LumberJocks

Setting the sanding drum parallel to the bed on Performax 16-32Plus?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Jonathan posted 1164 days ago 2700 views 1 time favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


1164 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: performax 16-32plus drum sander performax 629002 drum parallel to bed

I have an older Performax 16-32Plus drum sander (Model# 629002) and need to realign the sanding drum parallel to the bed. I have been able to find an online copy of the newer Jet 16-32, but the bolts and alignment screw handle they refer to does not exist on my older model.

The only information I’ve been able to find online has said to take 2-blocks of wood of identical height and place them under the drum (with sandpaper removed). After this, lower the drum down close to the blocks, then loosen all 4-bolts that hold up the drum. Now the drum should be resting level on the blocks, or parallel to the bed. Then basically gradually tighten the 4-bolts in alternating fashion, such as when putting a tire back on a car. Sneak up on tightening them… do not tighten them all at once. After they are tight, raise the drum up ever so slightly and slide a feeler gauge between the blocks of wood and the drum. If there is an even amount of pressure in sliding the feeler gauge between the two, the setup is now correct.

Is that the best and most accurate way to accomplish this task on the older 629002 model?

I’d like to get this situation rectified soon, as I have several boards that need to go through the drum sander. I sent a 14” wide end grain cutting board through after the first glue-up and that’s how I discovered that the outer edge of the drum is between 1/32”-1/16” higher than the inner edge of the drum. So, the center of the board is 2” thick, but the outer edges are about 1-15/16” thick, so you can see that when I go to cut the board into strips and turn them on-edge that there will be an unmanageable gap to glue-up.

I thought I’d ask here before I start randomly trying to tackle the problem through experimentation. I bought this drum sander used, so I don’t have a manual for it.

If anyone can answer this question for me, I’d greatly appreciate it. Or, if you have a digital copy that you’d be willing to send me, that would be even better.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."


21 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1317 days


#1 posted 1164 days ago

I can’t be much help, not owning a sander myself. The method you describe seem appropriate, though.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Loren's profile

Loren

7386 posts in 2272 days


#2 posted 1164 days ago

Those sanders will only sand flat in very light cuts.

The outside of the sander will deflect up, and you pretty much
have to accept this and work with it.

Thus obsessing setting the drum perfectly parallel is a waste of time
because your sanding work will never come out with perfectly parallel
faces with a cantilever-drum sander.

This is not such a bad situation as it allows you to sand wider panels
with a barely perceptible crown in the middle.

I set the outside a tiny bit higher. You might set it a bit lower and the
normal deflection will take care of moving your cuts towards parallel,
but may leave a weird line if you are flipping boards around to sand
double-wide and the deflection effect will vary based on feed speed,
wood hardness, width of stock and depth of cut.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#3 posted 1164 days ago

As you describe Loren, that was the problem as I was flipping the board end for end, front and back to try and get everything “even”. Well, it evenly crowned in the middle!

I guess if I don’t flip it end for end and merely flip the board front and back, that should take care of it then, right, more or less equalizing everything?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View stefang's profile

stefang

12860 posts in 1958 days


#4 posted 1164 days ago

Hi Jonathan. Taking into consideration what Loren advises, if you get a very slight crown, it seems that a final hand sanding with fine grain paper and focusing on the center portion should finish the job up near perfect. Just a maybe, but it makes sense to me anyway.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#5 posted 1164 days ago

It seems like it is time to invest in a planer. That would make this go much faster and likely produce the results I’m looking for, prior to the first glue-up. The problem with this board is that it would only fit through a 15-inch planer as it is 14-inches wide. I’d obviously take that into consideration for future boards if using a 13-inch planer. A 15-inch planer is not in the budget and I don’t know that I could find the space for it right now either.

I did think about trying to more or less flatten out the crown with a ROS and some 60-grit, or 80-grit paper.

I’ve already taken more material off of this board than I planned on. I’ve got about 4-board feet of walnut, hard maple, and QS cherry into this board so I thought I’d try to salvage as much as possible.

I just want to make sure that when I do my crosscuts, then flip the pieces to expose the end grain, that the final glue-up isn’t gapping at all along the outside edges, as it would be prone to do in it’s current state. I’ll just have to play around some more and try to fix my problem.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12260 posts in 2721 days


#6 posted 1164 days ago

Handplanes might be an option….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1550 days


#7 posted 1164 days ago

It is odd that it would crown in the middle…
Flipping the material over will compound the problem as it won`t lie flat…

I have had the 22-44 for 20+ years, never had to do much for adjustments on it, but there is slightly less room between drum and table closer to the column that supports the drum – maybe 1/16.

I usually sand on the outside (open end) of the drum, then turn the material end for end for the last few passes, and anything less than 18-20 inches wide will be parallel.

I will look for my book, if I find it will send you the adjustment instructions if they differ.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#8 posted 1164 days ago

I don’t have any handplanes that are worth anything. That would certainly be an option though for this situation. I’ve also thought about the ROS again, but I think it’s going to lead to subpar results. I don’t like to settle for “good enough” and I feel that is the option I’d get trying to fix it with a ROS.

I am seriously contemplating ripping one of the outer pieces of walnut off, as it is 5/4 stock, so that would put me under 13” to send it through a planer. My neighbor and fellow LJ got a new Dewalt 735 a little while back and has offered to let me use it. Although the board is not going to be as wide as I originally intended, it’s also not going to be as long now either, since I’ve removed more material than I originally intended. It’s either going to be slightly shorter, or I will have to decrease the thickness to account for the missing material.

I originally intended to make it about 14”x22” but something more like 12-3/4”x20” would still be adequate. It is a gift, so the final dimensions are not critical, compared to a commissioned piece, for instance.

It just seems like ripping one outer board off, then running it through the planer is going to save me a bit of grief, even though it’ll make the board slightly smaller. I would rather it be slightly smaller and have nice tight, clean joints all the way around, than trying to keep it near the originally intended dimension of 14” and have less than ideal glue-joints.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4783 posts in 2506 days


#9 posted 1164 days ago

I have the newer model with the adjustment handled screw under the motor. I diddled with it when I first set it up and it is well under a 1/16 from left to right. The Wood Shows used to demo this sander by gluing a piece of printed copier paper onto a board, and then sanding off the ink while leaving the paper. This was a long time ago, so it just shows that they are able to be set up. Of course you have to take light passes.

I wish I could help more on adjustments. I guess they found a weakness and fixed it with a simple bolt. I remove the sandpaper, and loosen the four bolts holding the complete yoke that has the thickness knob on top. Then screw in or out the adjustment screw to tilt it, then tighten the four bolts. I used a ruler on edge to check; going back and forth from the left side to the right side. I like a slim metal edge like that more than wood. I have not touched it in three years.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#10 posted 1164 days ago

Quick update:

I decided to at least see if I can get the drum sander to cooperate, not just for this end grain board, but so that future work is also accurate.

If you loosen the 4-nuts on the motor side of the column, the entire drum will loosen, allowing you to wiggle it around (left and right, up and down). Make sure the paper is off the drum.

The more you loosen the top 2-nuts and tighten the bottom 2-nuts, the more the open side of the drum will raise. The problem is, you can’t tighten any of the nuts very much, or else you won’t be able to change the elevation of the drum. I have also looked at possibly loosening the 4-bolts on the inside of the carriage that hold the drum frame onto the carriage and hold the motor onto the other side of the carriage. If I could put a washer as a shim behind the bottom 2-bolt holes where the drum frame meets the carriage frame, that should tilt the outside edge of the drum up a bit, which is what I need. I’m not sure how that’ll affect the bolts properly threading into the motor though? Hmm, the more I think about the design of this thing, the more frustrated I get!

I also loosened all 4-nuts that secure the hold-down rollers. Once they were loose, I was able to ever-so-slightly wedge the outer side of the drum up, then tighten the nuts again. This seemed to help a little bit, but not nearly enough to level things out.

I’m probably going to let it sit for the rest of today as I’m starting to get upset with it, and it’s not worth trying to deal with it any more today, as I’m likely to start getting a bit rough with it.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#11 posted 1164 days ago

I am determined to make this cutting board work, even if it is without the drum sander!

Just spent about an hour using the ROS and a card scraper to try and level everything out.

It’s close, with the outer 2+ inches along the outer edges being about 1/64” shorter than the inner part of the board. I’ll have to continue to work on it, but I’m about done for the day. At least it’s getting better, rather than worse! I think at this point, I’m going to get it as close as I can for now (less than 1/64” difference), then crosscut the pieces that will be turned on-edge to expose the end grain. I’ll then do a dry layout and hand sand each piece until it mates up with the one next to it. I want these glue lines to be as close to perfect as possible!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10708 posts in 1314 days


#12 posted 1164 days ago

Do you have a local cabinet shop with a wide belt sander who could quickly flatten this for you?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#13 posted 1164 days ago

@gfadvm,

I am actually considering that possibility, yes. Lots of cabinet shops around Denver. I just need to find one close that will work with me and not charge me some outrageous amount for a few passes through their drum sander. I literally think 1-2 passes would do it at this point since I’m within 1/64” on each surface.

I think I’ll make a few calls in the morning and see where I can take this board.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#14 posted 1160 days ago

I found another way to adjust for parallel, but this technique only works if you have a newer drum sander than mine, as mine does not have the adjustment knob. It’s on the Joe Woodworker site and seems like a fast, simple, and effective way to do this very accurately:

http://www.joewoodworker.com/performax.htm

If only I had the knob, I wouldn’t have to worry about the 4-head locking bolts!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#15 posted 1016 days ago

So it’s been about 5-months since I’ve used my drum sander. That ends today! I finally took care of the issue mentioned above of the sanding drum not being parallel to the feed table, causing wood to be sanded unevenly when passing through the sander.

A word of caution to anyone looking at buying an older Performax 16-32Plus: Try to find one that has the newer style of adjustability.

I have included a picture of my drum sander below, which is the older model and does not have the adjustment screw. If you can help it, avoid this older model, as it does not have the adjustment screw that Steve refers to above. The new models have this adjustment screw he refers to and that makes it very easy to adjust, so look for the newer model with this ease of adjustment.

Here is a picture of the area I had to manipulate. It is the area that holds the drum onto the frame, and supports the drum motor on the other side. I had to loosen the 4-bolts that hold the motor to the frame. You can only adjust 2-bolts at a time, as the other 2-bolts need to hold the motor in-place. My solution was to insert 1-washer behind each of the 2-bottom bolts, between the drum support and the vertical frame. You can’t really see the 2-added washers, but they’re in the same spot as the business cards for the top 2-bolts. The bottom 2-bolts are hard to get to and I had to loosen and tighten them less than 1/8-turn at a time. Once I got the washers in-place, I tightened all 4-bolts up. Now the outer side of the drum was too high! So, I loosened the 4-bolts again, then used business cards and typing paper as shims on the top 2-bolts, as seen in the picture. I had to play around with various paper thicknesses for the shims until I got it just right. I ended up cutting 1/4-of each business card off and folding it into 3-layers, plus adding 2-layers of typing paper. I have not run any test wood through yet, but it appears at this point that I’ve solved the problem.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase