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Veritas Shooting Plane Out of Square

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Forum topic by cortes posted 06-21-2018 07:32 PM 1928 views 0 times favorited 50 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cortes

13 posts in 43 days


06-21-2018 07:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veritas plane squareness

I just got a Veritas Shooting plane and a Starrett Master Precision square 20-4 1/2. When I used the square to check the plane, I found it to be out of square. With the precision and quality control of Veritas, I called Lee Valley to see if this was normal. They couldn’t say, but offered to send me a replacement. With the square base resting on the side that slides on the shoot board there is a gap of around 300 microns between the outside edge of the plane side with the blade and the blade of the square. Am I being overly picky in my tolerance for squareness?

I also have a Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane. It’s measured perfectly square.


50 replies so far

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Aj2

1499 posts in 1850 days


#1 posted 06-21-2018 07:41 PM

I think your being too picky.
Also consider the blade squareness to the work combined with how flat your piece sits on the shooting board decides if your on track.
For a square edge to a flat face.

-- Aj

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cortes

13 posts in 43 days


#2 posted 06-21-2018 07:57 PM



I think your being too picky.
Also consider the blade squareness to the work combined with how flat your piece sits on the shooting board decides if your on track.
For a square edge to a flat face.

- Aj2

You’re right about the other factors. I also have the Veritas Shoot Board Track so I’m concerned about the board. The alignment of the blade is the biggest variable. It’s pretty hard to check given it’s skewed. If the replacement plane is also out of square, I may just live with it.

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johnstoneb

2967 posts in 2225 days


#3 posted 06-21-2018 08:12 PM

I don’t think you are being picky. The side should be square to the base especially in a shooting plane.

I would contact veritas directly.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Bill_Steele

361 posts in 1784 days


#4 posted 06-21-2018 08:18 PM

I don’t think you’re being too picky. I think the shooting plane should be square (side to bottom). If the side is not square to the bottom—wouldn’t that same error be translated to the stock being cut? If that’s true—then the resulting joinery would be off as well.

Why should you have to rig something or make adjustments to the shooting board or plane to accommodate the error? What are you gonna do—add layers of painter’s tape to the side to bring it square? Makes no sense to me.

Maybe it’s designed to be this way? I sorta doubt it—but I don’t know. I would wait and see if the replacement is different and if not—I would return it for a refund.

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Kazooman

1064 posts in 2005 days


#5 posted 06-21-2018 08:18 PM

That’s a very fine square, but did you check IT for squareness?

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Rich

3182 posts in 642 days


#6 posted 06-21-2018 09:23 PM


That s a very fine square, but did you check IT for squareness?

- Kazooman

Big +1 on that. Also, I’d measure the result rather than the tool. If you shoot a board, how square is the cut?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Ted78

400 posts in 2052 days


#7 posted 06-21-2018 09:32 PM

I’m ignorant on this one, but I can see both sides. On one hand if I ever paid that much for a plane I think asking for it to be dead on square is reasonable. On the other hand I can’t see it being that much off would ever make any appreciable difference in the squareness of what I planed with it. Also definitely check the square by doing the flip/flop line thing if you haven’t already. All my squares are of much lower quality, but a lot of them aren’t really all that square.

-- Ted

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cortes

13 posts in 43 days


#8 posted 06-21-2018 10:22 PM



That s a very fine square, but did you check IT for squareness?

- Kazooman

Two other of my Veritas planes tested square with the Starrett square. It also tested square with my Woodpecker squares.

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Aj2

1499 posts in 1850 days


#9 posted 06-21-2018 11:23 PM

I was thinking I really don’t know how much 300 microns is. Doesn’t sound like much but your pic looks like 1/32.
My Shooting plane is a LN miter plane and it’s not square.
Somewhere between 1/64 &1/32.According to my starrett No 61
Sorry for calling you picky. ;(

-- Aj

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nutsandbolts

3 posts in 2100 days


#10 posted 06-21-2018 11:56 PM

300 micron is about 12 thousandths. Unacceptable for a shooting plane.

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Kazooman

1064 posts in 2005 days


#11 posted 06-22-2018 12:16 AM


That s a very fine square, but did you check IT for squareness?

- Kazooman

Two other of my Veritas planes tested square with the Starrett square. It also tested square with my Woodpecker squares.

- cortes

Sounds good, but there is a simple, foolproof way to test a square. Take a piece of stock like a 1×6 with one trued edge (fresh from your jointer and checked with a straight edge). Place the square against the trued reference edge and draw ( or perhaps better scribe) a line along the blade. Flip the square over so the handle is facing the opposite way and check the line (scribe mark). Dead on or slightly off? Only dead on will do. Testing one square against another only works if you are 100% certain that the reference is accurate. The simple scribe test does not rely on any assumptions about the accuracy of another tool. My guess is that you are indeed OK, but you can prove that easily.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 700 days


#12 posted 06-22-2018 11:55 AM

Having developed the skill of sawing squarely to a line, I haven’t used a shooting board for quite some time. Besides, 0.011811” ... really?

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

5576 posts in 1191 days


#13 posted 06-22-2018 02:23 PM

In a shooting plane, I wouldn’t accept it. Especially not a Veritas plane at that price point. 300 microns may not sound like a lot but it is once you translate it to each piece in a glue up. Yes, I know there are ways to work around it. But if you drop that kind of cabbage on a plane, you shouldn’t have to.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Aj2

1499 posts in 1850 days


#14 posted 06-22-2018 03:57 PM

Every time he sharpens that skewed blade it going to be a different angle. It’s the blade that determines the cut on the wood not the body of the plane.
Then all the other factors the wood, his ramp,and the human that pushes the whole contraption is a wonder it works at all.
It’s good that Cortes is meticulous about his tools hopefully it will transfer to some nice work to inspire others to challenge themselves.

-- Aj

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splintergroup

2146 posts in 1275 days


#15 posted 06-22-2018 04:06 PM

Veritas prides themselves on quality. They take steps to flatten and square their planes and of course you pay for that when you buy.

Though I believe it won’t adversely affect your work, Lee Valley offering a replacement is par for this company and I’d take them up on their offer.

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