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Some advice with regards to glues?

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Forum topic by BobTheFish posted 06-23-2011 06:25 AM 1135 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BobTheFish

361 posts in 2017 days


06-23-2011 06:25 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question glue

Today I was cleaning up and getting a few old pieces ready to hit the sidewalk pre-garbage pickup. Though mainly MDF and junk “wood” that I’m not upset to toss out, I also was debating one of my first tables, a coffee table of walnut and oak that I made back in high school. With this piece in particular, it wasn’t exactly the greatest piece of craftsmanship, in fact, it was quite simple, however it had been thoroughly beaten and repaired over time, and was hoping to put it out in hopes someone else might see it, snag it, and it might find a new home.

What I noticed about it though was that the glue was quite tacky and gummy in the rather high humidity of today, and then, while picking up another chunk of wood (a piece of scrap where two boards were adhered face to face), I was able to easily separate it where it was joined. (I believe it was only contact cement anyhow)

Now today may be a bit hot and humid in particular, but it did get me to thinking, “What is the best weathering glue for woodworking available?” “what glue is most recommendable without becoming a gooey mess due to moisture, and yet moves with the wood still?” and considering an upcoming project (now on hold), I’m definitely considering a rather large tabletop with a relatively natural finish (or perhaps only oil). What’s going to give me the above and no be overly reactive to the presence of water OR oil?

Mind you, PVA I’ve used often for binding books, and one of my biggest gripes has been how moisture reactive it is… Even the smallest drop can sometimes revert it back to a semi-liquid form. So unless you have a secret concoction regarding that, I’d rule out PVA….

Any hints, tips, or recommendations?


13 replies so far

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2105 days


#1 posted 06-23-2011 06:58 AM

Titebond III is the waterproof formula. TBII and Gorilla are only water resistant.

Contact cement does not react with the wood like the above and never really gets hard hard. I would expect heat and humidity to soften it.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1488 posts in 2818 days


#2 posted 06-23-2011 07:29 AM

I’ve been using TB III lately myself, that or Elmers yellow carpenters glue if it’s indoor only which is PVA. During the summer humidity here is high and I don’t seem to have any issues with it. Humidity right now is 89% (I have a weather station). I jumped on the Gorilla glue bandwagon when it first came out only to find after time it doesn’t live up to the hype. And is more of a PITA to deal with especially getting on your hands.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Joshuah's profile

Joshuah

152 posts in 2158 days


#3 posted 06-23-2011 07:31 AM

I second David, Titebond III is great glue, though I do have a love for Gorilla glue.
Titebond is my vote.

-- -Joshuah

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#4 posted 06-23-2011 09:49 AM

You can’t beat epoxy.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View cloakie1's profile

cloakie1

204 posts in 2020 days


#5 posted 06-23-2011 10:46 AM

i reckon purbond is the way to go for what you are wanting.it comes in a varity of open times and curing times. check it out here

http://www.henkelna.com/SID-0AC83309-462B6754/industrial/industrial-news-6128-henkel-purbond-meets-all-requirements-for-ansi-structural-9794.htm

-- just get stuck in and have a go!!!

View BobTheFish's profile

BobTheFish

361 posts in 2017 days


#6 posted 06-23-2011 12:41 PM

Thanks a lot guys. TB3 has been getting a bit more usage recently from me, though with certain solvents, I have been getting slightly strange reactions. (I may have also done something funky with a piece in particular, re-gluing a joint and then trying to strip around it the next day when the mood to change the finish struck me).

Shipwright, you’re right: NOTHING beats epoxy, but sometimes it’s a bit overkill. :)

And I’ll try a bit of purbond soon. It sounds interesting, and considering I’ll probably be doing some refinishing and repair work for a while till some things are smoothed over and I can start more interesting things…

View oblowme's profile

oblowme

91 posts in 2029 days


#7 posted 06-23-2011 01:25 PM

TB3 is hard to beat, just trying to wash it from your hands says enough. Most epoxies don’t cure out ‘hard’ it may look that way, may feel that way but it is not. The high shock resistance is due to this property. Think of it like the automotive enamal vs. lacquer finsh debate from ‘back in the day’ Enamel was alot more durable, but lacquer looked the best. Lacquer does cure hard and can take a high shine, but is subject to chipping from gravel etc. Enamal never does get trully hard, it can recover from impacts. That trait is the reason it won’t take a buff like lacquer but it will out last it many times over.
Don’t get me wrong, epoxy is a great glue.

-- A TOOL JUNKIE- There, I just admited it to myself...

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2540 days


#8 posted 06-23-2011 10:16 PM

When talking about Gorilla glue please don’t confuse regular Gorilla glue with Gorilla Wood glue. The regular Gorilla glue is a pain to work with because it expands so much. The Gorilla Wood glue behaves like Tite Bond II.

I prefer Tite Bond III primarily because of the long open time (10 minutes). It is also water proof but that is not a big deal for my work.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3050 days


#9 posted 06-23-2011 10:20 PM

I am glad to say since many of us went to school and that was not yesterday LOL , things in the glue world have become very sophisticated.We don’t use glues (unless we chose to) like we used to.These modern glues are quite a different thing and very very good in use, and there becoming better year in and out.. Alistair,

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View BobTheFish's profile

BobTheFish

361 posts in 2017 days


#10 posted 06-23-2011 11:46 PM

Scotsman, Yeah, I noticed. I remember when I last cared much about what types of glue were available, I had either epoxy or the yellow stuff in a tube that behaved like elmer’s. Reading up on some of the stuff lately, I’m starting to realize there’s more types of glue than there are possibly flavors of ice cream.

Scary what can happen in the space of 13 years…

View oblowme's profile

oblowme

91 posts in 2029 days


#11 posted 06-25-2011 02:36 PM

“I am glad to say since many of us went to school and that was not yesterday LOL….”

Ok, I could well be wrong re: modern epoxy, I have little call for it so I don’t keep up with it much. Re: yesterday- Most people don’t have the education market cornered. Nuf said.

Try this: mix up some of your epoxy and spread it on a plastic squeegee. After it cures peal it off and see if it still flexible. If not I’d sure like to know what you are using, seriously.

-- A TOOL JUNKIE- There, I just admited it to myself...

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#12 posted 06-25-2011 06:15 PM

WoodRMe,
I’ve used an awful lot of epoxies of various formulations for various purposes, mostly marine related, and I am a very big fan. They can do things no other glue can.

You seem to be implying that some of the advantages of (most) epoxies, ie: ability to move a little with the material while still hardening enough to sand easily, are disadvantages.

Have I misunderstood you? I’m not just being argumentative. I just don’t get your point, and I’m interested.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View oblowme's profile

oblowme

91 posts in 2029 days


#13 posted 06-26-2011 03:14 PM

No, quite the oppisite in fact, it’s flexable nature is it’s biggest selling point, weather people realize it or not (mostly not) That is why it’s the adhesive of choice with wooden boats etc where the wood will move around alot.
Epoxy glues are a wonderful substance, my point all along is that it does not trully cure ‘hard’ if it did it would not be of much use on such a dynamic material as wood.
The only real bug in the glue pot is that once it cross-links you’re screwed, no saving any of it If you mixed too much to bad for you, that can run into money after awhile.
For all of the hassle involved I’ll ‘stick’ with TB3, which doesn’t cure ‘hard’ either.

-- A TOOL JUNKIE- There, I just admited it to myself...

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