LumberJocks

Picture Frames

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Tedstor posted 07-03-2011 10:52 PM 994 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1625 posts in 2097 days


07-03-2011 10:52 PM

This christmas, I’m thinking picture frames might make good presents for about 20 friends/family.
Only problem is that I’ve never made one. Can someone rec a good “how to” source? Books are fne. Free online source would be better.
Oh, and feel free to inject your own thoughts, knowledge, ideas, and warnings if you feel inclined.

As always, thanks in advance for making me smarter.


9 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3682 days


#1 posted 07-04-2011 12:13 AM

I’m sure Google will turn up some good how-to articles.

My own advice to you is that picture frames are a lot harder to make than one might think. I suggest you get started and make a couple before deciding you want to fo 20 for Christmas presents. You might have second thoughts.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2753 days


#2 posted 07-04-2011 12:27 AM

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2753 days


#3 posted 07-04-2011 12:32 AM

hers one more plus there are more plans here at americanwoodworker.com,
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/projects/archive/2011/03/07/weekend-picture-frames.aspx

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View BobTheFish's profile

BobTheFish

361 posts in 2016 days


#4 posted 07-04-2011 02:53 AM

Thanks for asking the question. Though it’s not in the near future, I forsaw/forsee usung some really long scraps to do some frames for a few small posters I have. I considered possibly doing something with finger joints or half laps instead of mucking about with perfectly mitered angles. A few contrasting dowels, and BAM! I got myself some decent frames.. Cutting the glass out and sizing a small grove for said glass though has me a bit worried (more in regards to maing sure I get a regular frame glass sized thickness).

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2062 days


#5 posted 07-04-2011 03:06 AM

I use acrylic or plexiglass instead of glass. Can be bought at big box stores, and cut to size on the table saw. Can be tough to get dust free at install because it seems to keep a static charge.

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2753 days


#6 posted 07-04-2011 03:22 AM

yea acrylic is better to use than glass the best is non glare acrylic, I work with this stuff so I have a small suply of it in my shop.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1625 posts in 2097 days


#7 posted 07-04-2011 02:37 PM

Charlie,
I try not to underestimate anything anymore. The easier something is, the easier it is to screw it up (and the dumber you feel for it). I could tell you a shopmade mallet story, but I can’t stand the humiliation. LOL> That said, a couple of prototype frames were definitely in the master plan. Good thing its only July.

I did make the assumption though that once I settle on a single design, I could churn these out pretty quick if I made all the parts at once usings jigs/stops, then set-up a mini production line. But I could definitely be over-simplifying.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1625 posts in 2097 days


#8 posted 07-04-2011 02:47 PM

Ike ,
Thanks for the links. I’m gravitating toward the router table plans since my table saw kinda sucks.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3682 days


#9 posted 07-04-2011 03:31 PM

I second what was said about using acrylic. It’s easy and safe to deal with.

Cutting the rabbet on the back for the glass and artwork is actually the easiest part. A rabbet bit and a router table make short work of it. Depth is not all that critical as long as it is deep enough. If it’s a little deeper than necessary, who cares?

Although it’s not rocket science by any means, figuring dimensions is easy to screw up. For example, if your rabbet is going to be 3/8 wide on each edge, you have to remember that the inside dimensions of your frame need to be about 3/4” smaller than your artwork in length and width. Like I said…. simple, but easy to mess up.

Miters, of course, are tricky to get dead on. Pros use a guillotine-type trimmer to get them perfect. Mine usually end up with wood filler. :-)

The toughest part for me seems to be cutting decorative profiles. No matter how well I try to set up with featherboards, etc., I always seem to end up with some wavy spots where the workpiece has shifted slightly during the cut.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com