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Forum topic by sepra8 posted 06-23-2018 11:14 PM 677 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sepra8

5 posts in 150 days


06-23-2018 11:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta bandsaw clean-up tune-up maintenance check

Hi all,
Just purchased a 1989 Delta 14” 28-203 BS. I want to tear it down and clean/remove rust/reassemble and tune before using. This is my first band saw, so I’m not sure where to begin, what maintenance checks should be done, and how to get it up to great working order. Does anyone know where I can find a tutorial to walk me through a good set of steps? Nothing would be too basic for me at this point.

Thanks Much!


19 replies so far

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MrUnix

7009 posts in 2376 days


#1 posted 06-24-2018 12:33 AM

They are easy machines to tear down and restore. Get the manual with a parts diagram, which will be your road map. Get new bearings while you are at it. Take lots of pictures (even of stuff you don’t think you will need) then bag and label everything you remove so you know where it goes back.

Once you get it back together – watch the obligatory band saw tune up video here:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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waho6o9

8490 posts in 2754 days


#2 posted 06-24-2018 11:43 AM

Have fun and congrats on your new to you bandsaw.

http://www.mikestools.com/download/Delta-Bandsaw-manuals/28-203.pdf

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sepra8

5 posts in 150 days


#3 posted 06-26-2018 02:28 AM

Thanks for the info!

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Louis Dillard

1 post in 147 days


#4 posted 06-26-2018 10:40 AM

Pretty simple

Clear Debris
Remove Rust, Dirt and Dust
Apply a coat of car wax to the table, remove the blade from the band saw. Clean the blade with rust remover.
Clean the saw

-- https://best-wipes.com/cloth-wipes/

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Bill White

5108 posts in 4138 days


#5 posted 06-26-2018 12:53 PM

Not bein’ snarky, but car wax is not used in my shop on WWing machines. I’ve battled silicone too many times.

-- bill@magraphics.us

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soob

269 posts in 1386 days


#6 posted 06-26-2018 01:04 PM

The most popular parts to replace would be the tension spring, the guide blocks, the tires on the wheels, safety guards if they’re missing, etc. Also the bearings, which are almost certainly very common sizes (I can’t remember which at the moment, but they’re all easy to source and easy to replace). You might also add a longer tension knob if it’s one of those awful short ones that doesn’t extend over the top of the wheel guard.

Oh, and the table insert of course.

The parts for a grizzly g0555 probably fit that saw (they fit most 14” saws, anyway, but I don’t know about that specific one), and Grizzly still stocks them all. So you might consider buying replacement parts from Grizzly if it turns out they fit.

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sepra8

5 posts in 150 days


#7 posted 06-26-2018 01:49 PM

Thanks Soob. I’m new at this so please bear with…

The lower bearing is pressed on a shaft and looks harder to change than the upper. Assume I need to force it off and same to get the new one on. I don’t have any special tools for this if some are neede3d?

thanks

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aravenel

20 posts in 361 days


#8 posted 06-26-2018 02:25 PM

Bandsaws are pretty simple machines—as others have noted, finding a parts diagram would be helpful.

Id also focus on bearings, guides (which may also be bearings), tires, and general cleanup/lubrication. No silicone lube or wax as noted. Then, a good tuneup (search for the Alex Snodgrass video on Youtube), and start cutting.

If you need to pull a bearing off a shaft, I’d first see if you can figure out if the bearing needs to be replaced. If it still turns smoothly, I’d not start with pulling it off the shaft. Harbor Freight sells a cheap bearing puller I believe, just not sure I’d go that far if it seems to be turning well.

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jonah

1878 posts in 3476 days


#9 posted 06-26-2018 03:41 PM

Forget a tension knob. You want a tension crank. They’re cheap (~$20) and good lord are they easier than turning a difficult-to-grip knob.

Avoid car wax. You want paste wax. Spin the wheels and the motor and see if any of the bearings need replacing. Replace the guides with cool blocks. Get a new, sharp, quality blade.

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soob

269 posts in 1386 days


#10 posted 06-26-2018 06:10 PM

If you’re taking the saw apart you might as well replace all the bearings anyway. I can’t remember how you do it, but IIRC you don’t need any special tools. Just a hammer and a vise or something to hold the bearing while you beat on the shaft, and a pipe or socket that fits the inner race for driving new bearings on.

IIRC they’re not pressed in or on very hard and come off easily. But I’m sure that varies from saw to saw.

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Steve

674 posts in 760 days


#11 posted 06-26-2018 06:25 PM

Where is the best place to order new bearings?

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MrUnix

7009 posts in 2376 days


#12 posted 06-26-2018 06:50 PM

Where is the best place to order new bearings?
- Steve

Preferred supplier of the OWWM crowd is Accurate Bearing.
(Read this)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Steve

674 posts in 760 days


#13 posted 06-26-2018 07:03 PM



Where is the best place to order new bearings?
- Steve

Preferred supplier of the OWWM crowd is Accurate Bearing.
(Read this)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Thanks, trying to decide whether to clean up the current ones or just get some new ones.

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DBDesigns

160 posts in 175 days


#14 posted 06-26-2018 07:09 PM

Sepra8,
I own an old Delta. (1937) It has a hex shaft instead of round for the upper blade guide assembly. If you go on line to Carter, www.carterproducts.com , you will find all you need to know about bandsaws and you should learn more than you want to know.

I recommend a riser block to give you more cutting height. Then you will require a 105” blade. Be sure to set the blade so the back of the gullets run across the center of the tires. also, tires are cheap so get yourself a new set, preferably silicone.

You can wax the cast iron pieces with Minwax paste wax but Bill white is right, wax will affect the wood you are sawing and resist finishes so rub it in and let it dry before you do any fine finish work on any wood.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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MrUnix

7009 posts in 2376 days


#15 posted 06-26-2018 07:19 PM

Thanks, trying to decide whether to clean up the current ones or just get some new ones.
- Steve

It’s usually much cheaper and easier to pop in new ones and know they are good – rather than try to peel off the seals (or shields), clean and re-pack. You are looking at less than $20 for the 6 bearings you will need for the saw (two 6202’s, two 6204’s and two 6200’s). Would also be worthwhile to open up the motor and replace the ones in there as well.

Only time I’ll try to clean up existing bearings is when they are either made out of unobtanium or very rare and priced accordingly. 62xx bearings are plentiful and cheap.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Please yank and verify the bearings you have installed before ordering! There is no telling what a PO may have done over the years.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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