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Removing broken hinge screws

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Forum topic by willie posted 06-11-2018 02:13 AM 532 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willie

534 posts in 2506 days


06-11-2018 02:13 AM

I recently had the “fun” of repairing an antique hall tree for a friend. The hinges that held the seat had been broken several times over the years. The problem I faced was removing several screws that had broken off below the surface. After a lot of thought about how to remove them without damaging anything, I needed a way to remove material around the screw. I came across an old countersink bit with the drill bit removed. I was able to drill around the screw and remove it with needlenose pliers. Since it also left me with a 3/8” hole, I cut some oak plugs and filled the holes. After adding some support for the seat and using the original hinges, in the original places, it was better than new.

I know I’ve seen special bits made for this purpose but if you don’t have one, this will work.

-- Every day above ground is a good day!!!


13 replies so far

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therealSteveN

745 posts in 626 days


#1 posted 06-11-2018 02:36 AM

http://www.instructables.com/id/5-Ways-to-Remove-a-Stripped-Screw/ I saw this some time ago, and have gotten a few “cammed out” screw heads out using that stupid rubber band trick. I have had a few not sunk screws that responded well to chucking them in the drill.

I have a zero batting average using those darn tap it’s, just junk, or I’m not holding my tongue right.

The last tip is my favorite if the head is gone, and there is nothing to work with. Sized appropriately for the screw shaft diameter, you just drill around the screw. The plug cutters if sharpened make a clean hole, then you can use the exact same plug cutter to cut out a face grain plug, which will match the face grain at the point of error. Dowels, and so many of those ready plugs are showing end grain, not a good match for face grain. Plus of all the methods I use less cuss words with these.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Kazooman

1064 posts in 2004 days


#2 posted 06-11-2018 11:57 AM


The last tip is my favorite if the head is gone, and there is nothing to work with. Sized appropriately for the screw shaft diameter, you just drill around the screw. The plug cutters if sharpened make a clean hole, then you can use the exact same plug cutter to cut out a face grain plug, which will match the face grain at the point of error. Dowels, and so many of those ready plugs are showing end grain, not a good match for face grain. Plus of all the methods I use less cuss words with these.

- therealSteveN

I don’t think you mean that you can use the exact same plug cutter to make the original hole and the new plug. The hole is the OD of the cutter and the plug it makes is the ID. You are right about the benefit of being able to make a face grain plug. Much better than using a dowel. You can even make a plug that matches the grain pattern pretty well so it just disappears.

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jmos

843 posts in 2421 days


#3 posted 06-11-2018 12:50 PM

I’ve had pretty good luck with this style extractor: https://tltools.com/

It does less damage to the wood, and gives you the option of using a larger size screw, rather than having to drill out, and dowel; although, that’s still probably the best approach.

-- John

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Rich

3177 posts in 641 days


#4 posted 06-12-2018 12:39 AM

These work well:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodbutcherbynight

5233 posts in 2461 days


#5 posted 06-12-2018 02:21 AM



These work well:

- Rich

I agree and you can get them in metric which allows smaller sizes for a smaller repair area. As for the plug if I am only doing one or two I just make them with a drill and some sandpaper. A mini lathe so to speak but a effective method. If more are needed I use the lathe.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Rick

9912 posts in 3084 days


#6 posted 06-19-2018 07:55 PM


These work well:

- Rich

I like those Rich! Looks like they’d do a Nice Clean Job!

Rick

Here we go again! NO Original Quote Included AGAIN! Yet it shows while I’m doing the Edit! GRRRRR!!

-- Your Assertiveness Training Is Beginning To Interfere With My Anger Management!

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Rick

9912 posts in 3084 days


#7 posted 06-19-2018 08:02 PM

Now they give me a “Reply can’t be blank.” BS! I didn’t Post anything New!

Either ME or My Computer is having a Nervous Breakdown!

-- Your Assertiveness Training Is Beginning To Interfere With My Anger Management!

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RobS888

2450 posts in 1897 days


#8 posted 06-19-2018 08:57 PM



These work well:

- Rich


I take it you have to go all the way through the board to get the plug out?

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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Rich

3177 posts in 641 days


#9 posted 06-19-2018 10:08 PM


I take it you have to go all the way through the board to get the plug out?

- RobS888

No, just pop it out with a screwdriver.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1064 posts in 2004 days


#10 posted 06-19-2018 10:39 PM


I take it you have to go all the way through the board to get the plug out?

- RobS888

No, just pop it out with a screwdriver.

- Rich

That was my immediate thought as well, and I started a response. Then I got to thinking a bit about it. When using a plug cutter you just use a screwdriver to split the wood along the grain and pop the plug out. You want the plug to have nice, round edges. The remaining hole? Who cares? In this case we are more concerned about the hole that is left behind. The “kerf” that the cutters shown in the picture leave is very narrow. I agree that you could use a screwdriver to break out the plug, but I would bet that the edge of the hole you intend to plug gets messed up in the process. It would require a lot of leverage to pop out the core cut by those bits. A traditional plug cutter carves out a wider groove and you could probably pop the plug out without damaging the edges of the hole. I am not so certain with the cutters in the picture.

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Rich

3177 posts in 641 days


#11 posted 06-19-2018 11:05 PM


That was my immediate thought as well, and I started a response. Then I got to thinking a bit about it. When using a plug cutter you just use a screwdriver to split the wood along the grain and pop the plug out. You want the plug to have nice, round edges. The remaining hole? Who cares? In this case we are more concerned about the hole that is left behind. The “kerf” that the cutters shown in the picture leave is very narrow. I agree that you could use a screwdriver to break out the plug, but I would bet that the edge of the hole you intend to plug gets messed up in the process. It would require a lot of leverage to pop out the core cut by those bits. A traditional plug cutter carves out a wider groove and you could probably pop the plug out without damaging the edges of the hole. I am not so certain with the cutters in the picture.

- Kazooman

Under normal circumstances, you’d be right on the money. The thing to keep in mind here is that these are hinge screws and once you plug them up, they will be covered up by the hinge. If you mar the opening a little, no one is going to see it.

Normally, you’d be careful to cut the replacement plug out of the face of a board and align the grain to help obscure the plug, but here, you can even just use a dowel. Unless it’s going to be under a lot of strain, there’s also no need to concern yourself with screwing into end grain — it’ll hold just fine.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodbutcherbynight

5233 posts in 2461 days


#12 posted 06-20-2018 01:58 AM



I am not so certain with the cutters in the picture.

- Kazooman

Pop the plug with a screwdriver. Now you have a hole and lets say the edge is damaged some. Take a drill bit one size maybe two over the hole and drill a perfect hole. Install plug and all done. You removed the screw so nothing in the way of a normal drill bit being used.

Rich is right though, if this goes behind a hinge not really an issue.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Kazooman

1064 posts in 2004 days


#13 posted 06-20-2018 11:50 AM


I take it you have to go all the way through the board to get the plug out?

- RobS888

No, just pop it out with a screwdriver.

- Rich

That was my immediate thought as well, and I started a response. Then I got to thinking a bit about it. When using a plug cutter you just use a screwdriver to split the wood along the grain and pop the plug out. You want the plug to have nice, round edges. The remaining hole? Who cares? In this case we are more concerned about the hole that is left behind. The “kerf” that the cutters shown in the picture leave is very narrow. I agree that you could use a screwdriver to break out the plug, but I would bet that the edge of the hole you intend to plug gets messed up in the process. It would require a lot of leverage to pop out the core cut by those bits. A traditional plug cutter carves out a wider groove and you could probably pop the plug out without damaging the edges of the hole. I am not so certain with the cutters in the picture.

- Kazooman

Whoops, somewhere along the way I forgot these were for hinges.

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