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What is the Easiest/Safest Way to Cut a Board for a Box with Bevels

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Forum topic by JohnnyBoy1981 posted 07-17-2018 11:08 PM 956 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnnyBoy1981

235 posts in 635 days


07-17-2018 11:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: miter music box box miter joint question

I feel kind of dumb asking this question because I feel like the answer will be simple, but here it is:

I’m building a music box. It will be 12” x 8” x 2.5”. I want to make the joints mitered (technically beveled I think, but I’m new to this). I’ll reinforce the joints with keys.

I have a 41” board to give myself some extra material to work with.

Is it easier/safer to cut the board into the four pieces with the blade at 90 degrees on my miter saw, then cut the bevels on each board on my TS? I want a 3-side grain wrap around effect.

My TS is a DeWalt jobsite saw with a small table, and my sliding miter saw is a cheap Kobalt 7 1/4” with dubious accuracy.

Thanks all in advance for humoring me!
John


9 replies so far

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therealSteveN

1681 posts in 772 days


#1 posted 07-17-2018 11:55 PM

Everyone works differently so what some think of as easy, some may struggle. First by Mitered/beveled are you thinking of an end product like this?

If so then I would steer clear of the “questionable miter saw” except maybe to cut the stock to rough “OVERSIZED” pieces. I would do all of the rips on the TS, then also use the crosscut. Sounds like your longest piece will be 12” which can easily be handled off the saws miter gauge, but for top accuracy a TS Sled will move the wood through the blade more uniformly, and that always ends in better accuracy. Making a sled is a confidence builder, as well as a skill builder, so before tearing into some possibly expensive wood you may want to use some plywood, and scraps to make a low budget sled.

How are you going to cut your keys? Splines if it’s like the pictured box, would probably be what most would call it.

Are you working off a plan? Picture? Or just a thought in your mind?

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

1681 posts in 772 days


#2 posted 07-18-2018 12:06 AM

I just had a thought. I know several contractors who use those saws on site. All of them also have with it a digital angle cube that tells the exact angler of the saw blade. I’ve heard the miter angles don’t always come back to the same spots, and even when they do you may have a 48 at best when you want a 45.

I looked real quick and of the top 3 I know of the I Gaging was the lowest cost. I have one of each, and I can’t see much difference in output from the I gaging, The Beall tilt box, or my Wixey which I got first because they were the only game in town years ago.

I Gaging

Of all the tools and toys you can add to that job site saw an accurate way to tell angles, if you plan to cut angles, will be your best bang for $$$$ spent.

If you look online you will no doubt find “other” angle cubes. Save your $$$$$ If you look at reviews on a few places for any of them you will see why I say this.

-- Think safe, be safe

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JohnnyBoy1981

235 posts in 635 days


#3 posted 07-18-2018 12:36 AM

Yes, it will be a design like the one pictured. I did buy and setup an Incra V27 miter gauge and a Wixey gauge as well.

I’m working off a plan I got from woodsmithplans.com, but I’m going to make a couple changes here and there.

I only bring up the miter saw because I can divide up the longer board more easily on it (it’s on a stand that has side extensions). I don’t know how to support the longer board on the table saw for the initial cross cuts when so much of it would hang off the side…

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sras

4941 posts in 3327 days


#4 posted 07-18-2018 12:36 AM

If you can practice on a piece of scrap, you’ll get a feel for how well your saw will work.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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JohnnyBoy1981

235 posts in 635 days


#5 posted 07-18-2018 01:53 AM



If you can practice on a piece of scrap, you ll get a feel for how well your saw will work.

- sras

For a relatively simple joint and project like this, would you use a miter saw over a tablesaw? Assuming the miter saw is set up well I guess the only thing you’d need to do is rig up a stop block of some kind.

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Rich

3874 posts in 787 days


#6 posted 07-18-2018 02:24 AM


For a relatively simple joint and project like this, would you use a miter saw over a tablesaw? Assuming the miter saw is set up well I guess the only thing you d need to do is rig up a stop block of some kind.

- JohnnyBoy1981

I’d go for the miter saw, do test cuts to make sure the joints come together square. Stop blocks for sure, since the most critical thing is that the sides are the same length as are the front and back.

Look around for videos on using masking tape for gluing. It’s much easier than messing with clamps on mitered corners.

Also, be sure to account for the bottom of the box before you glue it up. A simple rabbet on each piece is easiest and won’t show through the corners on a mitered box.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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JohnnyBoy1981

235 posts in 635 days


#7 posted 07-18-2018 02:36 AM

Rich,

Regarding your statement:

Also, be sure to account for the bottom of the box before you glue it up. A simple rabbet on each piece is easiest and won’t show through the corners on a mitered box.

Do you mean I should rabbet what will be the lower interior of the box and size a piece of hardwood or plywood to fit for the base? I assume plywood is preferable here since it won’t move seasonally…

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Rich

3874 posts in 787 days


#8 posted 07-18-2018 02:43 AM


Rich,

Regarding your statement:

Also, be sure to account for the bottom of the box before you glue it up. A simple rabbet on each piece is easiest and won’t show through the corners on a mitered box.

Do you mean I should rabbet what will be the lower interior of the box and size a piece of hardwood or plywood to fit for the base? I assume plywood is preferable here since it won t move seasonally…

- JohnnyBoy1981

Exactly. Cut the rabbet to fit the thickness of the plywood base. For the other dimension of the rabbet, figure on roughly half of the thickness of the walls of the box, although it’s not critical. Don’t cut the base to size until the box is glued up. Then you can measure the exact dimensions, cut it and glue it in place.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Woodbum

834 posts in 3263 days


#9 posted 07-18-2018 11:40 AM

table saw, custom built sled, stop blocks, hold downs and a Wixey angle gauge

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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