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Filled black border - how to?

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Forum topic by bues0022 posted 06-28-2011 10:48 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bues0022

216 posts in 1850 days


06-28-2011 10:48 PM

I’m working on a rocking chair seat. It is laminated layers of spalted maple and Walnut. Some of you may have seen me ask questions on this before, but I have a problem. The top layer of walnut did not glue well with the maple beneath it. When I went to carve out the seat pan, a very ugly glue joint was revealed. To combat this, I have decided to carve out a small portion around the joint, and fill it with a black border – turning a screw-up into a design feature (if you don’t know about the goof up). So, how do I best go about this?

I was first thinking of mixing some black dye (source unknown) with some epoxy and use that to fill the gap. However, the epoxy will be fairly viscous before setting up, and I’m worried it won’t sit well in the spot where I need it. Then I though about mixing the epoxy with some pine sawdust in order to thicken it up, but am worried the pine may not soak up the epoxy/dye mixture and will finish funny. Then, What about mixing the dye with some wood filler? Wood filler (at least the kind I’ve used) seems fairly soft, even when fully cured. I don’t want this to dent/chip easily down the road.

I know I’m not the first to run into a problem like this. Any suggestions for a filler? A picture below is included to show where the filler has to go – the lighter “carved” portion right between the different woods. Due to the irregularity of the carving, I’m not going to attempt a solid fill like a piece of stained birch – it’ll never fit right. I need some kind of putty-like moldable filler – and black. It’s approximately 1/8” tall by 1/8” deep, and an angle between (triangle with the hypotenuse exposed). Thanks for the help.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN


8 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1383 days


#1 posted 06-28-2011 10:50 PM

What about an inlay inserted shallowly into routed out glue-line. That way, you’d have more control of the finished surface by sanding, planing, etc.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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bues0022

216 posts in 1850 days


#2 posted 06-28-2011 11:06 PM

I thought about that, but 1) I don’t know how to do inlay, and 2) because of #1, it would be a pretty significant amount of work for me to do the above.

After I put the above filler in this gap, I will have to come back and sand it flush – just like filling a hole in drywall. I just don’t have a good feel for what will work well to fill the gap with.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1383 days


#3 posted 06-28-2011 11:25 PM

I like BentlyJ’s idea. I know nothing of inlay but I did one once with my Colt and a straightedge. Looked horrible. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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bues0022

216 posts in 1850 days


#4 posted 06-28-2011 11:35 PM

I’ll have to look into that some more, maybe practice to see how good of a joint I can get with tape and/or clay.

As a follow-up question, any ideas on a dye? I was going to use a two-part epoxy with a one-hour set time to give me time to get it all laid out perfectly, but have no idea on dyes.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1187 posts in 1644 days


#5 posted 06-28-2011 11:44 PM

Check out stewmac.com. Look for #1856 inlay filler color for epoxy.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1541 days


#6 posted 06-29-2011 12:19 AM

To get black epoxy, just hold a candle under the bottom of an empty tin can. Lampblack will collect. Let it cool and mix the epoxy right there in it.

Experiment with amounts and stuff, but it works. I use it regularly on knotholes that I want smooth.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1741 days


#7 posted 06-29-2011 01:13 AM

Dan (Maveric777) did a different type of inlay and wrote up a great blog on it. Might want to check that out? Not sure if you are willing to make the area any larger for an inlay?

Even if you don’t want to use it for this project, which I would completely understand, it may be something for you to try in the future?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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bues0022

216 posts in 1850 days


#8 posted 06-29-2011 03:19 PM

Why do some not like casting epoxy? I can’t say I’ve really even heard of it before.

I’m hoping to do something pretty close to what Dan (Maveric777) did in terms of results, but I don’t want to use black wood – that’ll get costly in a hurry! Even still, I’m still thinking some dye mixed with pine sawdust and epoxy might do the trick. I’ll have some time to play tonight, but you’ve all given me some great ideas – as usual. I’ll report back what I ended up doing.

Thanks!

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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