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General Tools Moisture Meter on sale @ Lowes for $9.98

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Forum topic by jayman7 posted 07-02-2011 12:55 AM 9945 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jayman7

212 posts in 2159 days


07-02-2011 12:55 AM

Topic tags/keywords: moisture meter lowes sale

Found this in my local Lowes today. Not “professional grade” quality moisture meter but a pretty good price if you’re in the market for a moisture meter. Free in-store pickup as well:

Moisture Meter

More reviews found at Amazon


8 replies so far

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1576 days


#1 posted 07-02-2011 01:36 AM

Either it was misspriced or they are closing them out. Good score!

-- Life is good.

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Loren

7551 posts in 2301 days


#2 posted 07-02-2011 01:54 AM

I’m not familiar with such moisture meters sold to the homeowner
market. It’s worth noting that the Lignomat moisture meters
have switches on them that shifts the results according to wood
species “group”.

While you may get a good general idea of whether wood is wet
or dry from an inexpensive moisture meter, it may not be up
to the accuracy standards of a model designed for serious
woodworking.

Wood will achieve equilibrium with your workshop actually, so
it’s a good idea to have a hygrometer in the shop so you have
an idea from day to day what the humidity is. Joints can change
size if left open overnight and for some types of work certain
glue-ups should only be done when moisture is within a specific
range.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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CertifiedWRT

2 posts in 604 days


#3 posted 01-22-2013 06:22 PM

What is an oven test? I have worked for Service Master and Servpro and have never heard of it. I have been certified over a dozen years

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bbasiaga

112 posts in 648 days


#4 posted 01-22-2013 06:41 PM

Oven test. Weigh the wood. Place in the oven. Weigh it again in an hour, and then an hour after that, etc…until the weight doesn’t change anymore. The difference in weight is the amount of mositure lost. You can then back-calculate the starting percentage of moisture.

_Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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CertifiedWRT

2 posts in 604 days


#5 posted 01-22-2013 07:02 PM

Are you serious? LOL. How the heck are you going to weigh a structure, in an oven no less,that has been water damaged? Answer: you are not. This is ludicrous. You are obviously not water certified. There is no way to use this in the real world. Contractors are going to have to face the fact that they have no idea how to handle water damage and step aside while true certified professionals deal with this type of damage. IICRC all the way

View Derakon's profile

Derakon

83 posts in 821 days


#6 posted 01-22-2013 07:08 PM

You don’t stick a water-damaged structure in the oven; this is for testing how much water is in a board you have lying around that you want to use to build something. Cut a small piece off, weigh it, bake it, repeat. Calculate the water content of that small piece and you know how much water is in the entire board.

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BinghamtonEd

1336 posts in 1023 days


#7 posted 01-22-2013 07:14 PM

WRT, it looks like you signed up just to respond to this topic? Do you even know what this topic is about? It isn’t about water damage. It isn’t about putting a structure in your oven. It’s about determining the moisture content of a piece of wood. And when the weight no longer goes down in your oven, it has come into equilibrium with the surrounding environment. Wood needs to be within an acceptable range of moisture content before working with it, depending on the project.

“Are you serious? LOL. How the heck are you going to weigh a structure nobody mentioned a structure, in an oven no less,that has been water damaged nobody mentioned water damage? Answer: you are not. This is ludicrous. You are obviously not water certified nobody mentioned certification. There is no way to use this in the real world when it comes to woodworking, and this is a woodworking forum, there is. Contractors who claimed to be a contractor? are going to have to face the fact that they have no idea how to handle water damage again, water damage? and step aside while true certified professionals deal with this type of damage again, who’s talking about water damage?. IICRC all the way”

The only part of your response that has anything at all to do with this topic is the fact that you used the word “oven”.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3391 posts in 1166 days


#8 posted 04-27-2013 11:49 AM

Amen Bing, As Si would said ya can’t fix stupid.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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