the best nozzle size for the painting project?

This is a first for me. Please feel free to correct my primer and paint choices. Further, I have not purchased the sprayer either. Any guidance would be much appreciated.

Many Thanks in Advance
GMUGMU


19 replies so far

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Rich

3895 posts in 794 days


#1 posted 07-19-2018 01:28 PM

Sherwin Williams will have experts who can answer your questions. Talk to the manager at your store. At least at mine, he is knowledgeable about every product they sell and can guide you in the right direction. For instance, you might be better off spraying a lacquer. He or she can advise you. Same thing regarding equipment, viscosities, etc.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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rwe2156

3174 posts in 1685 days


#2 posted 07-19-2018 02:24 PM

+1 on talking to store people. That being said, the guy who was supposed to be “the spray man” at the SW store near me told me I couldn’t spray SW Pro Classic oil based through a gravity fed HVLP gun (not true ;-)

To your question, water based paints generally need a larger tip, and are best applied with a turbine type spray system. However it can be done with a lot of thinning.

Oil based paints are usually sprayed through smaller tips.

I have used quite a bit of SW Pro Classic Enamel in the past with a gravity fed HVLP w/ 1.4mm tip.

It really goes on great but the one big disadvantage to oil base is the dry time. For this reason, I’ve migrated away from OB paint. One big reason is right now the humdity is so high where I live, it takes 48 hrs between coats.

With WB paint you can apply 3 coats easily in one day.

I’ve also got a pretty big plantation shutter project on the list and I’m taking a serious look at the pigmented lacquers at Target Coatings..

Bottom line is you have to play around with whatever you get it to get your thinning figured out and gun adjusted. Practice on a piece of plywood first.

Curious – are you painting the parts separately or after its assembled?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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BroncoBrian

854 posts in 2163 days


#3 posted 07-19-2018 02:41 PM

Agreed as well. Go to SW and ask them. This should be simple. Unless you have 10 or more of these, brushing might be simple enough.

I would not use latex for that project unless there is something applied after. A good exterior oil paint will last much longer and not flake. I don’t care how many people say that oil is hard and some latex paints are as good as oil now. They are not. Painters like them because of clean up and low VOC, but if you want to install and leave the shutters for years, use oil-based paint.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#4 posted 07-19-2018 02:58 PM



+1 on talking to store people. That being said, the guy who was supposed to be “the spray man” at the SW store near me told me I couldn t spray SW Pro Classic oil based through a gravity fed HVLP gun (not true ;-)

To your question, water based paints generally need a larger tip, and are best applied with a turbine type spray system. However it can be done with a lot of thinning.

Oil based paints are usually sprayed through smaller tips.

I have used quite a bit of SW Pro Classic Enamel in the past with a gravity fed HVLP w/ 1.4mm tip.

It really goes on great but the one big disadvantage to oil base is the dry time. For this reason, I ve migrated away from OB paint. One big reason is right now the humdity is so high where I live, it takes 48 hrs between coats.

With WB paint you can apply 3 coats easily in one day.

I ve also got a pretty big plantation shutter project on the list and I m taking a serious look at the pigmented lacquers at Target Coatings..

Bottom line is you have to play around with whatever you get it to get your thinning figured out and gun adjusted. Practice on a piece of plywood first.

Curious – are you painting the parts separately or after its assembled?

- rwe2156

I have assembled them already. All glued up. I would send pic but “photobucket” gives me an error. Im new here. It’s probably operator error

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GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#5 posted 07-19-2018 03:05 PM



Agreed as well. Go to SW and ask them. This should be simple. Unless you have 10 or more of these, brushing might be simple enough.

I would not use latex for that project unless there is something applied after. A good exterior oil paint will last much longer and not flake. I don t care how many people say that oil is hard and some latex paints are as good as oil now. They are not. Painters like them because of clean up and low VOC, but if you want to install and leave the shutters for years, use oil-based paint.

- BroncoBrian

Did I mention that these are bass wood interior shutters? Still need to use oil base?

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GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#6 posted 07-19-2018 03:06 PM

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

854 posts in 2163 days


#7 posted 07-19-2018 03:32 PM


Did I mention that these are bass wood interior shutters? Still need to use oil base?

- GMUGMU

If you did, I did not read it! In that case, Latex is fine and I would spray it as you suggested. Lol. Detail matter, huh?

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

854 posts in 2163 days


#8 posted 07-19-2018 03:33 PM



- GMUGMU

Nice work. I am curious why you built these? Is it more economical or did you want the project? Seems like the scale eof that project would be very time consuming. I needed a houseful of shutters, so I became a seller.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#9 posted 07-19-2018 03:51 PM


- GMUGMU

Nice work. I am curious why you built these? Is it more economical or did you want the project? Seems like the scale eof that project would be very time consuming. I needed a houseful of shutters, so I became a seller.

- BroncoBrian

I have a whole house to do, including two sliding glass doors. It’s a lot of work buy I will save thousands of dollars

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AandCstyle

3179 posts in 2462 days


#10 posted 07-19-2018 09:16 PM

GMU, if you happen to be in northern Virginia, I have a half gallon of white EM6000 that can I will give you. I used it for my shutters and have no further need.

-- Art

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3174 posts in 1685 days


#11 posted 07-19-2018 09:43 PM

Looking good. Did you dowel the rails and stiles?

Where did you source your basswood?

Did you make your own louvers?

Have you thought about an airless electric sprayer? There are Some economical models out there like Graco that seem to get high reviews. Good way to go for latex paint.

They say WB primers are just as good, but I’m a little old school in that I always use oil base primer not mater what.

The BIN shellac based primer is very good, too.

Let us know his the spraying goes. I figured on spraying the louvers prior to assembly.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View GMUGMU's profile

GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#12 posted 07-20-2018 12:13 AM



GMU, if you happen to be in northern Virginia, I have a half gallon of white EM6000 that can I will give you. I used it for my shutters and have no further need.

- AandCstyle

I’m in winter garden florida but thanks just the same. What is EM6000 and how did you apply it? Thanks

View GMUGMU's profile

GMUGMU

9 posts in 152 days


#13 posted 07-20-2018 12:44 AM



Looking good. Did you dowel the rails and stiles?

Where did you source your basswood?

Did you make your own louvers?

Have you thought about an airless electric sprayer? There are Some economical models out there like Graco that seem to get high reviews. Good way to go for latex paint.

They say WB primers are just as good, but I’m a little old school in that I always use oil base primer not mater what.

The BIN shellac based primer is very good, too.

Let us know his the spraying goes. I figured on spraying the louvers prior to assembly.

- rwe2156

I used biscuits for the joints. On another set of windows, I decided to add a center stile. This resulted in some challenges for my skill level. I used dowels for those joints. Turned out nice tho. Ill add a picture.

I went to rockler for the basswood. There’s a store here in town. The boards were 8’L x 4 3/4 and 5 1/4. I also bought the louvers there. They were already shaped and came in 58” lengths.

I’ve heard recommendations for airless, pressure pot and rockler told me that HVLP would shoot latex as well. It’s all a bit confusing. A painter I know recommended the Graco FTx airless gun with a 212 tip.

I’ll update on painting decision and results.

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rwe2156

3174 posts in 1685 days


#14 posted 07-20-2018 09:59 AM

Biscuits are probably OK, but I would consider dowels. You just clamp it up & drill though the outside edge of the stile end into rail. Once you sand and prime the dowel end disappears. Personally I will use this project as for a Domino ;-)

Most people will agree a turbine sprayer is the best way to go for latex paints but they are a bit pricey. If I didn’t want to invest in a turbine system, I would consider some of the electric homeowner type airless sprayers. I used one years ago to paint some doors and it did a very acceptable job. I’ll bet the newer models are even better.

Take a look at the Graco Truecoat models & the Wagner FlexiO. If you don’t have to mess around with thinning Imthink it’s the best way to go.

EM6000 are the water based lacquers I referred to in another post. Target Coatings.

I’m thinking about buying louvers, too. My plan was to resaw 8/4 boards to get 3 louvers per thickness until I found I can buy 12” unfinished louvers for just over $1.00 ea. I’ll have 100’s of them to make so it’s kind of a no brainer.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

597 posts in 945 days


#15 posted 07-20-2018 01:41 PM


GMU, if you happen to be in northern Virginia, I have a half gallon of white EM6000 that can I will give you. I used it for my shutters and have no further need.

- AandCstyle

I m in winter garden florida but thanks just the same. What is EM6000 and how did you apply it? Thanks

- GMUGMU

EM6000 is a water-based lacquer that even a total spraying newbie like myself can manage successfully! Seriously, it’s great stuff. You can see the tinted white version in my project here:

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/387298

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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