LumberJocks

Fractal burning solution?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by becikeja posted 05-25-2018 11:51 AM 702 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View becikeja's profile

becikeja

909 posts in 2898 days


05-25-2018 11:51 AM

A couple of weekends ago I came across an old neon sign for $25 (the tubes were broken) so I bought it for the transformer. This weekend I plan to transform it into a fractal wood burning machine and give a try.
It seems that most use a baking soda mixture of one cup of water and a tablespoon of baking soda. Just wondering what other solutions have been tried, results, etc…....
Any opinions / suggestions?

-- Don't outsmart your common sense


13 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

214 posts in 1558 days


#1 posted 05-25-2018 01:14 PM

I’ve used salt in water, with about the same results as baking soda. I found that, on some woods, baking soda really darkens the colour.

Be very, very careful out there. As I’m sure you already know, this practice can kill you.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

92 posts in 310 days


#2 posted 05-25-2018 02:46 PM



I ve used salt in water, with about the same results as baking soda. I found that, on some woods, baking soda really darkens the colour.

Be very, very careful out there. As I m sure you already know, this practice can kill you.

- gwilki

Yea, I remember a video where they guy was like 110v it’ll give you a chance, bite, oh that hurts…this, if you mess up there is no second chance, and as a noodler once said “you’ll be having supper with jesus tonight”.

If I ever made one, I’d make some kind of dead man switch, double redundant etc….

-- Justin

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2206 posts in 1307 days


#3 posted 05-25-2018 06:52 PM

I use a soda solution and a small spray bottle (lens cleaner bottle) to mist the wood surface. Most any other ionizer such as salt will also work.

Wood selection is important as the solution tends to absorb more in the grain rings, causing the burning to follow. Non-grainy woods such as maple and birch ply give better “lightning” patterns as the burning follows a more random pattern.

Typically I’ll attach the electrodes to the ends of the board, then spritz the surface with the solution. I then energize the setup and use further spritzes to control the patterns as they develop.

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10142 posts in 3117 days


#4 posted 05-25-2018 08:25 PM



I ve used salt in water, with about the same results as baking soda. I found that, on some woods, baking soda really darkens the colour.

Be very, very careful out there. As I m sure you already know, this practice can kill you.

- gwilki

Very, Very Careful! Yes. It can KILL You!

-- If it wasn't for Electricity, We'd all be Watching Television by Candlelight!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2050 posts in 3029 days


#5 posted 05-25-2018 09:03 PM

I like the idea of a solid fiberglass painter pole, and a 1” rubber mat (I use horse mats for the floor of my shop) under me, if I were doing this, and I made my living around electrons and the occasional high voltage device (e.g., RF transmitters).

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

387 posts in 3167 days


#6 posted 05-25-2018 09:05 PM

Do a lot of research on safety before starting. Also search for Lichtenberg wood burning. Some of the designs are really beautiful.

Please post some pictures if you survive the weekend. :)

-- Steve

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

909 posts in 2898 days


#7 posted 05-26-2018 03:08 AM

No worries, and I really do appreciate the concern. I’m 30 years in the electrical distribution industry, well aware of the risks and safety precautions to take. I plan to use a double palm switch requiring both hands to hold the circuit closed. If either hand breaks connection the circuit will open.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5488 posts in 2493 days


#8 posted 05-26-2018 04:23 AM



No worries, and I really do appreciate the concern. I’m 30 years in the electrical distribution industry, well aware of the risks and safety precautions to take. I plan to use a double palm switch requiring both hands to hold the circuit closed. If either hand breaks connection the circuit will open.

- becikeja

In adding to your safety protocols have someone with you. Explain what is going on, and what can go wrong, and what to do if it goes wrong. In Iraq we called this a TSTI (total safety task initiative) While a pain to take time to do it did prevent accidents when used, and if an accident occurred everyone involved knew what to do.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

909 posts in 2898 days


#9 posted 06-04-2018 01:02 AM

Burned a lot slower than I had anticipated, but worked well.
I ran a test on Pine, Oak Plywood, and Mahogany. The Pine created a nice burn but the wood turned green from the baking soda solution, same effect on the oak. Was not expecting the green tint. The Oak Plywood was disappointing. The Mahogany darkened front the solution, and gave a really nice result. The Mahogany was definitely the best result.

Any idea why the Pine and Oak turned green?

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2050 posts in 3029 days


#10 posted 06-04-2018 01:48 AM

Tannic acid fighting with baking soda?

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

937 posts in 1526 days


#11 posted 06-04-2018 02:20 AM

Pics?? (No pics= didn’t happen :-) )

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

909 posts in 2898 days


#12 posted 06-04-2018 06:26 PM

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2206 posts in 1307 days


#13 posted 06-04-2018 06:34 PM

See if the “green” sands away. I thing the figures always look better after a sanding with a R.O. and 220 paper. The fine details really come out.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com