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Compound tenon (2 angles)...how would you make this?

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Forum topic by Mcpowell posted 05-29-2018 01:50 PM 3892 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mcpowell

45 posts in 1060 days


05-29-2018 01:50 PM

There are 2 tenons on the above part. One is no problem as it has only one 5º angle. I can make that tenon on my tenon jig for my table saw or with my router on my Leigh tenon jig. However, the other tenon has a 5º angle in two directions. This tenon is my problem child. This tenon is illustrated best on the bottom left view of the attached drawing.

The only way I can think to make the double angled tenon is to use my router. I would make a oval patterned jig that would produce the 2” x .499” tenon. Then I could make a wedge which has a 5º angle in two directions. I could then clamp the work piece to the wedge and both the wedge and the work piece would be clamped vertically under the jig.

I think this would work, but I haven’t tried it yet. Before I take the time to make the jig, I thought I would run it past the fine folks here.

Any suggestions?

-- I want to be good


31 replies so far

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bandit571

21477 posts in 2853 days


#1 posted 05-29-2018 01:57 PM

Bandsaw to cut, chisel to fine tune…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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bonesbr549

1576 posts in 3237 days


#2 posted 05-29-2018 04:42 PM

mark it with an angle gauge and cut it with a good saw or bandsaw.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Loren

10477 posts in 3818 days


#3 posted 05-29-2018 04:52 PM

I’d cut a “birdsmouth” on the table saw in two
cuts with the blade angled 5”.

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Mcpowell

45 posts in 1060 days


#4 posted 05-29-2018 05:18 PM

I hadn’t thought about using my bandsaw. That’s a bit scary to me as the shoulders may not be as precise as I’d like. This would require some practice before I’d be willing to test on a “real” piece.

The illustrated part is the side of the chair, so it will be very visible. I’ve got until the weekend before I need to tackle this portion.

Thanks for the ideas so far.

-- I want to be good

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Loren

10477 posts in 3818 days


#5 posted 05-29-2018 05:46 PM

Cut the shoulders by hand when band sawing.
The band saw does a good job on tenon cheeks
though. Your table may need to tilt both ways
or something like that to do both sides. Again,
a birdsmouth cradle can help by angling the
work piece instead of the table. The advantage
over fussing with an angled wedge is the
birdsmouth has the wedge integrated.

I was thinking of using the birdsmouth on the
Leigh jig to get the twist and using the jig’s
angled table to get the angle. This will make
a nice shoulder as I’m sure you know, but
it’s not that difficult to cut and trim a few
shoulders by hand. If you’re doing a lot of
them figuring out a machine approach makes
sense.

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bandit571

21477 posts in 2853 days


#6 posted 05-29-2018 05:47 PM

Make the shoulder cuts first, then the angled cheek cuts. then cut for the width of the tenon…then the kerf cuts for the wedges..

One step at a time…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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bondogaposis

5039 posts in 2521 days


#7 posted 05-29-2018 08:07 PM

This where hand tools really shine. If you can draw the lines on a board you can cut them.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3818 days


#8 posted 05-29-2018 09:06 PM

You could also rip the stock oversized with a
5 degree angle on one edge. Freehand
the cheek cuts on the band saw and cut the
shoulders by hand. Rip the 5 degree edge
off and then cut the other tenon.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3747 posts in 759 days


#9 posted 05-29-2018 09:14 PM

Why not make a 5º wedge to place between the part and the back plate on your Leigh jig? You will have to eyeball the target alignment (unless you scribe the target on the piece at 5º), but on something that small it’d be easy.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Mcpowell

45 posts in 1060 days


#10 posted 05-29-2018 09:28 PM



Why not make a 5º wedge to place between the part and the back plate on your Leigh jig? You will have to eyeball the target alignment (unless you scribe the target on the piece at 5º), but on something that small it d be easy.

- Rich

Rich,
This is exactly my original plan. I figured I would use one 5º wedge for the “simple” tenon and another wedge, which would have two 5º angles for the compound tenon.

My Leigh jig is not designed for this type of tenon, but I think I can do a bit of adaptive engineering and make it work.

Regards,
Mark

-- I want to be good

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Rich

3747 posts in 759 days


#11 posted 05-29-2018 09:37 PM


My Leigh jig is not designed for this type of tenon, but I think I can do a bit of adaptive engineering and make it work.

Regards,
Mark

- Mcpowell

I think you can too, Mark. There’s nothing unusual about the tenon other than its orientation to the rest of the piece. Of course you’ll have to miter the end so it’s flush to the base plate, but from there, whatever angles the piece is mounted in the jig at should result in a tenon at the correct angles and with shoulders parallel to the top face (end) of the tenon. From what I see in your drawing (an excellent one by the way), that’s what the goal is.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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enazle

66 posts in 178 days


#12 posted 05-29-2018 10:24 PM

1. How many parts and are they paired?

Back in the day when I was a pattern maker for a furniture factory, we had these Zuckerman contour machines to make parts like you have shown. However if they only needed a couple pairs to finish a order, I would mill them out by hand. If these tenons aren’t exposed I would make the part to dimension and drill a couple 1/2 dowel holes then fill the space between with a plug that fit between the two dowels. if the rails aren’t tenoned then the plug is not necessary.

Good luck

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Mcpowell

45 posts in 1060 days


#13 posted 05-29-2018 11:32 PM


I think you can too, Mark. There s nothing unusual about the tenon other than its orientation to the rest of the piece. Of course you ll have to miter the end so it s flush to the base plate, but from there, whatever angles the piece is mounted in the jig at should result in a tenon at the correct angles and with shoulders parallel to the top face (end) of the tenon. From what I see in your drawing (an excellent one by the way), that s what the goal is.

- Rich

Thanks Rich. I have access to a 3D drawing program with work. I know just enough about it to be dangerous.

-- I want to be good

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Mcpowell

45 posts in 1060 days


#14 posted 05-29-2018 11:35 PM



1. How many parts and are they paired?

Back in the day when I was a pattern maker for a furniture factory, we had these Zuckerman contour machines to make parts like you have shown. However if they only needed a couple pairs to finish a order, I would mill them out by hand. If these tenons aren t exposed I would make the part to dimension and drill a couple 1/2 dowel holes then fill the space between with a plug that fit between the two dowels. if the rails aren t tenoned then the plug is not necessary.

Good luck

- enazle

enazle,
I am making 8 chairs; so I have 8 lefts and 8 rights (16 total) to make. It’s more than I want to tackle by hand, but not enough to go buy a true tenon jig. The tenon’s are not exposed once assembled.

-- I want to be good

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1909 posts in 2064 days


#15 posted 05-30-2018 01:55 AM

Oops, at first I didn’t see where you had to make a lot. I had said use hand tools, but that’s a lot of chairs. Since I’m a hand tool guy I have no good suggestion but wish you luck.

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