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Sold my jointer

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Forum topic by Sparks500 posted 05-25-2018 12:15 PM 545 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sparks500

202 posts in 530 days


05-25-2018 12:15 PM

Been reworking my shop layout, don’t have a lot of room, and was considering going with a Cutech 8” portable, so, I sold my Jet 6”, actually got what I paid for it 10 years ago.
While I was helping the guy load it in his truck, I realized, this thing looks like the day I bought it! I almost never use it. Looked around the shop and saw the ancient Craftsman jointer plane my wife found at a garage sale many years ago, got it out and started playing around with it.
Going to restore that old plane and not look back. For as much as I need one, a jointer is simply not a necessity as there are workarounds that are just as effective. I’m not running any production, my shop is just therapy for old age and sometimes the workarounds are more fun….

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....


10 replies so far

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BlasterStumps

982 posts in 639 days


#1 posted 05-25-2018 12:53 PM

“Going to restore that old plane…”
Oh oh. The bug bites again. : )

Best of luck with it. Lots of info out there on fixing up hand planes. I’d be glad to help you if I can.
Show us a picture of it.
Mike

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Sparks500

202 posts in 530 days


#2 posted 05-25-2018 01:06 PM

I guess there‚Äôs something about feeling the wood, feeling the tool cut….

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

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JayT

5960 posts in 2411 days


#3 posted 05-25-2018 01:20 PM

Welcome to the slippery slope. Handplanes are awesome and addictive.

Jointers are the least needed piece of power equipment in the hobbyist shop, IMHO, yet one of the most recommended. It takes very little practice and time to be able to replace what they do with hand planes. A production shop is a different story—I can flatten out warp or twist faster by hand than with a powered jointer, I just don’t want to do it all day long. Glad you were able to look at how you work and find a positive change.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Sparks500

202 posts in 530 days


#4 posted 05-25-2018 01:51 PM

Some slippery slopes are helpful. Sometimes the answer has been in front of us the whole time….

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

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sras

4943 posts in 3329 days


#5 posted 05-25-2018 02:02 PM

Been woodworking for ~30 years. Never owned a jointer, never felt the need for one.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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bonesbr549

1576 posts in 3267 days


#6 posted 05-25-2018 02:11 PM

Any powered tool is a nicety. I had a 6” jointer that was a piece of crap and bought a LN A#7 and used it for a few years and worked great. However, if a lot of wood needs to be done, the power helps. I now have a 12” jointer that I love, and it’s a matter of speed. I start each project there (or at the chopsaw if breaking down large boards).

Still use a lot of hand tools, but some powered equipment sure do make life easier. However if space is an issue, there are workaround i.e planer sleds etc, to help too.

Cheers!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Sparks500

202 posts in 530 days


#7 posted 05-25-2018 02:18 PM

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

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Sparks500

202 posts in 530 days


#8 posted 05-25-2018 02:20 PM

She also found a pretty nice Bailey #5 and, has anyone ever heard of a Corsair?

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

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BlasterStumps

982 posts in 639 days


#9 posted 05-25-2018 05:42 PM

Corsair by Great Neck. I have some Great Neck tools that are not too bad for the home DIY’er.
That Craftsman jointer looks great. The secret to enjoying those hand planes is to learning how to sharpen the cutter.

I create a very slight camber on the cutting edge by lifting the blade on each side as I run it over the stone. I found that doing that it takes a very small amount off the outside ends of the cutter and it works well when set up properly with lateral adjustment.

TIP: You will want to make sure you hang onto your planes when handling and using them. One drop to the concrete can ruin a hand plane if it breaks the casting in the right place. It is easy to drop a plane, I know. : (

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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OSU55

1966 posts in 2189 days


#10 posted 05-25-2018 07:23 PM

Info to tune up your plane, and info on other plane choices just to help you get a good start into the hand plane vortex.

Once tuned there is a bit of skill in learning to use one, and many opinions on what is right vs wrong methods, bevel angles, blade cambers, cap iron settings, etc. It takes some experience and testing some things out, dont get discouraged if everything doesnt fall right into place immediately.

I agree a powered jointer comes in well behind a ts, planer, bs, and router on the hobbiest tool list. I will get one when I have room, but hand planes and a planer sled work pretty well.

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