LumberJocks

Making a Pipe Stand... but not sure how

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by hjt posted 07-06-2018 12:58 PM 895 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View hjt's profile

hjt

900 posts in 3260 days


07-06-2018 12:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: pipes pipe stand smoking

I want to build a pipe stand, as I do not care for the design of the one I bought many years ago.

My question is; what tool would you use to create the scooped out area (where the bowl of the pipe sits) of a pipe stand? Alternately, how would you create this part of the project.

I’m not a carver, I have a few hand tools. I have mostly power tools, so I’m hoping this is not going to become a hand carving project.

All of the scoops in the pipe stand in the photo are smooth and seem to be identical to each other.

If by chance there are any pipe smokers here on LJ who have made a stand, please point me to your projects.

Thanks for your help.
Harold

-- Harold


23 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3973 posts in 1889 days


#1 posted 07-06-2018 01:20 PM

I assume something like this is used.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1318 posts in 284 days


#2 posted 07-06-2018 02:23 PM

that is what I was thinking too . . . .
but ~ a 2” router bit in inexperienced hands is a very dangerous thing.
for $29, in not-so-hard wood in a drill press, it might just work.
the workpiece must be clamped firmly to the table and adhere to all safety issues.
providing the 2” diameter divot will be acceptable for the project.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6184 posts in 1260 days


#3 posted 07-06-2018 02:33 PM

If you have a roundover bit, you can also drill or plunge route a flat bottom hole just big enough for the router bit to fit in. Then use the cove bit to finish forming the divot. Of course that would require some kind of guide to be made to use with the router to ensure a true-round divot and consistent size of all the divots.

If you can get a core box bit the right diameter though, that’s definitely the easier solution. Spoon carving tools are always an option too if you want to go the hand tool route.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

260 posts in 3007 days


#4 posted 07-06-2018 02:35 PM

I would consider template routing with a guide bushing and a core box bit.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4579 posts in 834 days


#5 posted 07-06-2018 02:42 PM

https://www.woodline.com/products/1-2-shank-core-box-roundnose-bits?variant=20843861831 :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View hjt's profile

hjt

900 posts in 3260 days


#6 posted 07-07-2018 07:04 PM

Thanks guys. Looks like the consensus is a router bit. Of course, as luck would have it, my router just got fried, but I could use my drill press.

To Bill the Diver…. love your signature line! I counted – still have ten!

-- Harold

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5258 posts in 2326 days


#7 posted 07-08-2018 12:08 AM

Harold,

Billlthedriver is on to it, dont even try to use a router bit your drill press its too slow and more dangerous then the flip table!

There is a dedicated bit for the drill to do this they are made by INSTY.BITS and I think they are called Marble bits.

This should be of interest, tee hee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Swacjz-3O9Y

-- Regards Rob

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5258 posts in 2326 days


#8 posted 07-08-2018 07:51 PM

View hjt's profile

hjt

900 posts in 3260 days


#9 posted 07-10-2018 01:55 AM

Well that takes the fun out of starting my little project, Rob. I thought the drill press would have worked since I”m removing such a small amount of wood. Guess I better send my Bosch to the Router Hospital.

-- Harold

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1318 posts in 284 days


#10 posted 07-10-2018 03:48 PM

Harold – while digging through my tool drawers, I found two router bits
that I bought some time back – I have no idea WHY I bought them.
probably because they were only $5.00 each with free shipping from China LOL.
anyway, I put one in my drill press at medium speed, clamped a piece of Red Oak
firmly to the table, and at a slow depressing force, was able to make a very smooth
round bottom hole in the wood. no splintering or tearout.
I know that 1-1/2” dia is not big enough for your project, but, if you could find a bit
with a much shallower cut, it will work for your project in a drill press. (contrary to the Nay Sayers).
so – in my experimentation, I found it to be a viable option.
of course, a bit with the profile and size that you need may be hard to find,
and if USA Made, it will not be cheap.
how many pipe stands do you want to make ?

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3973 posts in 1889 days


#11 posted 07-10-2018 04:30 PM

John,
That is funny. I bout a set like that from Alibaba for the same reason and come to find out, they are made for CNC machines and won’t fit in router cullet. I think 1-1/2” would be the correct size for a standard pipe.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1318 posts in 284 days


#12 posted 07-10-2018 04:46 PM

wow – I had no idea the CNC and router sizes were different !!
I just checked and luckily, these fit my routers.
something to consider when buying bits from a foreign source.
thanks !!

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View hjt's profile

hjt

900 posts in 3260 days


#13 posted 07-10-2018 10:24 PM

John, thanks for being the “test Lumber Jock.” Glad to know it is indeed possible to run a router bit in a drill press. I know the speed is much slower on a drill press, but I can adjust the belt on the pulleys to speed it up a bit. As for the size I need, I’m not certain. I would think any sized divot in the wood would work just fine, as it only serves as a resting spot for the bowl of the pipe.

I plan to make just one stand for now. I have about 30 pipes in total. I smoke on the back porch – the semi man cave – and generally have 4 -6 pipes in my rotation at a time. So this little pipe stand will serve to hold my 4 – 6 pipes. Depending on how well this turns out, I hope to build a larger cabinet that I could actual have in the house to hold the other 20+ pipes, my “cellar” of tobaccos, and accessories.

-- Harold

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1318 posts in 284 days


#14 posted 07-10-2018 10:41 PM

Harold, if you can wait a couple of weeks, you can get a 2” bit off of E-Bay
for $10.50 with free shipping that should do a couple dozen racks before it gets dull.

and after you practice a bit in the same material you will be making your stands out of,
you can see that you can make one hole – then another 1/4” or so off each end and you
“should” have an elongated divot that would only need some light gouge work and sanding.
and I reiterate again, the workpiece must be clamped ROCK SOLID to prevent bit chattering.
sounds like an interesting project – hope you make a project post with it.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4373 posts in 2431 days


#15 posted 07-11-2018 12:24 AM

Skip to the end of this video and then go back and watch it if it interest you.

https://youtu.be/NQYVYoltvxk

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com