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Drilling the right size hole

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Forum topic by konnon6 posted 06-04-2018 06:32 PM 853 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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konnon6

39 posts in 2434 days


06-04-2018 06:32 PM

I been trying to drill different size holes for clocks but not having such luck. A bar drill has tear out and hole saws don’t go to fractional sizes. Is there some trick I’m missing? Thanks for any help Paul


26 replies so far

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John Smith

1313 posts in 283 days


#1 posted 06-04-2018 06:42 PM

Paul – I am assuming you mean the recessed cavity in the back of the clock face?
a better description of your issues or photos would be of more help.
I have made a few clocks and used a square bottom router bit
and hogged out the recess by hand. if you need different size holes,
you can make a template with different size holes out of 1/4” MDF or plexiglass
and use the top bearing pattern bit. then all your holes will be consistent.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Andybb

1231 posts in 724 days


#2 posted 06-04-2018 06:43 PM

Not really sure what you’re asking. How big are these holes, like the size for a face? For exacting holes I use the Jasper jig.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Loren

10477 posts in 3769 days


#3 posted 06-04-2018 06:48 PM

I’ve used a bar drill (circle cutter) from both
sides to avoid grain blowout. Works ok.

If you’re getting tearout on the entry cut
with the circle cutter it may need sharpening.

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CyberDyneSystems

288 posts in 2309 days


#4 posted 06-04-2018 06:57 PM

Forstner bits.

-- Without the wood, it's just working

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Andybb

1231 posts in 724 days


#5 posted 06-04-2018 07:50 PM



I ve used a bar drill (circle cutter) from both
sides to avoid grain blowout. Works ok.

- Loren


Don’t know why but those things have always scared me.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Loren

10477 posts in 3769 days


#6 posted 06-04-2018 07:58 PM

A lathe chuck is pretty scary if you think
about it.

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John Smith

1313 posts in 283 days


#7 posted 06-04-2018 07:59 PM

Andy – if you want to see something scary,
check out how I use the fly-circle cutter freehand in a 1/2” high torque drill !!!
check my projects page to the Steamer Trunk build, scroll down to the bottom.

and yes, it takes skill and nerves of steel do anything like this freehand.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View konnon6's profile

konnon6

39 posts in 2434 days


#8 posted 06-04-2018 08:41 PM

Thanks so much guys but I tried those, even a fly-circle cutter which I call a bar drill but even then
its not that accurate but I did see a drill bit I liked but I think my have been home made
the cutters get wider as you tighten the nut down and a lock nut keeps it that size.
as for tear out I got a tip to mask off the front before I drill.
this works great! But again size is everything but I might try an inlay ring to cover
my mistakes.

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Andybb

1231 posts in 724 days


#9 posted 06-04-2018 09:01 PM



Andy – if you want to see something scary,
check out how I use the fly-circle cutter freehand in a 1/2” high torque drill !!!
check my projects page to the Steamer Trunk build, scroll down to the bottom.

and yes, it takes skill and nerves of steel do anything like this freehand.

- John Smith

lol. Yeah, it’s just the off-center weight swinging around at high speed on the drill press at about neck/head high that gives me the willies. :-)

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12341 posts in 2501 days


#10 posted 06-05-2018 05:07 AM


Don t know why but those things have always scared me.
- Andybb

First time I used one I wore a face mask and put a piece of plywood between me and the drill. I was sure one of the cutters would fly off and nail me, but they didn’t. Now I think nothing of it.


Thanks so much guys but I tried those, even a fly-circle cutter which I call a bar drill but even then
its not that accurate but I did see a drill bit I liked but I think my have been home made
the cutters get wider as you tighten the nut down and a lock nut keeps it that size.
as for tear out I got a tip to mask off the front before I drill.
this works great! But again size is everything but I might try an inlay ring to cover
my mistakes.

- konnon6

You probably need to sharpen the one you have. It’s like anything with an edge. Maybe turn the speed up and go slow. I have the cheap HF circle cutter, it takes some fiddling to get dead on but I practice in scrap until I have it where I want. Also the cutters are reversible, make sure they are turned the right way and both the same if there are two.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1313 posts in 283 days


#11 posted 06-05-2018 01:13 PM

Rick – you are right. most, if not all, power tools have their inherent dangers.
some skill and a lot practice is required to be safe and efficient in their operation.
but one should NEVER become complacent in safety or bad things can (and DO) happen.
loose clothing and jewelry are often the cause of some very serious injuries with a drill press.
sharp and correctly installed & adjusted cutters can make or break a project. (or fingers).

the circle cutter that I have is over 30 years old. once it is properly sharpened and all tightened up,
I find it almost impossible for it to wander around the cut or provide a different size hole
after a dozen cuts. it takes the standard 1/4×1/4” key stock so it is easily replaceable.
so if one is experiencing different size holes after a few cuts, something is wrong with the drill press
or operator, not the cutter itself. the operator must find that “sweet spot” in the speed and downward
pressure to operate the cutter correctly in the material being cut. I have cut 1/4” aluminum plate
and many hardwoods with my cutter with no issues. if your wood is smoking, something is wrong.
stop and find out what it is before you overheat the cutter or cause damage to the workpiece.
if you are experiencing tearout – something is wrong with the sharpness and adjustment of the cutter
as well as the speed and downward pressure. a finely tuned tool will work well, no matter what it is.
[and after you get your knuckles busted a few times, you learn how to keep your hands out of the way].

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

View theart's profile

theart

46 posts in 675 days


#12 posted 06-05-2018 02:59 PM

How about using the bar drill to make a template, then routing the hole?

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BlazerGator

23 posts in 1310 days


#13 posted 06-05-2018 03:19 PM



How about using the bar drill to make a template, then routing the hole?

- theart

+1 to this … if the cutout is waste, then I’d use a jigsaw to do most of the work and clean it up with a pattern bit.

-- Blaze

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oldnovice

7139 posts in 3489 days


#14 posted 06-05-2018 05:16 PM

I have not heard the term ”bar drill” before, please describe!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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hairy

2752 posts in 3653 days


#15 posted 06-05-2018 06:04 PM

Once you get the right size bit, clamp your workpiece between 2 pieces of plywood, scrap wood or MDF. Backup the entry and the exit and you should eliminate tearout.

-- My reality check bounced...

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