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Coat rack hooks and their long screws

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Forum topic by Dchip posted 07-05-2011 05:07 PM 3492 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dchip

270 posts in 2720 days


07-05-2011 05:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Every hook I’ve ever seen for a coat/hat rack comes with screws that are probably 1.5’’. This makes it difficult if you plan to fix these hooks into 3/4 material. I’m probably gonna double up the wood where the hooks are mounted even though this may give a heavier look than I originally wanted. I understand that the length of the screw is probably for reaching through drywall if you were to screw these directly to a stud, but does anyone have any clever solutions for this issue short of cutting every screw or buying new ones? Any input is appreciated.

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com


13 replies so far

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#1 posted 07-08-2011 06:38 AM

Buy new. They’ll cost less than doubling the material (and harpooning your design).

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#2 posted 07-08-2011 06:39 PM

This is a good example of good design vs traditional design. The original pattern was made for attaching to solid wood walls, maybe 200+ years ago. They have been made the same ever since; why? because that’s the way it has always been done. The screw holes are usually spaced 1-1/4” to 1-1/2” apart which means only one screw will line up with a wood stud. The way around it is to mount the hooks on a piece of wood which in turn can be mounted to the wall. I know you know this, but I thought I would explain why it is so. Apparently there is not much interest in re-inventing the wheel, but there are many items of “traditional design” that need to be brought up to date.

View Tomoose's profile

Tomoose

410 posts in 2841 days


#3 posted 07-08-2011 07:39 PM

In similar circumstances I have “pre-tapped” the long screws into the wood to about the desired depth. I then back them out, cut to length, and then re-insert and tighten. Once the hole is mostly formed the screw tip isn’t really needed anymore. Maybe there are some engineer guys who will tell me I shouldn’t do this for a reason I have not considered, but it has worked for me in the past.

Good luck and have fun

Tom

-- “I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.” Pablo Picasso

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

270 posts in 2720 days


#4 posted 07-08-2011 09:27 PM

Thanks for the input all. I’ll probably give a look for some similar looking screws, and if not, dig up the hacksaw.

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#5 posted 07-09-2011 05:35 PM

This is really a no brainer; get shorter screws.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#6 posted 07-10-2011 03:08 AM

Small bolt cutters are WAY faster than hacksawing!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Stuey's profile

Stuey

43 posts in 2425 days


#7 posted 07-10-2011 06:10 AM

I usually swap in 3/4” screws. When using such a hook with shortened screws, I once had the hook pull out since I didn’t hit a stud. A bit of gorilla glue fixed everything.

I wouldn’t bust out the hacksaw, although bolt cutters are a bad idea. They’ll crush the screw a little, possibly deforming it, which could lead to an oversized hole. Oversized hole + short screws can only lead to headaches.

I would just get shorter screws. Besides, you could probably use them for another project down the road anyways, right?

-- http://toolguyd.com

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

270 posts in 2720 days


#8 posted 07-11-2011 02:31 PM

I agree that shorter screws would be the best solution, but matching the color and size will be difficult.

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com

View justahobby's profile

justahobby

19 posts in 2045 days


#9 posted 07-14-2011 03:18 PM

I recently put together several coat hook racks from reclaimed and new hooks. Since all were based on 3/4” stock, I took a scrap and drilled a grid of counter-sunk pilot holes, drove in the screws and put the board upside down in a vise. An angle grinder made short work of 24 screws.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#10 posted 07-14-2011 05:50 PM

What’s the color? Sharpie, fingernail polish, paint…

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View ClayandNancy's profile

ClayandNancy

511 posts in 2483 days


#11 posted 07-14-2011 05:55 PM

It’s a little work but if your attaching hooks to a board that will be mounted on the wall, you could use t-nuts and a machine screw. Of course the screw would have to match or like Lee Barker said.

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

270 posts in 2720 days


#12 posted 07-19-2011 02:23 PM

Thanks everyone. Looks like a good excuse to start checking out some angle grinders…

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com

View Stuey's profile

Stuey

43 posts in 2425 days


#13 posted 07-19-2011 02:30 PM

I may be missing something here, but if you cut/grind the screws down to size, how will they pierce the stud and cut a thread into it? Large pilot hole?

Ordering color-matched screws of the right size will be far cheaper and easier than buying an angle grinder and cutting what you have down to size.

If you’re having too much difficult color-matching, maybe try going for a contrasting look.

-- http://toolguyd.com

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