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Forum topic by KnickKnack posted 06-12-2011 06:22 PM 1072 views 1 time favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KnickKnack

988 posts in 2222 days


06-12-2011 06:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: blo oil heated oil

I saw a video a while ago where the guy heated up his linseed oil in a pan within a pan of water on the stove.
I thought this seemed like a good idea – low viscosity etc, but I didn’t like the idea of really hot oil – either making it, or using it, and the kitchen manager, aka wife, didn’t like the idea much either.
So recently I’ve been using this…

It’s just a horizontally cut up water bottle, inside which I put my smaller glass bottle of oil (with the lid slightly open or pressure builds up). I put it in the sun for half an hour and the oil gets toasty, but not very very hot – it’s really quite pleasant to use.
I’m starting from a pretty low skill base, but since I’ve been doing this I’ve been getting a much smoother, silkier finish on my projects.
Just an idea which seems to be working for me, so maybe it’ll work for someone else too.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."


4 replies so far

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1348 days


#1 posted 06-12-2011 06:23 PM

Thanks for this! I hadn’t considered heating my BLO.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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paulbunyan

6 posts in 1227 days


#2 posted 06-12-2011 07:01 PM

whoa! sure beats burning down the house! i like it! and it doesn’t have to be hot hot- just warm. i love the smell of warm linseed oil in the morning.

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KnickKnack

988 posts in 2222 days


#3 posted 06-12-2011 09:16 PM

Interesting article there cr1.
He says he did 2 tests – the dowel and the “real life”, but doesn’t really seem to say what he thought of the “real life” results.
The dowel test is, surely, about capillary action and, given enough time, I’d have thought oil at all temperatures would get to the same(ish) “height”. In real life we’re looking at how much will soak through by gravity in a small-ish amount of time?

I’m not one to argue with conventional wisdom (well, I am, but not here). As I understand it you usually “thin” the first coat to make the fluid less viscous and therefore penetrate more. Heating does the same thing – though how long it stays warm on the new wood can’t be very long.

But, as he says at the end, if it works for you then do it.

I’d be very interested in what other people’s experience with this is.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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KnickKnack

988 posts in 2222 days


#4 posted 06-14-2011 03:54 PM

Re: polymerization

Which is a good thing, right?
But I guess it also means it’s a good idea to only heat up small quantities (preferably only what you’ll be using) at a time?

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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