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Redoing numbers on old bleachers

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Forum topic by Nels posted 07-18-2018 01:12 PM 560 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nels

43 posts in 1715 days


07-18-2018 01:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig trick pine carving milling woodburning

I have a project that is planning 2,200 linear feet of 2×4’s yellow pine. They are bleacher seats, 3 -2×4’s wide. This is an old school and the seats have numbers on them. There is a number every 18”. The architect wants to keep the “look”. The numbers are 1-9/16” tall. My thoughts run to: hand doing with a Dremell, getting a CNC guy to make templates for a router, and having stamps made.
Any knowledge of doing any of these or other ideas?


11 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1256 posts in 249 days


#1 posted 07-18-2018 02:11 PM

a 45 or 60* V-Bit in a hand-held trim router vs the dremel tool will be neater and quicker.
Yellow Pine has some pretty serious hard grain structure and will make
straight engraved lines a challenge – but very doable free-hand (with a little practice).
hand draw the numbers with a black Sharpie pen first, then just rout the lines.
a template stencil could be used for the drawing part.


.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

787 posts in 637 days


#2 posted 07-18-2018 02:43 PM

I don’t have an opinion on the lettering but if you plane a 2x down your are going from a factory 1.5 inch board down at least another 1/16 or more…. are you sure it will be as structurally sound as before?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 862 days


#3 posted 07-18-2018 03:00 PM

Yeah they might only support a 2,400 lbs student in each seat compared to 2,500 lbs previously.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3352 posts in 676 days


#4 posted 07-18-2018 03:03 PM


I don t have an opinion on the lettering but if you plane a 2x down your are going from a factory 1.5 inch board down at least another 1/16 or more…. are you sure it will be as structurally sound as before?

- JCamp

Given that planing 1/16” from a 1-1/2” board reduces its thickness by just over 4%, that is not going to be significant factor. Also, depending on the age of the boards, they might be thicker than 1-1/2”.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

3352 posts in 676 days


#5 posted 07-18-2018 03:16 PM


I have a project that is planning 2,200 linear feet of 2×4 s yellow pine. They are bleacher seats, 3 -2×4 s wide. This is an old school and the seats have numbers on them. There is a number every 18”. The architect wants to keep the “look”. The numbers are 1-9/16” tall. My thoughts run to: hand doing with a Dremell, getting a CNC guy to make templates for a router, and having stamps made.

2200 linear feet with numbers every 18 inches means you’re re-doing almost 1500 numbers. Even if your post meant all three added up to 2200 feet, that’s still almost 500 numbers. I can’t imagine tackling that with a router, template or not. Do the numbers disappear when you plane them? If not, it’s likely to be a bigger challenge since you’ll have to match the current ones.

Personally, I’d look into branding irons. It looks like that might have been what was used originally. Once you get your rhythm down, it would probably go pretty quickly.


Any knowledge of doing any of these or other ideas?

- Nels

This is LJ. Knowledge is optional. :)

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5491 posts in 2495 days


#6 posted 07-18-2018 03:23 PM

I agree with Rich, this was probably done originally with branding iron numbers. Never have seen this size but my Grandfather had a set about 1 1/2 he used to mark frames and such when building bridges. Where they cam from have no idea. I only asked what they were some 35 years ago and that was his answer.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1256 posts in 249 days


#7 posted 07-18-2018 07:19 PM

how did reducing the thickness come into play ???
I see nothing in the original post about running the boards through a planer.

the way I read it is that the project is planning (anticipating) using that much lumber.
not running 2200 LF of lumber through a thickness planer.

my math isn’t all that keen, but, if there were 500 numbers, that is not a big deal.
set up a jig on the workbench and once the assembly line is put in motion,
the project will go pretty quickly. probably do it all in 2 or 3 days. and since school is out,
there are hundreds of kids looking for some easy pocket change and this would be good
for the community to put a few of them to work and get them off their stupid phones.
jus my Dos Centavos

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

477 posts in 1062 days


#8 posted 07-18-2018 09:39 PM

I would look into steel number stamps it will go a lot faster.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3352 posts in 676 days


#9 posted 07-18-2018 10:09 PM


how did reducing the thickness come into play ???
I see nothing in the original post about running the boards through a planer.

the way I read it is that the project is planning (anticipating) using that much lumber.
not running 2200 LF of lumber through a thickness planer.

- John Smith

LOL John. On LJ, some folks run boards through the planner. Sometimes they use a scrapper on it afterwards.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

800 posts in 1305 days


#10 posted 07-19-2018 12:45 PM

personally i think the key is
The architect wants to keep the “LOOK”.

just wants it to LOOK like it used to.
burn em in

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

282 posts in 2007 days


#11 posted 07-19-2018 01:23 PM

“Keep the look” it looks hand done by a one eyed drunk. Make some branding irons 0-9 (blacksmith), looks like an expensive option over new.

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