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Forum topic by HawkDriver posted 06-09-2011 11:50 PM 1089 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


06-09-2011 11:50 PM

I have been asked to build a plaque for to celebrate a fallen brother. It will be used to designate a conference room in memoriam of the fallen soldier. The intent is to have his rank and name engraved into the wood across the top of the plaque with his picture underneath and a metal plaque attached below the photo giving the history of the soldier. My question lies with the picture. Im looking for suggestions on how to mount the picture to the plaque in the most elegant manner. Initially I was thinking a piece of plexi over top of it with some decorative nails securing the plexiglass and photo. I also was thinking of the possibility of some sort of epoxy finish completely covering the whole thing. Any suggestions are greatly sappreciated. Further info can be seen here

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.


12 replies so far

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#1 posted 06-10-2011 10:25 AM

Anyone?

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#2 posted 06-10-2011 05:38 PM

I’m suprised noone seems to want to give any input on this. This is for a fallen soldier. I edited the title to maybe generate some more interest.

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

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BilltheDiver

250 posts in 2345 days


#3 posted 06-10-2011 05:43 PM

How about using a router inlay kit to mortise the area for the picture so that both the photo and the glass (or plexi if you prefer) sit flush with the surface? Depending on what you want you could either use a rectangular picture and glass, or cut it into an oval.

Another approach would be to rout it from the back, leaving a rabbit in front to hold the glass and photo, with a backer behind it.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#4 posted 06-10-2011 06:10 PM

Bill,
Those are some great ideas. I hadn’t thought about inlay. If I did the inlay, is there a way to ensure the glass won’t fall out yet still maintain the flush surface?

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#5 posted 06-10-2011 06:14 PM

I’m not ignoring you; it’s a combination of thinking unproductively and partly not understanding the project. I want to help, I promise!!!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#6 posted 06-10-2011 06:15 PM

Thanks Al, I’ll take a pic of my sketch

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 06-10-2011 06:17 PM

I think you have a few choices, if I understand the project.
1) you can place the image behind glass or plexi in a square dish rebate of sorts (don’t know how to describe it)
2) you could have the image embedded in plastic. There are online providers of this
3) you could embed the plaque in plastic (with photo) yourself, like bar surface epoxy, etc.
4) You could get someone with a CNC to etch it, burn it, etc, directly into the wood
I’m thinking outloud.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#8 posted 06-10-2011 07:05 PM

Please try not to be blown away by my superb artwork but this is a rough design for the plaque. It will be made with the wood salvaged from the hangers

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

250 posts in 2345 days


#9 posted 06-10-2011 07:08 PM

If you decided to inlay the picture and the glass into a mortise, you could simply epoxy the glass in place or use a thin bead of clear silicone adhesive. I just completed a project where I inlaid a purpleheart oval into a maple box lid using a router inlay kit, and I can tell you that the fit you would get from an oval piece of glass should be exact. You wouldn’t need much adhesive.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#10 posted 06-10-2011 07:09 PM

LOL, it looks just like him! I think we’re all talking about the same thing. If you precisely cut a shallow “plate” or “dish” to the depth of the glass+photo thickness, I think it would look sharp. You could even add a contrasting inlay around the periphery of the photo. This is going to be a nice project. I hope the ideas start rolling in. Another quick thought: you could get the whole thing “permaplaqued” like a diploma.

http://www.permaplaque.com/

They’re a tad expensive but after spending $400,000 on graduate school, I sprung for one ;) It’s very well done, perfectly flat, and durable (I haven’t exactly treated mine gently during multiple moves). Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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HawkDriver

447 posts in 2093 days


#11 posted 06-10-2011 07:17 PM

Al, I love your light hearted approach to things. Im a bit confused about the permaplaque. There isn’t really a whole lot of info on their website. Is it just a lamination process for paper documents? It seemed they had frames as well which I wouldn’t need. My take is that I would send them my picture and they would send it back with a rugged transparent coating on it? If thats the case I could bypass the glass over the picture then?
Thanks for helping me guys.

Bill,
Could you reccomend an inlay system? I have seen Rocklers but it has mixed reviews. Thanks!

Pat

-- Patrick, Helicopters don't fly. They beat the air into submission.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#12 posted 06-10-2011 07:21 PM

Thanks Hawk;) The permaplaque guys typically take your document, mount it somehow on a board, then just encase the whole thing in plastic. My thought was that they would probably accept your pre-mounted work or better yet, you could just plasticize the whole thing yourself.

Like a bartop epoxy maybe?

http://www.epoxyproducts.com/bartop.html

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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