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is this spalting

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Forum topic by Karda posted 05-29-2018 10:17 PM 947 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1286 posts in 701 days


05-29-2018 10:17 PM

Hi, i am turning a honey dipper and it started turning yellow when turning, this is walnut from the same log as the bowl I asked about earlier that I thought was sanding burn. here is a pic of the yellow streak thanks Mike


18 replies so far

View msinc's profile

msinc

531 posts in 650 days


#1 posted 05-29-2018 10:30 PM

No, it is my understanding that “spalting” is the result of mold, is somewhat slow to occur and thus is done and there when you acquire the wood, that is if you are going to have spalting in the wood in the first place. Spalting does not occur after the fact and it does not happen during or as the result of working wood. I use the term “after the fact” because once a tree is milled and sticker stacked then it is past the point it will spalt as I understand the process. Also, spalted wood, once complete and actually “there” is just this side of rotten or spongy or so-called “punky” wood.
This is why many folks “stabilize” spalted wood when they use it, because there is always the possibility that while there may be spalting for sure it is also very likely that there could be soft wood because it has gone a little too far. Lastly, spalting, at least every time I have seen it, has always been black almost marble like lines in the wood. I incorrectly believed and was told that only certain species of wood would spalt, but that is not true and it appears that almost any wood can do it given the right conditions.
As to the walnut turning yellow…I have never really seen that. I have seen it turn gray if it has set stickered and stacked out in the weather too long and I don’t mean just gray weathered on the outside that goes away when you plane it off. I have a big pile of ten year old walnut boards and they have a band of gray between the heart and sap wood when planed.

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LesB

1818 posts in 3590 days


#2 posted 05-29-2018 11:07 PM

Is that really Walnut? Unless is is sap wood (outer growth on trunk) it should have a little brown coloring. I’m thinking it may be Elm or Ash which can have color like that.

Your refer to the bowl you made earlier but when I went to check your project posting I noticed you have none.
You ask a lot of basic and sometimes interesting questions but it might be nice to see some of your end products.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Desert_Woodworker

1617 posts in 1361 days


#3 posted 05-29-2018 11:30 PM

K – I love the cat in your photo pic.
Yet here on LJ’s when it comes to “wood identification” or problems; we start with the mother wood- ALDER and work backwards- into the various cross breedings, that led us to your “pic”…. Many response are coming, but my first thought is; From the yellow mark, this is a stress mark from the pure Alder being grafted to accept another subspecies…

-- Desert_Woodworker

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GR8HUNTER

4728 posts in 859 days


#4 posted 05-29-2018 11:49 PM

could be popular :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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LeeMills

601 posts in 1448 days


#5 posted 05-29-2018 11:57 PM

If the color is not there before sanding then it probably is not spalting. However, it may be more difficult to see before sanding and yellow is the second most prevalent color per Dr. Spalt.
The dark zone lines are what many turners appreciate most but spalting can be in many colors and shapes.
Here is a pretty in depth discussion by Sara. You can also buy specific fungus / colors from the university.
Per Sara any “wet” wood can spalt, this includes kiln dried which has been re-soaked.
She also has a wonderful book if you are really interested.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctDFsIciRCU

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Karda's profile

Karda

1286 posts in 701 days


#6 posted 05-30-2018 12:03 AM



Is that really Walnut? Unless is is sap wood (outer growth on trunk) it should have a little brown coloring. I m thinking it may be Elm or Ash which can have color like that.

Your refer to the bowl you made earlier but when I went to check your project posting I noticed you have none.
You ask a lot of basic and sometimes interesting questions but it might be nice to see some of your end products.

- LesB

Hi, yes it is walnut, that is sapwood, it does have some darker wood on the other side. The bowl I referred to is in the thread sanding walnut, I was doing a walnut bowl that got yellow when I sanded it. I don’t post anything in finished projects because most of what I do is junk. Thanks about the cat he is a very good landlord. here is pics of a bowl blank from the same tree. I think it bis limb wood because we I stopped the guy said he was saving the trunk for lumber. Thanks for the info on splatting, never knew the whole story on it, just that it happened

View OiBowyer's profile

OiBowyer

16 posts in 139 days


#7 posted 06-04-2018 05:38 AM

Hi guys I’m new here and just figured I would throw in my pennies here to start. A light yellow to greenish streak is common in light colored or”white woods. The color will fade over time and there is no way to prevent that. The tree put extractives in that place to deal with a very minor stress, like air embolism.
Spalting is discoloration from fungi eating the wood. Spalting does not follow the grain or figure of the wood.
That’s the short version. If you would like to know more details just ask.

-- Matt Bielenberg- turning student https://www.etsy.com/shop/Turning4SchoolMoney?ref=search_shop_redirect https://www.facebook.com/Turning-4-School-Money-213112446187330/?modal=admin_todo_tour

View Karda's profile

Karda

1286 posts in 701 days


#8 posted 06-04-2018 06:38 AM

Hi, welcome. I am doing another walnut bowl, this one with a live edge. It also has some yellow in but only along the the bark this time. Thanks for letting me know what it is, I was beginning to think it is something I am doing

View msinc's profile

msinc

531 posts in 650 days


#9 posted 06-04-2018 11:05 AM

This yellowing of walnut is interesting. I have never worked with fresh cut walnut. Every time I luck onto a bunch of black walnut it is stuff that has been drying for at least 10 years or more. I have known several people that had a big walnut tree milled, stacked it up and then lost interest and ended up with the wood.
I also cant seem to get any that the sap wood wasn’t completely removed. I have seen some projects that were done with a little sap wood left in place and I really like the look. Apparently, sap wood on walnut is very objectionable around here….I hope it is an aesthetic thing and not for some structural reason.

View OiBowyer's profile

OiBowyer

16 posts in 139 days


#10 posted 06-04-2018 03:28 PM

Sap wood is generally not as dense as Heartwood of the same species. So the sap wood will have generally less structural capacity. Walnut is pretty dense though so the sap wood should be dense enough to handle most regular use.

-- Matt Bielenberg- turning student https://www.etsy.com/shop/Turning4SchoolMoney?ref=search_shop_redirect https://www.facebook.com/Turning-4-School-Money-213112446187330/?modal=admin_todo_tour

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Andybb

1281 posts in 750 days


#11 posted 06-04-2018 03:49 PM

In answer to your question, that does not look like spalt to me. As someone may have said, spalt is caused by mold/bacteria as the wood decays, and I have never seen it be yellow.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Karda's profile

Karda

1286 posts in 701 days


#12 posted 06-04-2018 06:02 PM

thanks for you replies, looking back at other walnut I have done the sap wood makes some interesting patterns but it also looks dirty. more so after it has bee finished. Here is a pic of a bowl I am working on. I just finished the outside last night.

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msinc

531 posts in 650 days


#13 posted 06-04-2018 10:02 PM

Nice, real nice….I am liking it. The contrast really sets some things off, especially bowls. I just did a picture frame out of black walnut and left some of the sap wood on it. At first I didn’t think I was going to like it, but then when it got the finish on it it popped.

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Karda

1286 posts in 701 days


#14 posted 06-05-2018 03:24 AM

Hi, I got the bowl finished and the first coat of shellac, it is looking better. However there is a spot of tearout I just can’t get out. I agree the contrast between light and dark is striking. thanks

View OiBowyer's profile

OiBowyer

16 posts in 139 days


#15 posted 06-05-2018 02:31 PM

You should wait until the bowl dries fully before you apply a finish. If you put finish on when it’s still green the water as it exits the wood will push the finish it of the pores. This makes your finish much less durable.

Also if your sanding the green wood you won’t be able to get all of the grain tear out polished out because the wood is still relatively soft and the wood is sort of mushy. It may turn out fuzzy after it dries. I wait until it dries to sand at turned projects

-- Matt Bielenberg- turning student https://www.etsy.com/shop/Turning4SchoolMoney?ref=search_shop_redirect https://www.facebook.com/Turning-4-School-Money-213112446187330/?modal=admin_todo_tour

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