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A birthday gift from my brother-in-law

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Forum topic by David LaBolle posted 1137 days ago 1794 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David LaBolle

199 posts in 1267 days


1137 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question plane joining traditional rustic

I just got a set of three wooden planes as birthday gift from my brother-in-law who lives in Texas. They are un-like any wooden planes I’ve seen before. Each one has a rhino-horn-like handle at the front. One of them has Germany stamped on it. Can any one here tell me anything about this kind of plane?

Don’t you wish your brother-in-law was as cool as mine? ; )

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for


8 replies so far

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David LaBolle

199 posts in 1267 days


#1 posted 1137 days ago

Does anyone have any idea on how I can get a rough estimate of the age?

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

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Julio Alonso Diaz

173 posts in 1476 days


#2 posted 1137 days ago

I am not sure about these planes, do you know ECE planes ? have a look to this http://www.ecemmerich.com/hobel.html

Have fun David

-- El hombre que amo la madera. http://aulaflamingo.wordpress.com/

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David LaBolle

199 posts in 1267 days


#3 posted 1137 days ago

Thanks for the link. Those look like the modern descendants of the planes I was given. I guess they are German after all. I’ll have to start digging around the web.

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

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RGtools

3299 posts in 1250 days


#4 posted 1135 days ago

Very European design. Julio is right about ECE. So I will add what little I can.

The one with the wide mouth is a scrub plane and I would leave it close to as is. The smoothers, I would consider dovetailing in a piece of very hard wood to tighten the mouth You see this a lot on planes that saw heavy use.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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David LaBolle

199 posts in 1267 days


#5 posted 1135 days ago

Hmmm.

I will do a bit more research before I take that on. So far I have the two smoother planes sharpened well enough to shave with (my favorite method for testing my blades when I’m done). I, too, was thinking that the mouths are open much more than my other planes. I’m not sure if that is the old German design, or from heavy use. It looks too me they were designed that way. Now that I have them sharpened up, I’ll try them out and see how they perform as is. Since they are so old and a gift, I lean towards not wanting to modify them, other than basic maintenance, such as sharpening them or flattening the soles.

I’ve gotten fairly good at sharpening chisels and planes by hand, but am not sure how to sharpen the scrub plane with the rounded blade. How do you do that? Do you have to rock the rounded blade back and forth as you run it across the stone?

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

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helluvawreck

15382 posts in 1462 days


#6 posted 1135 days ago

The tree planes are beautiful and it was such a thoughtful gift.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9561 posts in 1214 days


#7 posted 1134 days ago

David;

Yes, very German and very nice! The heavily cambered blade one is indeed a scrub – the wide open mouth is also a dead giveaway. No need to close that up, it’s designed to hog out lots of material as you already know. Great thing about scrubs is, they don’t need to be extremely sharp to work well. If there’s a decent front hone to it, working the back only will usually get it up to snuff and ready for use. Kind of like shaper blades or cutters for a moulding / universal plane.

Hope this helps. Enjoy!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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RGtools

3299 posts in 1250 days


#8 posted 1134 days ago

Do you hollow grind? If so I think you will fin the process very easy. If not, then I recommend locking your elbows into your sides when you hone, and using your body to move the blade across the stone while keeping it in the correct orientation on the stone. I usually go from the left side of the blade and one the pull stroke move the blade across the stone slowly rotating as I go to finish on the right, then I start on the right and I go in reverse. Moderately sharp on a scrub is ok since it’s not a finish tool anyway so a bit of inconsistency does not hurt too much.

Deneb did a good video for Lie Nielsen that describes this better than I can, it’s on their you tube page.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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