LumberJocks

Attaching a mitered edge to a flat base

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 05-24-2018 05:36 AM 548 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1491 days


05-24-2018 05:36 AM

He everyone,

So I am designing my latest project on Sketchup and I have hit a snag. I think to best describe the problem I need to show you.

I need to figure out a way to attach Part A TO B. I thought about using a biscuit joint but not sure I can geta biscuit slot positioned correctly in the Base to Attach Part A.

If anyone has a solution please share.

Thanks
Ed

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”


20 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2528 days


#1 posted 05-24-2018 05:47 AM

I don’t think a biscuit would be that hard but you could glue it then come back and add dowels. You could also do a spline.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View go4tech's profile

go4tech

14 posts in 1174 days


#2 posted 05-24-2018 06:07 AM

Two Quick Thoughts.

A) It appears that the upper piece connected to “Part A” is done so with a dado and some form of screws/pinning.

It might be possible to use a similar approach with the base. Match drill through “Part B” into “Part A” Insert dowels.

Depending on the weight to be held and the thickness of “Part A” this might work.

B) Make “Part B” as three parts. A full bottom piece and a two part upper piece. The upper piece can be cut into two pieces on a 45 degree angle. The three pieces of Part B can be easily assembled to leave a flat bottom “dado” the width of “Part A”.

If the resulting horizontal seem is not so good, it can be covered with some trimming. Worse case one would have to match cut the trim pieces to fit “Part A”. Something that can be accomplished with not so much effort with sharp chisels and a razor knife.

Just remember, where there is a will, there is a way! That is until the will gets in the way.

Best regards,
JK

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

681 posts in 2295 days


#3 posted 05-24-2018 01:32 PM

What does the other end of “Part A” connect to? To me that makes a big difference in how much strength is needed from the A:B connection. But I do agree with the others; glue it and let it dry then use dowels from underneath of part B.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2681 posts in 1048 days


#4 posted 05-24-2018 02:13 PM

Leave the end of part A square, and do an angled dado in part B.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2528 posts in 1536 days


#5 posted 05-24-2018 02:31 PM

If A & B are the same thickness, it would seem that in order to get both edges of A completely inside the angled dado, you would have to cut all the way through? If nothing else, B would be severely weakened by such a deep dado. A better approach might be to make a flat bottomed dado with 45 degree shoulders (with the end of the board cut at 45 as in the original drawing). You could cut that with a multiple cross cuts using regular saw blade with a single depth setting and smooth out with a chisel.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3668 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 05-24-2018 02:37 PM


If A & B are the same thickness, it would seem that in order to get both edges of A completely inside the angled dado, you would have to cut all the way through?

- Lazyman

No, at 45º the depth of cut would be √2/2 or approximately 0.707 of the thickness. That would only be a problem if the board carried a load unsupported on one end, or in the middle. If it sits flat on a surface, it won’t hurt a thing.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2528 posts in 1536 days


#7 posted 05-24-2018 03:34 PM

Yeah, I did the math and came to the same conclusion but this looks like either a bookshelf or wine rack for example so it could have a significant weight on it. You’ll want the right edge at least 1/16th” but probably more like 1/8th” deep to trap it there and have at least a little glue surface. At 1/8th” deep on a 3/4” board, you’ll only have about 3/32” on the bottom.

Personally, I think that the dado on the right is easier to cut and stronger as well, even if you have a saw and dado stack capable of cutting a nearly 3/4” dado. I think it looks better too, assuming it will be exposed.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2681 posts in 1048 days


#8 posted 05-24-2018 03:58 PM

double post

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2681 posts in 1048 days


#9 posted 05-24-2018 04:00 PM

Yeah, I did the math and came to the same conclusion but this looks like either a bookshelf or wine rack for example so it could have a significant weight on it. You ll want the right edge at least 1/16th” but probably more like 1/8th” deep to trap it there and have at least a little glue surface. At 1/8th” deep on a 3/4” board, you ll only have about 3/32” on the bottom.

Personally, I think that the dado on the right is easier to cut and stronger as well, even if you have a saw and dado stack capable of cutting a nearly 3/4” dado. I think it looks better too, assuming it will be exposed.

- Lazyman

How do you cut that dado and leave an angled bottom?
The way I showed you could easily leave 1/4” at the bottom. No need to go an 1/8” deep.

Also, you shouldn’t knock a method when there aren’t all the facts.
Obviously it depends on what he is making…

I always figured ideas shown to be food for thought, Poster can always revise idea.

Many ways to skin a cat.

- jbay

View Rich's profile

Rich

3668 posts in 738 days


#10 posted 05-24-2018 04:11 PM

Personally, I think that the dado on the right is easier to cut and stronger as well, even if you have a saw and dado stack capable of cutting a nearly 3/4” dado. I think it looks better too, assuming it will be exposed.

- Lazyman

How do you cut that dado and leave an angled bottom?

- jbay

I was wondering the same thing. Wouldn’t you need a dado stack with a 45º angle in order to get the flat bottom? Even making it with multiple cuts using a regular saw blade would leave a zigzag surface.

If I had done it, I’d have wound up using biscuits. The PC557 allows the fence to be swung around to 135º to positively cut the slots in the mitered piece. The DeWalt has a feature that allows it too.

That’s just me though, based on what would have seemed obvious to me at the time. I’d never have thought of doing it jbay’s way, which is far superior. Like jbay says though, there are other factors we don’t know regarding how it will be used, what the loads are, etc.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2528 days


#11 posted 05-24-2018 04:47 PM

Adding dowels through the bottom after the fact is easiest and probably strongest but biscuits are not too difficult either. They can be straight up and down and use the 45d fence on the miter.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1491 days


#12 posted 05-24-2018 05:13 PM

Thanks everyone that replied .. some very good ideas I think I’m going to do biscuits into the 45° angle and figure a way to transfer that angle into the baseboard (B) and after that I might try adding some 3/8” dowels from under neat .. it’s a tall book stand I am making with all the shelves at 45° angles with lips that are 5” wide.. I really need to stabilize the unit because right now it’s wobbly . To be on the safe side too I’m going to attach it to the wall either into studs or put drywall anchors through the legs

Thanks again

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

View Rich's profile

Rich

3668 posts in 738 days


#13 posted 05-24-2018 05:19 PM


Thanks everyone that replied .. some very good ideas I think I’m going to do biscuits into the 45° angle and figure a way to transfer that angle into the baseboard

Thanks again

- EdsCustomWoodCrafts

If you cut the biscuit slot straight into the face of the miter, then the slot in the baseboard will be vertical. Both are very easy cuts to make. Like I said, most biscuit joiners have some facility to make that cut into the face of the miter. You need a way to ensure the slots all line up along it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2681 posts in 1048 days


#14 posted 05-24-2018 05:24 PM

Just glue it and put in a couple of 23 gauge pins, then add screws from the bottom. (pre-drill and countersink)
Why biscuits or dowels?
Screws will be easier and do the same thing.

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1491 days


#15 posted 05-24-2018 06:32 PM

Actually after thinking about it some more I am going to try the 45 degree angled dado cut, then add glue and run 1” long dowels from the under side of the base into the A piece..

Like below

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com