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Forum topic by AndyMSP posted 06-20-2018 01:25 AM 612 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AndyMSP

6 posts in 246 days


06-20-2018 01:25 AM

My buddy Chuck is active duty Navy and is preparing for a move to Oklahoma. He wanted to talk about the challenges he’s facing for moving his shop, so we decided to video it.

https://youtu.be/jZVjgEUv0DQ

-- Andy, Virginia, www.madsissproductions.com


4 replies so far

View ErikF's profile

ErikF

623 posts in 2415 days


#1 posted 06-23-2018 04:05 AM

When I got out of the Marine Corps I had to move my shop from California to Michigan. Luckily, the military paid for the move. Should have seen the look on the movers faces when I showed them the Clausing Colchester 15” gap bed metal lathe.

-- Power to the people.

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LittleShaver

411 posts in 791 days


#2 posted 06-23-2018 02:17 PM

I’ve moved long distance 6 times since I got out of the Navy 39 years ago.
If you pack it yourself, the movers are not responsible for damage to the items inside. Document your tools! It will help to have pictures and receipts if you need to make a claim.
Small tools are easy pickings for a dishonest mover or helper.
I have built at least one crate for each move. Used up leftovers from projects and many are on casters. Most of my moves were to unknown locations, so I needed to be able to have maximum flexibility. Anything that goes into the crates is well wrapped and protected and the crates are screwed shut.
I’ve also transitioned to more French cleat wall cabinets for hand tools. Easy to pack up and screw shut to avoid things going missing and easy to set up at the new location.
If you seal up your tools, don’t forget about moisture control. A good coating of oil or wax can limit rust in transit. Desiccant bags can help. An old machinist trick is chalk in the box. A tub of sidewalk chalk is cheap and easy. Just add a stick or two to each container.
Great idea to pack a small tool kit to have at the new location. There will be things to assemble and repair immediately and having a minor repair kit on hand will save searching. (I learned this the hard way).
OK is OK, but it may not be your forever place. Think about resale as you set up your new shop. Over customizing for a woodshop may not help when it comes time to move again. I still use anti-fatigue mats as I know there is at least one more move to go. I also do not buy 220v tools. I don’t want to have to wait for new electrical outlets or have to re-wire a house to get my shop up and running. Unless you’re a pro production shop, 110v tools will do most anything you want to do.

Good luck on your new adventure.

-- Sawdust Maker

View AndyMSP's profile

AndyMSP

6 posts in 246 days


#3 posted 06-26-2018 01:22 AM



I ve moved long distance 6 times since I got out of the Navy 39 years ago.
If you pack it yourself, the movers are not responsible for damage to the items inside. Document your tools! It will help to have pictures and receipts if you need to make a claim.
Small tools are easy pickings for a dishonest mover or helper.
I have built at least one crate for each move. Used up leftovers from projects and many are on casters. Most of my moves were to unknown locations, so I needed to be able to have maximum flexibility. Anything that goes into the crates is well wrapped and protected and the crates are screwed shut.
I ve also transitioned to more French cleat wall cabinets for hand tools. Easy to pack up and screw shut to avoid things going missing and easy to set up at the new location.
If you seal up your tools, don t forget about moisture control. A good coating of oil or wax can limit rust in transit. Desiccant bags can help. An old machinist trick is chalk in the box. A tub of sidewalk chalk is cheap and easy. Just add a stick or two to each container.
Great idea to pack a small tool kit to have at the new location. There will be things to assemble and repair immediately and having a minor repair kit on hand will save searching. (I learned this the hard way).
OK is OK, but it may not be your forever place. Think about resale as you set up your new shop. Over customizing for a woodshop may not help when it comes time to move again. I still use anti-fatigue mats as I know there is at least one more move to go. I also do not buy 220v tools. I don t want to have to wait for new electrical outlets or have to re-wire a house to get my shop up and running. Unless you re a pro production shop, 110v tools will do most anything you want to do.

Good luck on your new adventure.

- LittleShaver

Thank you Sir. I’ll be sure to pass it along to him

-- Andy, Virginia, www.madsissproductions.com

View AndyMSP's profile

AndyMSP

6 posts in 246 days


#4 posted 06-26-2018 01:23 AM



When I got out of the Marine Corps I had to move my shop from California to Michigan. Luckily, the military paid for the move. Should have seen the look on the movers faces when I showed them the Clausing Colchester 15” gap bed metal lathe.

- ErikF

Semper Fi (from an old Doc)

-- Andy, Virginia, www.madsissproductions.com

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