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Tips for Marquetry Box Lids

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Forum topic by grego posted 07-06-2011 05:54 PM 1695 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


07-06-2011 05:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: box marquetry

I’d appreciate any and all tips for incorporating marquetry in small box lids. In particular, how do you hide and protect the veneer edges?

I see many lovely examples on this site.


10 replies so far

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shipwright

4966 posts in 1452 days


#1 posted 07-07-2011 02:50 AM

This is a pretty simple box http://lumberjocks.com/projects/50187. All I did here was leave a recess in the top frame and drop the top panel in with some hide glue. The panel is 1/4” MDF. Everything was finished first and the excess hide glue was “rubbed” off when it gelled.
Does this answer the question you’re asking?
Or have I missed the point?

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


#2 posted 07-07-2011 04:07 AM

Paul, that’s exactly what I was looking for – thanks!
In fact Arnie’s tea box was one of the examples I was admiring this afternoon!
I guess with MDF you don’t need to go to panels floating in grooves – you can just glue it in to the recess because it ’s so stable – correct?

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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


#3 posted 07-07-2011 04:11 AM

Cr1 – thanks! Actually I’ve already got the used woodwork book bug, and have a pile from Thrift Books. Unfortunately none I have so far (and I have a couple of marquetry books) address this specific question.

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shipwright

4966 posts in 1452 days


#4 posted 07-07-2011 05:20 AM

You can also miter the corners and match the grain if you want to get fancy. These are veneer over MDF as well.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/40941
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/37820

Yes, that’s what I love about MDF. Also it’s absolutely flat.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Mathew Nedeljko's profile

Mathew Nedeljko

601 posts in 2484 days


#5 posted 07-10-2011 01:14 AM

Greg, there are a number of techniques that are practical for incorporating marquetry work into box construction. Yes, floating panels in grooves is one way of doing it, this has the advantage of allowing you to work on a flat piece and easily press the work. You can also do work on both sides in this way.

Another way would be to have a solid piece and press the marquetry directly to the outside of the box. You can glue up the marquetry on a flat substrate first, and then cut out your box parts after your panel is dry.

Hope that helps!

-- Aim high. Ride easy. Trust God. Neale Donald Walsch

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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


#6 posted 07-11-2011 08:20 PM

Thanks Matthew.

It seems to me that an advantage of the floating panel approach is that the edges of the veneer are hidden from view, and also protected from being damaged. Is this valid? Or is the veneer so thin and tightly bonded that these aren’t a concern for your second approach?

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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


#7 posted 07-11-2011 08:21 PM

By the way, I’m having trouble finding 1/4” MDF – is this a rarity?
Plenty of 1/2”, 3/4”, and 1”, but no 1/4”.

Perhaps 1/4” BB plywood would be a reasonable alternative…

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shipwright

4966 posts in 1452 days


#8 posted 07-13-2011 10:32 PM

Hi Greg,

1/4” MDF is easy to find here in BC but my supplier calls it “Rangerboard”. Trade name I guess. I find it at my regular building supply (RONA) and they are not known for their wide range of products.

To answer another of your questions, yes your veneer / substrate joint should be good enough that it is as strong and damage resistant as any other piece.
Glue choice and clamping methods will affect the strength but most popular methods will give a very strong bond. Additionally if you use animal (hide) glue, you can always correct small mistakes after the fact, a feature not available with other glues.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

463 posts in 1183 days


#9 posted 07-14-2011 04:51 AM

Grego, if you are looking to learn more about marquetry and parquetry here is a good site with a lot of information. Hope it helps.

Richard

www.marquetrysociety.ca

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grego

70 posts in 1235 days


#10 posted 07-14-2011 06:09 PM

Richard and Paul – thank you both. Lots of food for thought!

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