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How to do this curvy molding?

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Forum topic by JohnMcClure posted 07-03-2018 12:12 AM 382 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnMcClure

233 posts in 758 days


07-03-2018 12:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question trim molding bed design

We are about to bring home a daughter. LOML wants a fancy bed for her, so I’m going to make something like this:

My mind is good at solving structural issues, but not good at deciding what visual (non-structural) elements add interest to a design. For that reason, I’m going to go with a decorative trim similar to what’s in this picture.
Question is, how does one make a curved molding like that? (I’m mainly thinking of the “inner rectangle” area on the footboard, which is like a rectangle with a bent-in top; and the curvy stuff on the headboard).
I can route some curved grooves into the footboard…
maybe some pine half-round could be bent and nailed into place?

Thoughts?

Thanks all!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail


6 replies so far

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John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#1 posted 07-03-2018 12:17 AM

it is not bent – the wood is cut that way then routed, carved or run through a shaper.
there was a urethane molding product a few years ago that could be heated and formed
to just about any angle and design. . . . with a quick google search, I found many new materials
are on the market now than back in the ‘80s.
google: “Flexible Molding Images” for urethane moldings that can conform to your shape.
Zago Products is a sample company.
or – cut your own out of wood and add your own personal flair with hand tools.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Knockonit

448 posts in 319 days


#2 posted 07-03-2018 12:27 AM

Yep, what john said, we make a lot of reliefs for joints, laminate, pieces, and run’‘m thru a shaper or hand route, pending on how big and how much.
Rj

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Knockonit

448 posts in 319 days


#3 posted 07-03-2018 12:28 AM

Yep, what john said, we make a lot of reliefs for joints, laminate, pieces, and run’‘m thru a shaper or hand route, pending on how big and how much.
Rj

Also you can make them in panels and laminate them, little bit of work but doable. use the tools you have and work thru it, always a way to overcome a lack of tool,

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EarlS

1523 posts in 2465 days


#4 posted 07-03-2018 12:29 AM

An alternate to making trim is to use paint to create the illusion of shadow lines. I used that trick to make faux wainscoting in our dining room in a previous house. I had plenty of people walk up to it to see how I made such nice arches only to find out it was paint.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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AlaskaGuy

4361 posts in 2426 days


#5 posted 07-03-2018 12:57 AM

https://youtu.be/v0hNKt6kByc

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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JohnMcClure

233 posts in 758 days


#6 posted 07-03-2018 02:09 AM

Thanks, everyone! That was very helpful.
I’m pretty excited to launch this, and I’ve started a blog series to keep track of the design. I welcome your insight there, as there are a lot of choices to make and different processes I’ll be learning to make this:
http://lumberjocks.com/JohnMcClure/blog/124321

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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