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Walnut help - Something new for me

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Forum topic by TrBlu posted 06-11-2011 04:00 AM 1683 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TrBlu

379 posts in 2090 days


06-11-2011 04:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut

Mostly I make small items, like boxes and pens. Then I try to maximize and highlght the color variations in Walnut.

I recently started making a walnut coffee table. The color variations are nice, but the will likely highlight the joints in my table top.

I plan on using a tung oil and paste wax finish. How can I better camoflage my joints? I would like to reduce some of the color variation, but not loose it altogether.

Thank you for sharing your expertise.

Tim

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim


8 replies so far

View BobTheFish's profile

BobTheFish

361 posts in 2016 days


#1 posted 06-11-2011 04:56 AM

A light tonal stain is the way that comes to mind first and foremost.

View lew's profile

lew

11340 posts in 3220 days


#2 posted 06-11-2011 06:13 PM

There is a guy named Charles Neil. Check with LJ Jim for information. Charles is an expert on color matching.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View oblowme's profile

oblowme

91 posts in 2028 days


#3 posted 06-12-2011 03:25 PM

Walnut is normally steamed in the kiln to even the color, this you are working is not KD?

-- A TOOL JUNKIE- There, I just admited it to myself...

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TrBlu

379 posts in 2090 days


#4 posted 06-12-2011 08:42 PM

The walnut is kiln dried, quarter sawn. Some of the variation is sap wood.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4454 posts in 3425 days


#5 posted 06-12-2011 09:42 PM

Stain to even the variations if you like. I prefer the natural look.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2448 days


#6 posted 06-13-2011 04:16 AM

What you have is air dried walnut that looks something like this?

What I do is try to edge glue the cream colored sap wood together, or vicea versa so that the joints are in pretty much the same color. I learned this when working with eastern red cedar. If joining that way doesn’t look right to you then what I’ll do is cut the colors apart and glue up the sap wood to make a board for not so visible parts using the darker wood for the visible parts. Depending on how much lumber you have this can be a very interesting part of the project. That’s one of the reasons I enjoy working with the eastern red cedar.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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oblowme

91 posts in 2028 days


#7 posted 06-13-2011 02:03 PM

Quartered Walnut? Never seen it intentionly sawn that way, bet it’s pretty cool looking? I do as Gregn, highlight the difference, that is after all the way it comes from nature.

-- A TOOL JUNKIE- There, I just admited it to myself...

View Loren's profile

Loren

8306 posts in 3112 days


#8 posted 06-13-2011 05:59 PM

The danish furniture guys stain the sap wood to match.

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