LumberJocks

Inexperienced member looking for advice on time-capsule box.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Hemispheres posted 07-08-2018 09:12 PM 1543 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Hemispheres's profile

Hemispheres

4 posts in 75 days


07-08-2018 09:12 PM

I’m planning to bury some important items in a sealed pvc tube which I will then be placing in a box.

The box will be sealed with caulk, however the part I need assistance with is this:

In th even I add anymore items to the box I want to be able to have the side of the box made in such a way that I can open it via hinges or something similar while still retaining the ability to seal out as much moisture as possible.

Can anyone give me some ideas?


16 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#1 posted 07-08-2018 11:06 PM

my advice is not to put anything in the ground until you get ALL the items assembled.
sealed PVC pipe is a good idea, filled with nitrogen or argon gas if you can.
instead of adding things to a box, just make another PVC tube.
if you need a large box, make a plexiglass box and seal it all up together, again with inert gas.
everyone knows that wood is a very poor choice for in-ground storage.

also – what part of the country are you in ???

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

796 posts in 668 days


#2 posted 07-09-2018 12:01 AM

How about just using a 5gallon jug? Put some silicone on the lid rim and it should seal up just fine.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Hemispheres's profile

Hemispheres

4 posts in 75 days


#3 posted 07-10-2018 02:46 AM

I’m in the tidewater area of Virginia sandwiched between the James and York rivers.

I’ve already cut the wood, planning on treating it a mixture of canola oil, Apple cider vinegar and crushed Tim-Bor crystals before spraying a layer or two of flexseal followed by a couple coats of roofing tar designed for patching/sealing against water.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#4 posted 07-10-2018 12:27 PM

well, it worked for the Viking’s boats – it should work for you.
good luck.
[come back in 120 years and let us know the results].
or six weeks, whichever comes first.
I lived in the Bayview area for 3 years when stationed at NOB.

Edit: why do you want to add a preservative to something that is biodegradable?
canola oil (cooking oil??) and apple cider vinegar are not long-term deterrents.
I am only guessing they will break down when buried in the ground. (as they are organic).
the Timbor is in the right direction.
as for FlexSeal – you been watching way too many infomercials.

from google:
TIMBOR is an insecticide, fungicide and wood preservative for the protection and treatment
of lumber against fungal decay and wood destroying insects (including termites, beetles,
and carpenter ants). Timbor gets its preservative power from the active ingredient
DOT (disodium octaborate tetrahydrate)

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5048 posts in 4078 days


#5 posted 07-10-2018 01:21 PM

Well stated John.

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Hemispheres's profile

Hemispheres

4 posts in 75 days


#6 posted 07-10-2018 02:33 PM

Apple cider vinegar and canola oil is for staining/sealer to keep the insecticide locked in the wood.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2387 posts in 1505 days


#7 posted 07-10-2018 03:51 PM

How long does it have to survive in the ground? I think that Timbor is not intended for in ground use. In continuous contact with the ground, the oil and vinegar will be gone within the first year and the Timbor within 5. Even pressure treated wood will start to rot within 10 years. If you are intent on using the wood box, depending upon how long it has to last of course, it will need to be entombed in a water tight and corrosion proof container of some sort. Even the hinges and clasp may not survive more that few years in the ground.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Steve's profile

Steve

605 posts in 700 days


#8 posted 07-10-2018 03:59 PM

This reminds me of when I was little and wanted to bury my allowance money out in the backyard. I used a tennis ball can and I only made it a few days before I dug it back up(luckily i remembered where) and the money was all wet.

maybe all the coatings might get you a little longer under ground, but the wood will eventually rot.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#9 posted 07-10-2018 04:30 PM

and you started your thread with: ”Inexperienced member looking for advice”.

okay – there is your advice – proceed as you desire.

I feel sorry for anyone that MIGHT find it in 10-20-50-100 years from now
and find absolutely nothing. . . . that would be so disappointing to the finders.
I still feel very confident that the PVC pipe with an inert gas such as argon or nitrogen
in it and sealed with the appropriate PVC glue would be better than anything you have mentioned so far.
I would go a bit further and wrap the capsule loosely in bright orange or yello plastic
(like a poncho from wal-mart) for ease in visibility.

bottom line: Your Project = Your Call.
best of luck in your project.

.

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4988 posts in 3361 days


#10 posted 07-10-2018 07:46 PM


I still feel very confident that the PVC pipe with an inert gas such as argon or nitrogen
in it and sealed with the appropriate PVC glue
- John Smith


I agree with you, but if you want to charge it with an inert gas, you need an inlet and outlet valve, similar to a tire valve in order to evacuate the air and replace it with the gas. What would you use for the fittings? They would probably be susceptible to rust or rot, unlike the PVC.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#11 posted 07-10-2018 07:58 PM

Ron . . . .
the gas is heavier than air, you just crack the lid and put the gas in from a source.
either with a product called Bloxygen or similar inert gas dispenser.
I have a TIG welder that uses 100% argon and when I want to put some in a paint can,
I just turn on the gas and crack the can lid a little and the gas goes in and the oxygen floats out.
no need for a NASA style “purge” as this project is probably doomed from the start.
if we start complicating the matter further with gases, valves, charging and pressurization stuff,
it will never leave the drawing board.
(I’m jus sayin).

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7739 posts in 2125 days


#12 posted 07-10-2018 08:47 PM

These guys were pretty dang sure they had done everything necessary to bury a car for 50 years. If you haven’t seen this, watch the vid… here’s a hint: It DIDNT turn out the way they were confident it would.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=dodge+coronrt+burried+for+50+years&&view=detail&mid=A8C6AE3F1E728AB6191EA8C6AE3F1E728AB6191E&&FORM=VRDGAR

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4988 posts in 3361 days


#13 posted 07-10-2018 08:49 PM

Thanks John for the update about the gas.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1590 posts in 1332 days


#14 posted 07-10-2018 09:47 PM

View Hemispheres's profile

Hemispheres

4 posts in 75 days


#15 posted 08-28-2018 05:52 AM

Well against advice I went the wood route and out of curiousity will check it every other month to see how fast the elements are at it.

48×15” box made from pressure treated pine With outdoor plywood tops. Each piece of wood was first treated with 1-1/2 gallons of water mixed with boric acid and borax mixture over the course of several weeks.

White pine was treated with a stain conditioner before staining, almost lost my project when a propped 500w work light fell over on the plywood glass down and came close to igniting the plywood. A small fire had started inside the light.

I reapplied the sealant to the burnt area and then assembled each piece of pine after a thin flex coat seal. Wasn’t expecting much from it given lack of reviews but this stuff is great.

Put on a thick layer of flexseal on a hot day and it’s rubberized in 2-3 hours.

After the initial thin coat a assembled the pine first then bottom section of plywood, got the bathroom/100% grade caulk and laid a thick bead between all inner and joints. Threw a few more resilient objects into it and put on the other piece of plywood. Each piece got about 2 coats of flexseal.

Last week I purchased a thermoplastic roof sealer and it looks pretty tough. A single layer of this stuff cures about 10 mils thick. The outside forms a thick leathery hide while the innermost parts slowing cure from natural heat cycling. Actually found out the hard way pAinting at night and then hoping it would heat cure.

All together it feels like I’ve got 1/4” of rubberized sealant with 1 1/2 tubes of caulk on top of the wood treatment.

We’ll see how long things last given the homemade borate treatment isn’t poisonous, it just destroys their nutritional capabilities.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com