LumberJocks

Large Walnut Rounds - Need Project Idea...

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Buke posted 05-29-2018 09:18 PM 1708 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Buke's profile

Buke

4 posts in 203 days


05-29-2018 09:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rounds

I’ve lurked around this forum from time to time over the last 4 or 5 years but until now haven’t been in a place to do any wood working so I never bothered to make an account. So, forgive me if this is in the wrong forum.

My parents cut down a big old black walnut tree in their yard a few years back. I don’t remember what happened to the bulk of the wood but my dad kept 5 big rounds from the base of the tree. They’ve been air drying in the barn ever since and remarkably they don’t seem to have checked too bad.

Now I’m looking for ideas on how to use them. They have some character but I have to admit, the wild curves and what not don’t really fit the 1958 mid century aesthetics of my house.

Any ideas about how best to use them? Does anyone have any examples where they’ve used similar pieces?


13 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3544 posts in 3390 days


#1 posted 05-29-2018 09:28 PM

You could build a router slab flattening jig to get them pretty flat, then fill the cracks with epoxy and sand flush. They would make nice end tables or wall decorations.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1887 posts in 2004 days


#2 posted 05-29-2018 10:12 PM

How about a very large end grain cutting board for Fred Flintstone. :)

-- Aj

View Buke's profile

Buke

4 posts in 203 days


#3 posted 05-30-2018 08:59 PM

I hadn’t thought about a giant’s cutting board :)

The end table is the obvious choice, but it just doesn’t go with my houses aesthetic. Maybe I’ll plane one flat and clean it up and see if I get inspired.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2644 posts in 1593 days


#4 posted 05-30-2018 09:08 PM

You could do a rustic/mid-century fusion table by using hairpin legs?

https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/tables/coffee-tables-cocktail-tables/mid-century-slab-coffee-table/id-f_583056/

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

878 posts in 757 days


#5 posted 05-30-2018 10:33 PM

End tables or nights stand. Something a bit different would b a checker or chess board.
Honestly a thin one would make a really awesome clock to hang on the wall.
Also… welcome to LJs

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Buke's profile

Buke

4 posts in 203 days


#6 posted 05-30-2018 11:21 PM

I wonder what would happen if I squared off the edges so that I was left with 5 big end grain blocks, then I laid them all out in a line and then wrapped a wide oak or ash board around the perimeter to create some contrast to the walnut end grain sections. That would create a big dining table with a unique character. It seems like there would be a bunch of potential for differential shrinkage and movement because of the table top being made of lumber in different orientation, but maybe not.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1790 posts in 3065 days


#7 posted 06-01-2018 12:44 PM

Buke, you have just described the steps to create a legendary “Panel of Doom” which will self destruct due to failure to account for and compensate for wood movement differences between the different elements of the structure…

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2644 posts in 1593 days


#8 posted 06-01-2018 02:31 PM

Perhaps if you leave the edge strips off it could be made to work. Instead of edge strips perhaps a profile such as beads. The only situation where I have seen someone join wood oriented like that is in an end grain cutting board which usually involves narrow strips or small blocks. Perhaps if you cut the rounds in such a way that you wind up with grain in a similar orientation along the matching joint edges?

I’ve never done it so I am just throwing out ideas so others can shoot them down.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

190 posts in 737 days


#9 posted 06-01-2018 02:47 PM

Make 5 end/coffee tables and sell them. Then buy more tools.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1887 posts in 2004 days


#10 posted 06-01-2018 04:56 PM

Why don’t you try it a see what happens. Perhaps there’s something to learn.
Be sure to glue the oak border real good and tight.:)

-- Aj

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

878 posts in 757 days


#11 posted 06-01-2018 06:34 PM

Do what Rob said. U could probably get a couple hundred a piece for the end tables

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Buke's profile

Buke

4 posts in 203 days


#12 posted 06-01-2018 07:03 PM

Alright, I think the consensus is in line with my initial thoughts. gluing up multiples of these things is a bad idea.

Did I mention I’m pretty new to woodworking. I took a couple years of wood shop in high school, helped my grandpa with a few projects and then basically did nothing for 20 years.

I like the clock idea. I’m not sure that I can convince my wife that it would fit our aesthetic. Same with the end table.

Thanks for all the input.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5962 posts in 2417 days


#13 posted 06-01-2018 07:08 PM

Find another woodworker and do a wood swap. Trade the walnut for plank lumber that you can use to build things you want. It’d be a shame to cut those into smaller pieces, when there are good uses for them that they naturally lend themselves to without alteration.

Don’t know where you are located, but I’d bet there are more than a few LJ’s on the site would be happy to do some kind of trade. I know I would.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com