LumberJocks

Penofin Question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by enazle posted 07-09-2018 02:33 PM 371 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View enazle's profile

enazle

66 posts in 125 days


07-09-2018 02:33 PM

Anybody know why Penofin does not recommend using a roller to apply their finish?


7 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#1 posted 07-09-2018 02:42 PM

reviewing the “Penofin FAQ” section of their website, I can only guess
that they have had too many complaints of the roller application in inexperienced hands.
if you are experienced with rollers and how to use them, I would do it.
if not – follow their directions to the letter for best, satisfactory results.

Edit: I called the Penofin Customer Service office and the tech rep said
that the reason for not rolling is as I mentioned above. the stain or finish
must be applied then wiped off in the suggested time frame for the product used.
a roller can cover a large area rather quickly, too much for a person to adequately
come back and wipe off the excess in the required time to avoid sticky spots and streaks.
the Tech Rep “strongly suggests” using the felt push pad for large areas as it
does not carry as much liquid as the roller. and the required wipe is easier to control.
the same with brush application. ~ ~ ~ hope that helps you.
Your Project = Your Call (YMMV).

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#2 posted 07-09-2018 03:06 PM

Browsing their FAQ, it seems they are either fairly clueless, or assume their customers are morons that have to be talked down to.

Case 1: Question is whether oily rags must be soaked in water. Their answer is yes. There is no mention of spreading them out to dry.

Case 2: Can I store an opened container? Answer is no. They’ve never heard of Bloxygen I guess. Either that, or they figure they’ll sell more if they can sucker folks into thinking they have to discard that almost-full can from last weekend.

So, even if they said not to use a roller, I’d question it…lol

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View clin's profile

clin

919 posts in 1113 days


#3 posted 07-09-2018 04:57 PM

I’ve used Penofin quite a bit for projects on my house. The only reason I can think of is a roller would seem to me to put way too much on. Penofin is really thin. There’s no texture like you would get with paint. It applies like stain. Put it on, let soak in for a while. Wipe off excess.

There certainly is no harm in trying. Though I see now what John found out and that makes sense.

Penofin soaked rags are a fire hazard. A while back, as a test, I intentionally wadded some together and put them inside my grill. They were burning after a few hours. When possible, I lay them flat to dry. Even then, I’ll put them in a metal pail.. They may stay in there for months until I need the pail. If I need to get rid of them while they are still a bit fresh, though I always let the dry a day or so, I soak them in water, seal up in a trash bag and throw them out. I figure they will stay water soaked long after they’ve made to the land fill.

I’m not sure, but probably after air drying for a day, the potential hazard is gone, but no reason to chance it.

-- Clin

View enazle's profile

enazle

66 posts in 125 days


#4 posted 07-09-2018 06:38 PM

The fire hazard was my thought as well? The roller does use more material, but my questioned why that would be a bad thing? It was 102 degrees this Saturday at my place and I wondered how long it would take for a rag to light up in this heat in direct sunlight. A few days ago, I had soaked some wipe-off rags in soapy water and let them dry-out. I took a dozen or so and wadded them up and threw them in my just emptied dumpster about 10am along with 3 other of the rags that where kinda laid out flat by themselves along the bottom. The lump of rags were smoldering by 2pm. So I guess the wad of rags trapped in the heat as the residual finish activated thus causing ignition? Anyway, I squirted them with water and buried them out back of the shop.

This got me wondering, I’m building a fence and not a deck so I am pre-finishing my boards in the shop. But if it were a deck, could it spontaneously ignite if it was finished in this heat? I’m thinking a 3/8” nap roller might in just a few minutes?

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2250 posts in 1339 days


#5 posted 07-09-2018 06:48 PM

My only guess on the roller ban is dealing with the sloppiness. I’ve tried to use rollers with stuff as thin as Penofin and it tends to fly everywhere unless you roll real slow.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#6 posted 07-09-2018 07:13 PM

Re: the rags. They would have to completely cure while laid out flat before wadding them up. That could take days. Also, discarding them in water is safe. Soaking them in water, taking them out and then letting them sit in a pile will cause a fire. They still have oil in them, and the water prevented it from curing, so they are just as dangerous as when you first used them.

That’s why I dislike the suggestion to put them in water. It gives the wrong impression that that somehow makes them safe. They’re only safe while they stay there. I much prefer to dry them flat for a few days before tossing them.

OK, sorry to turn this into a rag safety thread. I’m done harping on it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View clin's profile

clin

919 posts in 1113 days


#7 posted 07-09-2018 09:51 PM



The fire hazard was my thought as well? The roller does use more material, but my questioned why that would be a bad thing? It was 102 degrees this Saturday at my place and I wondered how long it would take for a rag to light up in this heat in direct sunlight. A few days ago, I had soaked some wipe-off rags in soapy water and let them dry-out. I took a dozen or so and wadded them up and threw them in my just emptied dumpster about 10am along with 3 other of the rags that where kinda laid out flat by themselves along the bottom. The lump of rags were smoldering by 2pm. So I guess the wad of rags trapped in the heat as the residual finish activated thus causing ignition? Anyway, I squirted them with water and buried them out back of the shop.

This got me wondering, I m building a fence and not a deck so I am pre-finishing my boards in the shop. But if it were a deck, could it spontaneously ignite if it was finished in this heat? I m thinking a 3/8” nap roller might in just a few minutes?

- enazle

The fire hazard from oily rags is when they are in a pile or wadded up. It is just as you suspected, it’s the fact that when wadded up, the heat they generate cannot escape and therefore builds up. As the temperature increases, this makes the chemical reaction (curing) happen faster and faster. Essentially thermal runaway occurs and a fire is started. Of course they require oxygen to cure and burn. So a completely oil soaked lump isn’t likely to burn either because oxygen can’t get to the inside. This is why the wad of rags with all the trapped air is dangerous.

When laid out flat, they cannot catch fire because the heat they generate dissipates.

There is no chance a board is going to catch fire. Just like rags laying flat, the heat generated from curing will dissipate and the heat won’t build up. Another aspect of this is the board itself is so relatively massive that it would absorb much of the heat. This again is why rags are a hazard. They are relatively low mass, like kindling. So rather like you can’t start a log on fire with a single match, but you can a piece of paper.

-- Clin

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com