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Forum topic by Hornnumb2 posted 06-18-2018 03:56 PM 827 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 948 days


06-18-2018 03:56 PM

I need to make a frame for a stained glass panel, it will be made out of 3/4 hardwood by 2in with miter corners. There will be a groove down the center to accept the panel. What is the best way to get a strong joint on my 45’s. The panel is 36×16. Thanks Michael


17 replies so far

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builtinbkyn

2633 posts in 1060 days


#1 posted 06-18-2018 04:00 PM

You probably want to use a half-lap miter:. 3/4” seems a bit lightweight for a panel that size unless it’s going to be supported by an outer frame. Maybe someone here that does stained glass and has done this, can offer some better solutions.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Rich

3547 posts in 709 days


#2 posted 06-18-2018 05:06 PM


You probably want to use a half-lap miter:

- builtinbkyn

+1. Either that or some form of spline, either internal, or a key. The key could be made of a contrasting wood for visual effect.

The bottom line is you need some long grain to long grain surface for gluing. Short of that, you need some type of mechanical fastener.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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EarlS

1525 posts in 2468 days


#3 posted 06-18-2018 05:19 PM

Options for splines are endless and they really can dress up a frame. You could pin a half lap joint and get a Craftsman or G&G look. You could also try variations on a bridle joint or finger joint. I seem to recall seeing a really interesting miter/half lap combination corner. Try doing a google search and then look in the images tab.

You can also use different thickness wood for the top/bottom vs. the sides. Again – the possibilities are endless. Find something that will match up with the style of the stained glass.

You might consider putting a colored backing board behind the glass to bring out the colors in the glass. I have some stained glass panels in the doors of a cabinet that look amazing with light coming through them but since I don’t have a light source behind the glass the awesome colors are missing. I have seen LED strings that are made for use in picture frames if you want to really go all out. Hope this helps.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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woodbutcherbynight

5545 posts in 2529 days


#4 posted 06-18-2018 05:41 PM

Your frame sounds good and any of the joint suggestions would work. Considering the weight of this panel and the desire to not have failed joints I suggest a back. You could paint or stain it so the glass stands out better. Various way to trim around the edge so 1/4 plywood would suffice with some sort of dressing to cover it where it shows. Use screws to attach to the frame from the back. Or dowels if so desired.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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John Smith

1312 posts in 282 days


#5 posted 06-18-2018 10:46 PM

Michael, just out of curiosity, how are you going to display
this glass piece once you get it mounted?
hang it on the wall like a picture frame ?
mounted in a window or door ?
will the glass fit into the flat side or edge side of the frame ?
do you have any photos of your glass piece ?

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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builtinbkyn

2633 posts in 1060 days


#6 posted 06-18-2018 11:04 PM

John you asked all the right questions that some of us should have asked before making any suggestions. I guess “picture frame” made me assume it would be on the flat, but maybe not, as you illustrated. If not, at the very least, that would certainly change the joinery. Now I have to follow this thread and hope we get the OP to respond.


Michael, just out of curiosity, how are you going to display
this glass piece once you get it mounted?
hang it on the wall like a picture frame ?
mounted in a window or door ?
will the glass fit into the flat side or edge side of the frame ?
do you have any photos of your glass piece ?

.

- John Smith

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Andybb

1228 posts in 723 days


#7 posted 06-18-2018 11:06 PM

+1 For splines. Attractive and strong.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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grnjames

14 posts in 115 days


#8 posted 06-25-2018 08:08 AM

That looks sturdy and well.

-- Installation of headache rack for wood panel support I got from http://4wheelonline.com/Truck_Headache_Racks.48833

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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 948 days


#9 posted 06-25-2018 01:48 PM

it will be hung in a window. so splines it is.

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10304 posts in 3152 days


#10 posted 06-27-2018 11:13 PM



+1 For splines. Attractive and strong.

- Andybb

+ 2 For the Splines. Best way to go!

-- It is not necessary for Some People to turn OFF the LIGHT to be IN the DARK!

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theart

46 posts in 674 days


#11 posted 06-28-2018 11:58 AM

I like splined miters. I would also rabbet the back and use glazier’s points to hold the glass in instead of cutting a groove. If the frame is going to be seen from both sides, you can use strips of wood tacked in with brads instead of points. Someday, you might need to get the glass back out of the frame, and with a groove that’s going to be nearly impossible.

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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 07-24-2018 01:11 AM

Here is what I came up with, the frame is 2 1/4×1 1/2. Should I just do one spline or do a wider one?

https://imgur.com/gallery/X3X8VtX

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John Smith

1312 posts in 282 days


#13 posted 07-24-2018 01:18 AM

nice job on the fabrication !!
I really don’t follow you on “how to do a spline”.
unless you mean a spline in the joint ?? I would do two.
if I were doing it, I would create a 1/4 round matching the front
and brad nail it to the back of the glass pane.
or – just a flat piece of wood brad nailed to the back of the pane.
good job

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 948 days


#14 posted 07-24-2018 02:33 AM

I will be doing that for the back but was wondering on the 45 glue joint.

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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 948 days


#15 posted 08-17-2018 04:03 PM

Well the frame is finally done after messing up the cuts on the small pieces and have to get more stock. The frame is walnut and I did the splines out of poplar for contrast but after the danish oil they kinda got lost. I had got some cheap standoffs from home depot for finishing, they left indention were the tip pocked into the frame. I also have a few discolored spots where I guess glue got in the grain. It was my first try from scratch so pretty happy with result.

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