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Forum topic by MakerJake posted 06-06-2018 01:49 PM 846 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MakerJake

7 posts in 196 days


06-06-2018 01:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: ash question

Hello,

I’ve been coming to this site for a long time but just joined today. I am a novice, self taught tinkerer that mostly works with hand tools except for a band saw. I have decided it is time to build a proper bench and settled on the holtzapffel design. I got a great deal on 7/4 Ash so I will build the base and top from that. For the top I will rip the roughly 7-8” wide boards on my band saw into (2) 3.5” boards. Then laminate them to get a 24” top. My first question for this group is: would it make sense to face plane the boards before ripping or should I just plane 1 straight edge, rip the boards, then face plane them individually after ripping?

My thoughts are to rip them first, let them sit for a day or two, then plane them to account for any movement after ripping them. However, it also seems like it would be a lot easier to plane the faces before ripping and then clean them up afterwards. Is there really any big difference in the two approaches?

Thanks for any input and I am looking forward to finally getting a proper bench.


13 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

190 posts in 737 days


#1 posted 06-06-2018 01:54 PM

I personally would rip them and let them acclimate like you described.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

599 posts in 946 days


#2 posted 06-06-2018 01:58 PM



I personally would rip them and let them acclimate like you described.

- RobHannon

+1
It also helps in terms of handling. And if your jointer or planer have a limited capacity (I only have a 6 inch), ripping on the bandsaw first helps you avoid having to flatten them by using either a planer sled, router flattening jig, etc.

Not to mention, if any of the boards have a nasty twist, ripping them in half will mitigate that somewhat, resulting in having to remove less material in order to flatten them.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15706 posts in 2824 days


#3 posted 06-06-2018 03:17 PM

Rip first, then flatten. And I’d not expect too much flattening to happen unless the stuff is rough sawn. Good luck on the build!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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rwe2156

3179 posts in 1687 days


#4 posted 06-06-2018 03:40 PM

Yup, rip ‘em first this is where all the tension in the board is. And the bandsaw is the right tool for this.

I would sticker them for at least a week, then proceed with milling.

If you don’t have a jointer or planer, I suggest finding someone who can help you with this, or else you’re in for a long and strenuous milling session with hand planes.

A table saw is really best for ripping edge parallel, but you can run through a planer edgewise, too.

TIP: When gluing up top, check the faces of the boards & orient the grain direction all the same way. This will make planing the top much less aggravating!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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MakerJake

7 posts in 196 days


#5 posted 06-06-2018 04:32 PM

Awesome, thanks for the help everyone. I will start by ripping them first. I am doing all of the planing by hand so I know that I am in for a lengthy and physical experience.Though I recently purchased a couple of the Lie Nielsen planes and they are such a treat to use, so at least I have that to look forward to. I’m sure I will be back soon with a lot more questions as I progress. Thanks -Jake

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1932 posts in 2100 days


#6 posted 06-06-2018 04:55 PM


I am doing all of the planing by hand so I know that I am in for a lengthy and physical experience.

- MakerJake

You’re not the only one who does this. I ripped the boards for my bench with a table saw, but most everything else was done with hand tools. It’s more of a mental issue than anything else. If you think, I live in a world of electricity, what the hell am I doing? , it will be brutal. If you think, this is simply the only way it’s getting done in my shop, it won’t be.

I use hand tools because I don’t have a lot of room in my garage for a lot of big power tools and a car. Used to park 2 cars in there, kicked one car out. The largest power tool exception is my 17” bandsaw. I refuse to resaw by hand. Never thought I’d do most my work pre-Industrial Revolution but I very quickly began to enjoy the hand tool experience.

Good luck with the build, you’ll be grateful for that bench.

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MakerJake

7 posts in 196 days


#7 posted 06-06-2018 05:12 PM

Thanks Colonel Travis – That sounds just like my setup, 17” bandsaw and a drill press on one side of a garage, the rest are all hand tools. Now it’s time to add the bench so I can use all these planes. I am heading to Maine for a vacation later this month and am planning on stopping by the Lie Nielsen store for a tour and probably pick up some more planes as well.

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ColonelTravis

1932 posts in 2100 days


#8 posted 06-06-2018 05:29 PM

If you have any spare cash, you could probably pick up some planes for me if you feel like it. No pressure.

In April we went on a trip to Canada. I live in Texas, flew to DC for a wedding, rented a car after the wedding, drove to Ontario and Quebec, drove back to DC and flew home. Took two weeks. I mention all that because on the drive back from Quebec I wanted to go to L-N. I’m never in that part of the country. The only day we could have spent in Maine was a Sunday and L-N is closed on Sundays. Really ticked off about that. Did get to a Lee Valley store for the first time, though.

Have a great trip.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3905 posts in 795 days


#9 posted 06-06-2018 07:33 PM

I wouldn’t waste my time planing until the top is completely glued up. Rip them, glue them as flat as you can using cauls, then plane away until it’s flat. Start with your longest plane and work down to your smoother.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View rwe2156's profile (online now)

rwe2156

3179 posts in 1687 days


#10 posted 06-07-2018 01:38 PM

What planes do you have?

I definitely would be looking into a scrub plane. Any old cheap plane will work for this. It will definitely make your odyssey go faster.

I would also look into cambering a plane iron for rough work on a #5 plane.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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MakerJake

7 posts in 196 days


#11 posted 06-07-2018 02:15 PM

I have a scrub plane, a bunch of old Millers Falls smoothing planes, Stanley block, Lie Nielsen # 5 1/2 Jack, and a Lie Nielsen #8 Jointer. Oh and I have a couple of Ibex violin maker planes I’ve used for carving instrument tops.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19018 posts in 2774 days


#12 posted 06-07-2018 11:11 PM

How about some progress pictures as well!!

Take us for the ride!!

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View MakerJake's profile

MakerJake

7 posts in 196 days


#13 posted 06-08-2018 09:20 PM

Hi Don, Will do – I’ll take some pictures along the way and post them under my projects. Thanks for the encouragement!

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