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Would you buy this used Delta 37-205 jointer?

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Forum topic by weekendwoodguy posted 06-19-2018 03:02 PM 1269 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 169 days


06-19-2018 03:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer question buying used used jointer

I spotted a used Delta 37-205 jointer on CL the other day. Assuming it has been well maintained and is good working order (according to the owner the top is flat, the bearings were changed and the knives were recently sharpened) what do you think a good price is for something like this? The owner is asking $400 which seems to be what most 6” jointers are being listed for on CL in the Chicago area. My instinct is to offer $300.

Here’s a link to the ad: Delta 37-205

My concerns are that it is very old tech and I’m afraid that as a beginner adjustments might frustrate me. Also, the beds look a bit short. However it has a nice solid cast iron top, it sounds like it’s been well maintained and of course it’s cheaper than buying new.

I had also considered just buying a new Grizzly jointer but they have been out of stock for some time now and after contacting them twice over the past couple of months, it doesn’t seem like they’ll be back in stock anytime soon. Rigid jointers are also out of stock on HD website and I’m not sure a Cutech will really be substantial enough as I grow as a woodworker. Sorry for the rambling. Any thoughts?


13 replies so far

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eric4716

50 posts in 591 days


#1 posted 06-19-2018 03:44 PM

I just looked up the listing. As long as the jointer is in good shape, I think with the Art Deco base it would be a good deal.

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Aj2

1665 posts in 1920 days


#2 posted 06-19-2018 04:13 PM

I think you should get it and see for your self. If you find it doesn’t fit your needs it will still have good resale value.
You could always get a machine made in China or Taiwan if that’s makes you happy.

-- Aj

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JayT

5825 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 06-19-2018 04:16 PM

My thought is the base is worth his asking price, with or without the jointer. Those Art Deco bases are hard to find and pricey.

That doesn’t necessarily mean it’s worth the price to you if you are looking for a tool to use, not necessarily vintage. Offer what you are willing to pay and see what happens. Just know that when someone who is into vintage machinery spots that ad, they will probably pay the asking price without question.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 169 days


#4 posted 06-19-2018 04:23 PM

Great info. I had no idea that the base was hard to find.

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Underdog

1171 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 06-19-2018 04:35 PM

I’ve found Delta parts hard to find in general these days. If you know you can get parts for it, then negotiate a fair price and call it a day.
But you might want to think twice about it if vintage doesn’t mean anything to you.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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Woodknack

12341 posts in 2502 days


#6 posted 06-19-2018 06:49 PM

I think you should buy the Cutech and leave the Delta for someone into old Iron. Old machines can be a labor of love.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9451 posts in 2414 days


#7 posted 06-19-2018 07:10 PM

Yup, if you like vintage machines, get it. I’ve got one, and it’s a good little machine. Yes the infeed and outfeed are a little shorter, but it all depends on what you intend to joint on it.

For $400 if it runs, you’re golden. Adjusting it is not particularly difficult. Just look up some videos online. Lots of info on old delta machines around as well.

But like others have said, if vintage machinery isn’t your thing, then pass on it, as it is a vintage machine, and there’s an inherent willingness to tinker that comes with them most times.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 169 days


#8 posted 06-21-2018 01:55 PM

Well I bought it, just in case you were wondering. It appears to be in great condition. The tables are flat, it runs and cuts well. It needs a bit of lubrication here and there but overall I’m very pleased. It’s got a great heft to it and I love the simplicity to the design. I was thinking the tables might be too short but since I’m just starting out I figured this was a great way to get to know what I like/don’t like and then maybe trade up in the future if that day comes. Thanks again for all the advice.

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Aj2

1665 posts in 1920 days


#9 posted 06-21-2018 02:08 PM

Good for you. Not many get a chance to own a jointer of that era. With a art deco base very nice.
To set knives look for Bob Vaughan’s video.

-- Aj

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

308 posts in 1224 days


#10 posted 06-21-2018 02:27 PM

I bought that model a number of years ago, but it did not have the art deco base. Functionally, I think it is a fine machine. Yes, the beds are a bit short, but I have found that most of the time I can cut components to near final length before jointing. I rarely need to joint long pieces.
I would not be too concerned about the need for parts. There is very little to go wrong. There are really only two “consumables”; blades and bearings. You rarely need to replace either and, when you do, they are available. I know you will enjoy it
You can download an instruction sheet from here
Also, the one drawback that this machine has is that it does not have any fine adjustment screws for setting blade height. This makes blade adjustment a bit futzy. So, don’t remove the blades for sharpening unless really necessary. Unless badly dulled or damaged, you can sharpen them in place like this

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

756 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 06-21-2018 03:19 PM

Nice buy. I saw one of those working its butt off on a job site in Denver a few years ago. The carpenter said it was the most reliable tool he’d ever used.

Such a cool jointer!

-- I'd like to see a forklift lift a crate of forks. It'd be so damn literal!

View JayT's profile

JayT

5825 posts in 2333 days


#12 posted 06-21-2018 03:39 PM

Congrats.

There’s very little risk on your part with this purchase. If it works well for your needs, you’ll have a great machine. If you decide you need a larger machine in the future, the art deco base practically ensures you’d be able to sell for at least as much as you spent.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9451 posts in 2414 days


#13 posted 06-21-2018 11:44 PM

Awesome dude, congrats. The good thing about this jointer is that everything is so simple and robust that it’s easy to work on should you need to

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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