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Vintage Swedish Solliden Chisels any Good?

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Forum topic by rcollege posted 06-25-2018 06:16 PM 263 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rcollege

6 posts in 26 days


06-25-2018 06:16 PM

Hello all, I’m brand new to the LumberJocks.

I thought it’s time to come to the place where people know what they are talking about.

I have wood worked nearly all my life, but only simple things and worked mainly with pine. I have used some hardwoods such as cherry, jarrah, hickory and goncalo alves. I make and design stereo amps using vacuum tubes, I use wooden chasis.

So now you know what I’m using of what I use, I was wondering if some chisels I bought on Ebay would be worth it.
They are stamped “Made in Sweden Solliden”.

Currently, I’m using Harbor Freight chisels, so I wanted some chisels with better steel. I have little $$ so I decided to find some vintage one with “good” steel. I figure most things would be better than what I’m using.

All knowledge and comments are appreciated.

Thank you

Roger


7 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4983 posts in 4016 days


#1 posted 06-25-2018 06:25 PM

I believe it might say Solingen. Good stuff.

-- bill@magraphics.us

View msinc's profile

msinc

448 posts in 559 days


#2 posted 06-25-2018 06:26 PM

They are first rate. If I remember right the “Solliden” refers to the wooden handle style. They probably have a brass ferrule?? Swedish steel is excellent and can be a little tougher than cheaper chisels to sharpen, but once you get it there it will stay for a long time under normal use with many different woods. Good find!!!

Edit: “Solingen” is a German made steel named after the city in Germany where it has been made since medieval times. Also very good stuff for sure, but not Swedish.

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waho6o9

8242 posts in 2633 days


#3 posted 06-25-2018 06:42 PM

They are light weight, well balanced and they hold a sharp edge.

Welcome to Lumber Jocks Roger !

View rcollege's profile

rcollege

6 posts in 26 days


#4 posted 06-25-2018 07:28 PM

Thank you so much for your response.

I feel much better as I heard after I got them that they are not quality chisels.
You guys know better.

Yes, I had to sharpen out a nasty chip on one, and it took forever to sharpen out…still trying to get the back perfectly flat. I now have it sharp enough to shave with…but I may need to flatten the back more.

Thank you again

Roger

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DBDesigns

85 posts in 53 days


#5 posted 06-25-2018 07:52 PM

Roger,
I have been rehabbing chisels and planes for about 10 years now. What I have figured out is that the older chisels generally have good steel no matter what brand. My favorites are generally English steel and even some old American steel. Swedish and German are also good.

As far as flattening the bottom, you are on the right track but there are some shortcuts you need to know about.
1) I flatten chisels with a rough diamond stone. It cuts faster than water stones (you can bevel on a belt sander turned upside down in the vise with a glass of water for quenching the steel.)
2) You don’t have to flatten the entire bottom unless you want to. Usually a depth behind the edge of about 10% of the width will do.
3) A smooth back is just as important as a flat back.

Also, Don’t feel bad about working with pine. As a southern boy, it is one of my favorite woods to work with. It is plentiful, forgiving, and it fills your shop with that magnificent perfume when you cut it. It’s a lot like a good woman, soft, forgiving, and it smells good!

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4983 posts in 4016 days


#6 posted 06-25-2018 09:11 PM

I stand corrected.

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1069 posts in 659 days


#7 posted 06-25-2018 09:30 PM


Edit: “Solingen” is a German made steel named after the city in Germany where it has been made since medieval times. Also very good stuff for sure, but not Swedish.
- msinc

Funny how in the US something is an antique if it’s 100-200 years old vs. a place that has been forging metal since the medieval times. Just think of the master craftsmen and the skills that they have passed down through the millenia.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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