LumberJocks

Can anyone help me determine the type of this Stanley transitional plane?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by NovacWoodworks posted 05-24-2018 01:26 AM 3189 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View NovacWoodworks's profile

NovacWoodworks

6 posts in 155 days


05-24-2018 01:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane type plane typing transitional plane stanley plane type stanley plane plane dating

Any Stanley Type experts out there?

I picked up an early Stanley transitional plane at a garage sale last weekend but I’m having difficulties determining the type as I can only find type studies for metal body planes and Liberty Bell planes. If anyone has extensive knowledge of Stanley types and/or transitional planes your insight would be greatly appreciated!

Based on the patents and features listed below it lines up pretty well with Stanley type 2 or 3 metal body bench planes, but I’m hoping that someone with more transitional plane knowledge will be able to confirm or deny if that applies to these planes as well.

It has the eagle trademark (with the number below) stamped into the toe, the Bailey’s Patent Aug. 31, 1856, Aug. 6, 1867 stamped on the inside of the recessed adjustment knob, and Bailey’s Patent Dec. 24, 1867 stamped on the cap iron. I can’t see any part of the stamp on the iron and I don’t want to start cleaning more than brushing the dirt and dust off until I’ve dated the plane.


Trademark Stamp


Adjustment Knob


Cap Iron


10 replies so far

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1286 posts in 3038 days


#1 posted 05-24-2018 01:46 AM

Is it 20 inches long?
2 3/8 wide blade?
if so, it is a model 29.
I can’t make out the marks on the blade.

Murphy’s oils soap would make the body cleaner and marks more legable.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View NovacWoodworks's profile

NovacWoodworks

6 posts in 155 days


#2 posted 05-24-2018 03:40 AM


Is it 20 inches long?
2 3/8 wide blade?
if so, it is a model 29.
I can t make out the marks on the blade.

Murphy s oils soap would make the body cleaner and marks more legable.

- ksSlim

It is a model 29. I’m just trying to figure out when it was made before I start restoring it. If it’s as early a piece as I think it is I don’t want to over do the restoration.

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

168 posts in 632 days


#3 posted 05-24-2018 03:53 AM

Says 1850 on the adjuster dial

-- Matthew 13:53-58

View NovacWoodworks's profile

NovacWoodworks

6 posts in 155 days


#4 posted 05-24-2018 04:09 AM



Says 1850 on the adjuster dial

- r33tc0w

The 1856 and 1867 patent dates are present on the adjustment knob from 1869-1899 (in the case of metal body planes at least) I’m looking to get help narrowing down the specific Type of this plane through the combination of the features/patents on the various parts.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

21304 posts in 2831 days


#5 posted 05-24-2018 01:50 PM

Go to Timetestedtools….and look up the info on the Transitional Planes….

I have the later ones without the eagle..

No. 28 and No. 29….someone had trimmed the 29 down a bit on the ends…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View NovacWoodworks's profile

NovacWoodworks

6 posts in 155 days


#6 posted 05-24-2018 02:15 PM



Go to Timetestedtools….and look up the info on the Transitional Planes….

I have the later ones without the eagle..

No. 28 and No. 29….someone had trimmed the 29 down a bit on the ends…

- bandit571

Those are some nice looking planes!
I just came across the Timetestedtools article last night, it’s the best resource I’ve seen so far, but I still can’t quite narrow it down as much as I’d like to.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5884 posts in 2359 days


#7 posted 05-24-2018 04:27 PM

Does it have a lateral adjustment lever?

1886 is when laterals were added to transitionals.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Don W's profile

Don W

18966 posts in 2715 days


#8 posted 05-24-2018 08:30 PM

The Eagle logo was early. We’d need to see more to really determine the exact type.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View NovacWoodworks's profile

NovacWoodworks

6 posts in 155 days


#9 posted 05-24-2018 11:00 PM



The Eagle logo was early. We d need to see more to really determine the exact type.

- Don W

What details would you need to see?

View Don W's profile

Don W

18966 posts in 2715 days


#10 posted 05-25-2018 09:27 AM


The Eagle logo was early. We d need to see more to really determine the exact type.

- Don W

What details would you need to see?

- NovacWoodworks

http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/03/04/my-transitional-planes/

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com