LumberJocks

Belt/Disc Sander Motor Question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by GaryCK posted 06-19-2018 03:06 AM 256 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

8 posts in 99 days


06-19-2018 03:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jet beltdisc sander motor question

I found a JET JSG-6DC combination belt/disc sander on Craigslist. It includes a 1.5 HP motor that is wired for 110 VAC power and requires a 30-amp circuit to run. The person selling it doesn’t have a suitable circuit in his house, so I am unable to test the sander. He says that he bought it at auction from his father’s workplace when they were selling off a bunch of equipment and that it worked at the house he moved from two years ago, but would consistently trip the circuit breaker there, which also was not a 30 amp circuit. It would not even begin to turn at his current house without tripping the GFCI circuit breaker he had it plugged into.

I’m interested in it but would rewire it for 220 VAC in my shop. It’s manual includes instructions on how to do that which are very straightforward. The belt and disc both turn freely by hand and feel solid, though I’ve obviously not been able to see it run at speed. My questions are these: If something had gone wrong with the sander, would it likely be anything other than the motor? And if the motor had died on it, how likely am I to find a suitable replacement that would fit?

My suspicion is that the sander actually runs. He’s asking $450 for the unit, which seems reasonable if I could verify how well it works. I suspect I could buy it for less than that and am trying to work out what price at which I’d be willing to take a chance on it. Information on it is available on the JET site here.

Thank you for any thoughts you have.

-- Gary, Wisconsin


7 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2160 posts in 1437 days


#1 posted 06-19-2018 03:53 AM

I am no expert but it surprises me that a 1.5 HP motor requires a 30 amp circuit. Must have one heck of a start up surge. Did he show you the motor’s name plate?

I suppose you might be able to rent or borrow a generator that can handle up to 30 amps, though I don’t have any idea if that is a good idea or not?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6824 posts in 2249 days


#2 posted 06-19-2018 04:05 AM

I’m not sure why they recommend a 30A circuit requirement – the manual states it has an FLA of 12.8A, so a 15 amp circuit should easily handle it, and the plug/outlet shown in the manual is the normal 15A variety. Something sounds goofy there.

As for the price – I wouldn’t pay even half of the asking price for that machine, which appears just to be a grinder with sanding attachments bolted on instead of grinding wheels. They are probably nice machines, but I can’t figure out how they justify the price they are selling those things for.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

8 posts in 99 days


#3 posted 06-19-2018 04:37 AM

Good thought, Nathan. Here’s the motor nameplate. It calls out 22A.

Brad, I see that in the manual as well, but also the requirement for a 30A circuit with 115 VAC power. Inrush current at startup was my thought on why, but I don’t know for sure.

Thank you both.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6824 posts in 2249 days


#4 posted 06-19-2018 04:42 AM

Holy crap… that is one inefficient motor. I’d save my money and keep looking. You can get a brand new Grizzly for what they are asking for that used machine.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

8 posts in 99 days


#5 posted 06-19-2018 12:00 PM

A new Grizzly may be the better option, Brad, but the Grizzly unit I see has a smaller disc 9” vs. 12” (which isn’t a big deal to me) and a much smaller motor, 3/4 HP vs 1-1/2 HP, which is a bigger deal to me, though admittedly most things I would want to sand on a unit like this are smaller and less likely to stall the motor out.

I would still like to figure out what could possibly be wrong with this unit and how likely I am to be able to replace the motor if that were a problem.

Thank you.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2160 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 06-19-2018 12:53 PM

If the larger disc isn’t necessary for you, I would think that the smaller motor would be fine on the Grizzly. I built my own 6×48 belt sander and just use an old 1/2 HP blower motor and it has plenty of power for anything I sand on it.

I wonder if you could get it to work on his existing circuit by removing all of the load from the motor by taking off the disc and the belt sander drive? If not and since he can’t demo it for you but you still want to take a chance, I would only offer him half his asking price at the most and probably less. If you just have to replace the start capacitor, for example, ereplacement parts lists a new one at about $60, though you can probably find a compatible one for less. A new motor, because it is double shafted with a custom housing will probably cost you the price of a brand new Jet machine.

Personally, I would walk away.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6824 posts in 2249 days


#7 posted 06-19-2018 09:23 PM

Just as a reference point, I have a DeWalt 6×48 w/10” disc sander (thanks to a fellow LJ Member!) that uses a pretty standard frame 3/4hp induction motor… so if the motor ever did let out its magic smoke, it would be pretty trivial to replace. It would be much more difficult (and probably much more expensive) to replace the motor on that Jet due to its design should you ever need to. BTW: I’ve done a lot of sanding on mine over the years, and I have never been able to stall it – and I don’t think I could even if I wanted to.

Also, the further out on the disc you sand, the faster it is moving, so you can pretty easily burn your work piece unless you are very careful. With a 12” disc, that would be even more problematic. Most of the sanding on the disc is done towards the middle where it’s not as critical. And for what it’s worth, I do not use the disc nearly as much as I do the belt – but that really depends on the individual and what projects you use the machine for.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com