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Shelf life of jeweler's rouge

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 07-03-2011 09:12 PM 4143 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


07-03-2011 09:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jewelers rouge shelf life

Does anyone know if jeweler’s rouge has a shelf life or any deterioration after a decade or 2?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


16 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8314 posts in 3115 days


#1 posted 07-03-2011 09:21 PM

I’ve had some around for over a decade and it seems pretty much
the same. It can get dry and crumbly and may not stick to buffing
wheel fibers quite as well, but it seems to cut the same.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2107 days


#2 posted 07-03-2011 09:31 PM

Ditto what Loren said. The mineral(s) are good but the carrier/binder is what dries or degrades.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#3 posted 07-03-2011 09:41 PM

Can you dissolve it in anything to rejuvenate the binder?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2107 days


#4 posted 07-03-2011 09:50 PM

Maybe. If you can identify what it is and find the MSDS to see what the binder is, you may be in business. I bet it varies by mineral used.

I did exactly that with some automotive glass rouge. The lid cracked and it dried up. It got a tiny bit of light mineral oil and mortar/pestle treatment. I put it in a cold cream jar the wife had almost emptied. I still have it and THAT was late ‘90’s.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4458 posts in 3427 days


#5 posted 07-04-2011 12:54 AM

Use it and quit worryin’.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3868 days


#6 posted 07-04-2011 02:28 AM

I go with using it.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View horologist's profile

horologist

102 posts in 3206 days


#7 posted 07-04-2011 03:40 AM

I use mostly green and red rouge, some of which is probably 20 to 30 years old and have observed no ill effects.
Is there some reason for your concern?

-- Troy in Melrose, Florida

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#8 posted 07-04-2011 06:34 AM

It doesn’t want to rub on the leather strop very well and it makes a gob when it does. Seems to have lost its easy flowing consistency. Just like to get it smoothed out like it used to do.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View philip marcou's profile

philip marcou

262 posts in 2064 days


#9 posted 07-04-2011 06:53 AM

It can be dissolved or softened in mineral spirits (turpentine). I think the carrier base is wax so you can also soften it for easier application by heating it a bit.
So if your shop is an oven it will have a short shelf life and simply melt away (;).
Other than that its shelf life is infinite, but I did have a dog who got hold of a bar and chewed it …..

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#10 posted 07-04-2011 08:20 AM

I thought it was probably a binder/carrier issue, not a problem with the polishing materials. If it is wax, I will try heating it a little. The shop has never really been an oven or a freezer. The only difference in the seasons here in Water World, aka Western WA, is about 15 degrees in the mist ;-)

Maybe I will try melting a gob of it with a little mineral oil to soften it up like I do with bees wax to make bullet lube. Thanks for the tip!! ;-))

Seems like the last time I made a strop, about 20 + years ago ;-) it wiped on fairly evenly.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View horologist's profile

horologist

102 posts in 3206 days


#11 posted 07-04-2011 04:19 PM

It does sound like the binder (usually wax or grease) has broken down. You may be able to revive it but in a pinch the stuff is cheap.
:o)

Funny how dogs are attracted to the strangest things. We took care of my mother in law’s dog once, the second day here he dug into the box where I keep my polishing compounds and ate most of the green rouge. Only the green rouge. No ill effects but he made quite a mess.

-- Troy in Melrose, Florida

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1254 posts in 3013 days


#12 posted 07-05-2011 02:19 AM

I have had a stick of it since 1962, when I went into the Army, still works ok.

-- Smitty!!!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#13 posted 07-05-2011 10:52 AM

Yeah, it is cheap, but I hate to throw anything that is basically still good away. Guess that comes form being raised without a penny in my pocket until I was old enough to earn it myself ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 669 days


#14 posted 02-13-2015 01:05 AM

I have the same problem with the white rouge. If I heated it with old motor oil would it hurt the metal or anything?

I know, it’s a dumb question but, I am just curious. What about if I ground it up and dawn in it. I bought a strop from woodcraft that came with a jar of paste; the sales man said all it was was Flexcut gold and some Dawn soap.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#15 posted 02-13-2015 01:28 AM

” If I heated it with old motor oil would it hurt the metal or anything?”

Be careful as motor oil is flammable.

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