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Is Danish Oil food safe

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Forum topic by Randy T posted 05-27-2018 11:45 PM 888 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Randy T

21 posts in 123 days


05-27-2018 11:45 PM

Folks:
Is Danish Oil food safe?
I am sure it has probably been asked and discussed before, but when I did a quick search I couldn’t find anything on it. (I probably have to learn how to search properly.)
I have a bowl that I made many, many, moons ago in High School and I am refinishing it and was planning on using Danish Oil.
Thanks for your response.

-- Randy & Corinne, R&C Creations, British Columbia, https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/RccreationsCanada


16 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1309 posts in 280 days


#1 posted 05-27-2018 11:52 PM

google is your friend:
you would have to google the particular brand you want to use prior to use.

“Bestwood” Danish Oil is naturally water, food and alcohol resistant.
It is safe for food contact when dry and can be used for wooden bowls,
chopping boards and butchers blocks. It is certified EN71 toy safe.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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LesB

1801 posts in 3560 days


#2 posted 05-28-2018 12:34 AM

Most “Danish” oils are made from a base of Linseed oil or possibly Tung oil which are both food safe after they have cured (they don’t dry they cure when exposed to oxygen) to make them cure faster “dryers” are often added and most dryers contain heavy metals. Even then they are considered food safe. If you want to be close to 100% sure use pure linseed or tung oil.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Randy T

21 posts in 123 days


#3 posted 05-28-2018 12:40 AM

Thanks guys. I thought it was, but when I googled it, I got a couple of conflicting answers.
I thought it was better to come here. I trust the responses that I see here.
Thanks again.

-- Randy & Corinne, R&C Creations, British Columbia, https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/RccreationsCanada

View Rich's profile

Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#4 posted 05-28-2018 02:07 AM

If it’s going to be used as a serving bowl, or maybe a salad bowl, I’d use a hard finish like a urethane. You can oil it first if you want that look, but a hard film will be better for the topcoat. You also don’t want to do anything in it that scrapes the surface. Even though ingesting slivers of urethane won’t hurt you, it’s not very appetizing, and the bowl will wind up looking like crap.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View recon49's profile

recon49

7 posts in 122 days


#5 posted 05-29-2018 05:45 AM

Good info. Learned something new today.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2407 posts in 2252 days


#6 posted 05-29-2018 09:18 AM

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

361 posts in 736 days


#7 posted 05-29-2018 01:07 PM

I use Mineral oil on anything that contacts food. Sometimes mixed with bees wax.

-- Sawdust Maker

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Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#8 posted 05-29-2018 01:21 PM

Put it this way, General Finishes Salad Bowl Finish is an oil based urethane that dries hard and I have yet to hear any concerns from consumer safety advocates about dangers of putting food on the surface. They also say it’s not to be used on surfaces that are used for chopping.

Obviously we’re not talking about storing food in wooden containers long term. But when it comes to putting cheese and charcuterie out for your party, a hard finish like urethane, lacquer or shellac is not going to taint your food if the finish has fully cured.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Wildwood

2407 posts in 2252 days


#9 posted 05-29-2018 04:17 PM

One thing not provided by finish manufactures is fully cure times for their finishes! Make common sense why they do not. Not knocking manufacturers for not providing that information almost impossible given number of coats, where, temp & humidity variables. Another fact not provided is out gassing from their products.

Quote from Jonathan Binzen’s article:

After scores of conversations with chemists, regulatory agencies, finish manufacturers, finishing experts, and woodworkers, I found that there are a few finishes that everyone agrees are food safe. However, these finishes tend to be the least protective, and the great majority are in a kind of limbo, with many experts saying most are fine for use with food but with others saying they should be avoided because there are some lingering questions about their safety. In the welter of contrary opinions about which finishes are food safe and which are not, a few naturally derived, unblended, no-hidden-ingredients, certainly nontoxic finishes stand out.

Lot of woodworkers on various message boards would direct you to CFR’s that address chemicals and safe for food contact. Even with the aide of a product MSDS or SDS good luck finding those chemicals on any CFR!

For a food safe coating use non-drying mineral oil, and provide small bottle to my customers for re-coating as required. I use mineral oil laxative, and never Baby Oil or machine mineral oils which not food safe!

Actual experience with poly coated salt & pepper shakers, inside no finish applied. Brought into the house to dry faster did not look very good after washed with hot soapy water!

So make sure folks know how to clean those wood products whatever finish you choose!

-- Bill

View LesB's profile

LesB

1801 posts in 3560 days


#10 posted 05-29-2018 11:39 PM

Randy did not say what he was going to use his finish on but his only project post was a cutting board so I did not mention using a hard finish because they don’t work well on cutting boards.

But General and Behlen’s salad bowl finish works great for hard finishes and after it has cured for at least 72 hours is is food safe and very durable. Application can be done with a cotton cloth or a high quality paper towel. My wife recently had me refinish a bowl I made 15 years ago that she must use at least once a week for salads. The bowl was finished with one of these salad bowl finishes (I use both so I don’t know which one) and was looking a little worn and dull. A quick sanding and three more coats of the finish and it was ready for another 15 years. And by then I probably won’t be around so someone else will have to take care of it.

I’m not a fan of mineral oil because it does not dry or more correctly cure, which is what linseed and tung oil do. So a recently finished mineral oil item can actually leave some oil on a nice table cloth or similar surface.
Instead of those I have found I like processed Walnut oil. It soaks in well and cures in the wood to form a water resistant finish that can be replenished when needed just like mineral oil. I usually apply 3 to 5 coats for the first finish.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Wildwood

2407 posts in 2252 days


#11 posted 06-02-2018 06:53 PM

Majority of bowls I turn get a film finish because only food they come in contact with is candy in a wrapper. Most bowls end up as center pieces with artfical flowers.

Yes laxative MO, is not drying petroleum product and needs reapplications over time with use. People that requested mixing & serving bowl sets provided a bottle of MO with their order.

On rolling pins, scoops, and spoons don’t use any finish at all!

Going to section 3. Composition/information on ingredients, not a chemist but know would not use these products!

http://www.behlen.co.uk/safety/B603-00014.pdf

https://generalfinishes.com/sites/default/files/documents/files/2017-04/sds-salad-bowl-finish-general-finishes-ghs-us-hcs-2012-v4.3.2-2014.pdf

Manufacturers don’t always list all hazardous chemicals used in their products in section 3. and get away with it legally!

Read ingredient labels or check out section 3. on products MSDS or SDS before deciding for yourself whether to use or not use!

-- Bill

View Randy T's profile

Randy T

21 posts in 123 days


#12 posted 06-03-2018 04:23 AM

LesB:
I finished my cutting boards with a mineral oil / wax mix. I was wondering about refinishing a bowl that I had made in high school with Danish oil. I want a finish that will completely dry so the bowl can be used to store fruit.
I think I like the idea of using a salad bowl finish.
Thanks folks for your suggestions.

-- Randy & Corinne, R&C Creations, British Columbia, https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/RccreationsCanada

View LesB's profile

LesB

1801 posts in 3560 days


#13 posted 06-06-2018 05:29 PM

Wildwood make a good point in checking the ingredients.

Behlen’s salad bowl finish is primarily Tung oil but does have solvents which evaporate in about 72 hours. The only other ingredient I found was Cobalt which is a metal necessary for good health and is found in dietary vitamin B12. It would take a lot of excess Cobalt for it to become toxic. In this instance is it used to help the Tung oil cure faster.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Randy T's profile

Randy T

21 posts in 123 days


#14 posted 06-06-2018 11:13 PM

Thanks Les

-- Randy & Corinne, R&C Creations, British Columbia, https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/RccreationsCanada

View Rich's profile

Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#15 posted 06-06-2018 11:50 PM

.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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